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Gaming

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • What have you been playing recently and what do you think about it?

    Having seen a number of great Linux releases lately, it's getting tough opening Steam and actually picking something to play. The very new release of Pine has certainly sucked away a lot of my time, something about the world Twirlbound created has seriously pulled me in. It's not without issues though. While forcing my CPU to stay in Performance mode has made it smoother, it definitely needs improving.

  • Dota 2 matchmaking may be less terrible now for solo players and more difficult for toxic people

    Valve continue to do some pretty big tweaks to the matchmaking system in Dota 2, with another blog post and update talking about all the improvements they're implementing.

    This is following on from all the other changes recently like the ban waves and sounds like they're really pushing to make the Dota 2 community and gameplay better for everyone.

    Ever played a game of Dota 2 by yourself and get matched against an entire team of people? I have, it sucks. They're all forming a strategy, while half of your team are telling each other they're going to report them. It happened for a lot of others too and Valve have finally put a stop to it. In the latest blog post, Valve said that now a five-player team will only be matched up against other five-player teams. For Solo players, they will now only be matched up with a party maximum of two, so Solo players will either now be against an entire team of other Solo players or possibly three solo players and one party of two.

  • Arizona Sunshine | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 19.04 | Steam Play

    Arizona Sunshine VR running through Steam play.

Games: SanAndreasUnity, Legend of Keepers, X-Plane

Filed under
Gaming
  • The GTA: San Andreas remake in Unity has a new release out

    SanAndreasUnity, an open source remake of the game engine for GTA: San Andreas that aims to be cross-platform has a new release out, with better Linux support included.

  • Tactical dungeon management game Legend of Keepers has a free prologue out

    Goblinz Studio are currently development Legend of Keepers, a tactical dungeon management game where you're the bad guys. It now has a free prologue available to test on Linux.

    From what they said, it's a mix between a "Roguelite and a Dungeon Management" game. Blending two different game phases together, where you first setup a defensive force for your dungeon and then wait for the heroes to come along and see if you manage to mount a successful barrier. A bit like "a reversed dungeon crawler", as they say anyway.

  • X-Plane 11.50 Flight Simulator Bringing Vulkan Support

    For years we have been looking forward to the realistic X-Plane flight simulator rendered by Vulkan as an alternative to their long-standing OpenGL render and with X-Plane 11.50 that is finally being made a reality.

    X-Plane has long offered great support for Linux on-par with their Windows and macOS support. X-Plane's OpenGL renderer has been showing its age for a while and now the developers at Laminar Research have confirmed their Vulkan (and Apple Metal) renderer support is coming with X-Plane 11.50.

Upcoming change will make Linux gaming a reality on Chromebooks

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Linux on Chrome OS, a.ka. Crostini has primarily focused on creating a viable path for developers to adopt Chromebooks as a primary device. The addition of GPU support did a lot to advance that goal but there’s still a large group of Linux users that could benefit from Crostini if this latest update has anything to do about it. That group is gamers.

Now, I know that we’re all excited about Stadia launching next month. If rumors are correct, it could change the face of gaming as we know it. Still, there are a lot of games out there that live in the PC environment that will never see the grand stage that is Stadia. Personally, I am a huge fan of Source games that run on the Steam network and since I don’t own a PC anymore, my only option to jump into a Day of Defeat GunGame match has been to use the old school Crouton method on a Chromebook. All-in-all, most of my Steam games run quite well using the “hacky” Linux method but I would love to be able to install Steam via Crostini and play my games natively.

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Games: Descenders, BOC, Pegasus Frontend, Runefall 2 and Dota 2

Filed under
Gaming
  • Extreme biking game 'Descenders' adds mod.io integration and a funny Wipeout inspired map

    Get ready for a few more cuts and bruises as RageSquid and No More Robots just gave Descenders the biggest update yet. Modding support is now in using mod.io along with a massive new map.

    Thanks to the mod.io integration, you can subscribe to and download mods directly in the game and it works perfectly. They said they went with mod.io instead of the Steam Workshop to ensure that everyone could play together easily, which is part of the point of mod.io to make mods cross-platform with open APIs.

