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Gaming

Steam and Wine in Steam Play

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Gaming
  • Steam for Linux now lets you play (some) Windows games on Linux

    Valve’s Steam game platform supports Windows, Mac, and Linux. But up until recently it was up to developers to decide which operating systems to support… and the vast majority are Windows-only, followed by a smaller number of apps that support macOS and around 3 thousand that support Linux.

    But now the number of Steam games available to Linux users is a little longer… not because developers have ported their games to support the operating system, but because Valve has launched a new version of Steam Play that makes is possible to play some Windows games on Linux computers.

  • Steam Can Now Run Some Major VR Apps Without Microsoft Windows

    Valve released an update for Steam on Linux that should allow some of