  • 4x strategy game 'BOC: The Birth Of Civilizations' is now on Kickstarter

    BOC is a game we highlighted last month as it certainly seems like an incredibly interesting 4x strategy game that will be supporting Linux. It's now on Kickstarter to take it through to release.

    Impressively, they built their own custom cross-platform game engine for BOC. Allowing them to create a huge world for you to spread your civilization across. The developer, Code::Arts, has some rather grand sounding plans for it too. Check out the new trailer for it below:

  • Pegasus Frontend, the customizable open source graphical game launcher has a new release up

    Pegasus Frontend is certainly promising, an open source graphical game launcher you can use across Linux, MacOS, Windows, Raspberry Pi, Android and more.

    With a focus on customization with full control over the UI, support for EmulationStation's gamelist files and more it certainly sounds like a useful application to manage your game library especially for big-screen usage.

  • After a casual game for the weekend? Runefall 2 brings some more match-3 to Linux

    Just released this week is Runefall 2 from Playcademy and GC Games, a pretty great looking casual match-3 game.

    Match 3 games are still underserved on Linux, with very few high quality titles of the genre so it really is great to see more. People often underestimate how big the casual market is. As for Runefall 2, this is the first Linux release from Playcademy!

  • Dota 2 matchmaking may be a less terrible now for solo players and more adjustments for toxic people

    Valve continue to do some pretty big tweaks to the matchmaking system in Dota 2, with another blog post and update talking about all the improvements they're implementing.

    This is following on from all the other changes recently like the ban waves and sounds like they're really pushing to make the Dota 2 community and gameplay better for everyone.

    Ever played a game of Dota 2 by yourself and get matched against an entire team of people? I have, it sucks. They're all forming a strategy, while half of your team are telling each other they're going to report them. It happened for a lot of others too and Valve have finally put a stop to it. In the latest blog post, Valve said that now a five-player team will only be matched up against other five-player teams. For Solo players, they will now only be matched up with a party maximum of two, so Solo players will either now be against an entire team of other Solo players or possibly three solo players and one party of two.

Games: Pine, Playing with Godot and Valve's ACO Work

Filed under
Gaming
  • Open-world action adventure 'Pine' where humans are not top of the food chain is now available

    Pine certainly looks good, a proper open-world action adventure with a story depicting humans who never reached the top of the food chain. It just release with Linux support today.

    Note: Both the publisher and GOG sent a copy for us.

  • Playing with Godot

    I guess it is quite common to start the path towards programming by making games. I started with a simple guess the number on my dad?s zx81 back in the day. He must have written most of it, but I felt proud of the result, so I will claim that it was mine.

    I?ve experimented with various ways to get my kids into programming. Everything from board games, online resources, scratch, building shitty robots, and so on. They get it, but it is hard to move on from the basics to being able to start from a clean sheet of paper and create something.

    During the summer, I decided to look into the various options and tried using Unity and Godot. After a couple of experiments, I settled on using Godot. Partly because of its open nature, but also because as a tool, it does the job I need it to do just as well as Unity.

  • Valve's Radeon "ACO" Vulkan Compiler Back-End Now Supports Navi

    The promising ACO compiler back-end for the Radeon "RADV" Vulkan driver now has support for GFX10/Navi graphics!

    ACO was recently merged into Mesa 19.3 for this Valve-funded, gaming-focused Vulkan shader compiler back-end for RADV. But up until now it has only supported GFX8 and GFX9 hardware while now initial Navi/GFX10 support has been merged. ACO ultimately aims to deliver better performance over the existing back-end while also more quickly compiling shaders to help with game load times.

Games: Remote Play Together, Pathway, Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac, Insignificant, Stellaris

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve will bring out 'Remote Play Together' to give online support to local multiplayer games

    The Steam pipes are leaking over at Valve again, as an upcoming feature called Remote Play Together is coming during the week of October 21.

    Valve sent word just to game developers, which they never keep quiet on for very long. Multiple game developers (#1, #2 and so on) ended up putting out posts on Twitter to let everyone know about it a bit earlier than Valve seems to have intended.

  • Strategy adventure game 'Pathway' has a huge Adventurers Wanted update, plus a note about Linux

    Get ready for another adventure as Pathway just got bigger and better with a huge free update now available.

    Mixing together node-based travel (think like FTL and Slay the Spire) with random events and turn-based tactical combat, Pathway is a fun game. However, when you've played a lot of hours it can end up perhaps a bit too repetitive. You realise later on the limitations of the game that aren't quite apparent until you really push through it. Now though? Sounds like it's a massive improvement to all areas of the game!

    The Adventurers Wanted update adds in…deep breath, are you ready? 18 new combat abilities with new ways to interact with both enemies and allies, reworked skill trees, a "sizeable" amount of new events have been added including many new combat arenas to give it more variety, you no longer stock up on consumables like medkits and instead have a new resource called Supplies which is used across multiple items, new combat modes to adjust how combat begins for more variation, an improved armour system that makes armour give direct damage reduction and the list goes on.

  • The new trailer for Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac has me wanting more especially after the great demo

    Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac from the French team at La Poule Noir is an upcoming comedy point and click adventure coming to Linux, the new trailer is up and continues my excitement for this one.

    It's a story rich whimsical adventure, with a protagonist who is a bit…eccentric. The kind where you can see a bit of yourself in them and you can't help but love their weirdness. He loves his chicken, which is amusingly sweet when he calls it "Precious" during dialogue. A dark comic adventure about saving your beloved squash and you stumble upon a "most terrifying secret" during your journey.

  • Bizarre action-RPG 'Insignificant' where you're three inches tall is out now with Linux support

    Insignificant is an action-RPG that tells the story of the little people and when I say that I really do mean tiny little people, you're only about three inches tall.

  • Stellaris 2.4 is out with the new Paradox Launcher included

    Paradox Interactive and Paradox Development Studio have released the latest update to Stellaris, which includes the new Paradox Launcher to unify the experience.

    The launcher isn't all that's new though. If you're running Stellaris from their own store or GOG they have added in cloud saving to both. Paradox also updated all factions titans "with panning light meshes", updates to the visual effects for "ther drake’s wing attack (muzzle, projectile, hit effect)" and new "/mute " and "/unmute " chat commands were added. Defence Platforms also got a boost for Outposts, providing 2 points of Piracy Suppression for their system.

    A bunch of UI updates also made it in like the ability to Shift+Click on the ship count in the Fleet Manager, adding ships up to the nearest 10. There's more tooltips on the Planet Screen, a new notification when one empire guarantees the in

Games: Nobodies and Steam Play Proton 4.11-7

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Gaming

Games: Indivisible, Top 7 Best PSP Emulators for Android, Cecconoid, Orx, Hexa Trains and GGPO

Filed under
Gaming
  • Indivisible, the action RPG platformer from the creator of Skullgirls is out now

    It's been a long road, after being announced back in 2015 with a successful crowdfunding campaign on IndieGoGo it very much delivers. Honestly, I don't know where to really start with Indivisible. It's blown me away. This might be one of the most colourful and gorgeously designed games I've played in a very long time. It reminds me of the first time I played Bastion, it looks incredible.

  • Top 7 Best PSP Emulators for Android Device in 2019

    Gaming companies have produced special games for Playstation which are not often available for Android. So, it has become a great problem for them who love to play new and updated games but cannot afford a PlayStation. But technology doesn’t stay silent and has introduced us to new technology. It is the PSP emulator. You can easily run your favorite PSP games on your Android device using this PSP Emulators.

    [...]

    Here, you will find 7 innovative PSP emulators for Android. So, whatever devices you are using, you can use it if it is compatible with the PSP game you are going to run. So, just read out the important features to understand the specifications and choose the best PSP emulator for your device.

  • 8-bit inspired, flip-screen, twin-stick-shooter 'Cecconoid' is out with Linux support

    Triple Eh? Ltd yesterday released Cecconoid, an 8-bit inspired twin-stick shooter with a flip-screen mechanic where you go through a series of rooms and blow everything up.

  • Looking to make 2D games? Perhaps the Orx game engine might be suitable for you

    One we've never covered before at all is the free and open source Orx. A lightweight, plugin-based, data-driven and extremely easy to use 2D-oriented game engine.

    There's tons of game engines out there, quite a lot of them open source too. Recently we covered GDevelop, Godot Engine and ct.js so here's another one that might take your interest. Designed to be fully cross-platform across Linux, MacOS, Windows and mobile devices the feature list it offers is rather impressive.

  • Developed on Linux, the train transportation sim 'Hexa Trains' is out now

    After an unsuccessful Kickstarter campaign, solo developer Bram Stolk has released Hexa Trains on Steam. Developed on Linux, this unusually styled transportation sim certainly looks interesting. Note: Key provided to our Steam Curator.

    Stolk is the same developer who previously made The Little Crane That Could, which released back in 2015 on Steam and it ended up rather popular on mobile. Nice to see a familiar name return with something completely different. Hexa Trains is all about railroads, building up a successful and smooth transport service across a planet as you link stations across it to various resource buildings.

  • GGPO, a rollback networking SDK for peer-to-peer games has gone open source

    Oh how I do love to see more projects go open source! GGPO, a rollback networking SDK for peer-to-peer games that's designed to help hide network latency in fast-paced games that requires precise inputs is now on GitHub.

    Created originally by Tony Cannon, one of the founders of the Evolution Championship Series (EVO), GPPO is a well-known middleware in the fighting game scene. It's used in a number of games including Skullgirls, Brawlhalla, Fantasy Strike, Dragon Ball: Zenkai Battle, Killer Instinct and the list goes on. Cannon announced the change in licensing on Twitter earlier today.

Trouble in Atari VCS Land

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Gaming
  • Game over: Atari VCS architect quits project, claims he hasn’t been paid for six months

    The architect of Atari’s much-delayed retro console, the Atari VCS, has quit the project, claiming he hasn't been paid in six months. The departure could put the entire affair in doubt.

    Games industry veteran, one of the founding team members behind the Xbox, and Atari system architect, Rob Wyatt told The Register: “As of Friday, October 4th, I have officially resigned as the architect of the Atari VCS."

    The techie claimed "Atari haven't paid invoices going back over six months" to his design consultancy, Tin Giant, which was working on the VCS, adding: "As a small company, we have been lucky to survive this long.”

  • Things are going downhill for the Atari VCS as Rob Wyatt quits

    It's now confirmed that Rob Wyatt, someone who Atari made a big thing over joining them has quit citing non payment of invoices for at least six months.

    As confirmed by The Register who spoke to Wyatt, things have not been going well. Not only has Wyatt completely left the project, it sounds like Atari don't exactly know what they're doing. Originally, Atari said it would have their own Linux-based OS with an easy to use UI and their own store. According to sources The Register spoke to who've had direct contact with the VCS project, that might no longer happen. Sounds like it's turning into a regular Linux box now.

    No game developers have signed up to make original games, which is something I expected after their first announcement about actual games years after the IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign was a retro streaming service. On top of that, they've not been able to pull in the big game engines like Unreal or Unity too.

Games: OpenTESArena, Neo Cab, Don't Starve Together and Voxel Turf

Filed under
Gaming
  • OpenTESArena, an open source re-implementation of The Elder Scrolls: Arena

    A fun open source game engine project we've not covered here before is OpenTESArena, an open source re-implementation of The Elder Scrolls: Arena and it just had a new release.

    Inspired by other similar projects like OpenXcom and OpenMW, their aim is to have a clean and cross-platform version using the original assets which you can get free from Bethesda. A few days ago a new release was put out to include Wilderness generation, Wilderness automap, City <-> wilderness transitions via city gate, City placeholder in wilderness, Player position in wilderness displayed with F2, CD version support and initial work on inventory slots.

  • Hold onto your humanity as the incredibly stylish Neo Cab is coming to Linux

    After some confusion, it turns out Neo Cab from developer Chance Agency and publisher Fellow Traveller will be coming to Linux.

    What is it? In Neo Cab, you play as Lina, someone making a last stand as a human driver-for-hire in a world increasingly overcome by automation. It's seriously stylish and has a story that will make you think about the way the world is going.

  • Don't Starve Together launches another big free update with 'Return of them - Salty Dog'

    Easily one of the best and most stylish multiplayer survival games available on Linux, Don't Starve Together has another big free update out with Return of them - Salty Dog.

    Don't Starve Together is becoming a rather large game now, there's so much to explore it's easy to get lost in the world. This is the full release of a recent Beta they did last month.

  • First-person block-based urban sandbox city-builder 'Voxel Turf' adds new biomes

    Voxel Turf is such a unique gem that blends multiple types of games together. It allows you to run around in first-person, build a city and fight off gangs. A big surprise update just dropped too.

    More work on performance went into this update, with the developer adding in "more intelligent entity culling". They say on average you should see an increase of 10% FPS in built-up busy areas which sounds good. They also did some map adjustments for bandits and dungeons not drawing unless you're in one and sun/moonlight shadows are not drawn while you are underground resulting in a big speedup in certain areas too.

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Android Leftovers

Python Programming Leftovers

  • How to Read SAS Files in Python with Pandas

    In this post, we are going to learn how to read SAS (.sas7dbat) files in Python. As previously described (in the read .sav files in Python post) Python is a general-purpose language that also can be used for doing data analysis and data visualization.

  • Daudin – a Python shell

    A few nights ago I wrote daudin, a command-line shell based on Python. It allows you to easily mix UNIX and Python on the command line.

  • How to Convert Python String to Int and Back to String

    This tutorial describes various ways to convert Python string to int and from an integer to string. You may often need to perform such operations in day to day programming. Hence, you should know them to write better programs. Also, an integer can be represented in different bases, so we’ll explain that too in this post. And there happen to be scenarios where conversion fails. Hence, you should consider such cases as well and can find a full reference given here with examples.

  • Thousands of Scientific Papers May be Invalid Due to Misunderstanding Python

    It was recently discovered that several thousand scientific articles could be invalid in their conclusions because scientists did not understand that Python’s glob.glob() does not return sorted results. This is being reported on by Vice, Slashdot and there’s an interesting discussion going on over on Reddit as well.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News and Manjaro 19.09.28 KDE-DEV Run Through

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 165 - Grab Bag of Microsoft Security News

    Josh and Kurt about a number of Microsoft security news items. They've changed how they are handling encrypted disks and are now forcing cloud logins on Windows users.

  • Linux Action News 127

    Richard Stallman's GNU leadership is challenged by an influential group of maintainers, SUSE drops OpenStack "for the customer," and Google claims Stadia will be faster than a gaming PC. Plus OpenLibra aims to save us from Facebook but already has a miss, lousy news for Telegram, and enormous changes for AMP.

  • GNU World Order 13x42

    On the road during the **All Things Open** conference, Klaatu talks about how to make ebooks from various sources, with custom CSS, using the Pandoc command.

  • Manjaro 19.09.28 KDE-DEV Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Manjaro 19.09.28 KDE-DEV.

Apple of 2019 is the Linux of 2000

Last week the laptop I use for macOS development said that there is an XCode update available. I tried to install it but it said that there is not enough free space available to run the installer. So I deleted a bunch of files and tried again. Still the same complaint. Then I deleted some unused VM images. Those would free a few dozen gigabytes, so it should make things work. I even emptied the trash can to make sure nothing lingered around. But even this did not help, I still got the same complaint. At this point it was time to get serious and launch the terminal. And, true enough, according to df the disk had only 8 gigabytes of free space even though I had just deleted over 40 gigabytes of files from it (using rm, not the GUI, so things really should have been gone). A lot of googling and poking later I discovered that all the deleted files had gone to "reserved space" on the file system. There was no way to access those files or delete them. According to documentation the operating system would delete those files "on demand as more space is needed". This was not very comforting because the system most definitely was not doing that and you'd think that Apple's own software would get this right. After a ton more googling I managed to find a chat buried somewhere deep in Reddit which listed the magical indentation that purges reserved space. It consisted of running tmutil from the command line and giving it a bunch of command line arguments that did not seem to make sense or have any correlation to the thing that I wanted to do. But it did work and eventually I got XCode updated. After my blood pressure dropped to healthier levels I got the strangest feeling of déjà vu. This felt exactly like using Linux in the early 2000s. Things break at random for reasons you can't understand and the only way to fix it is to find terminal commands from discussion forums, type them in and hope for the best. Then it hit me. Read more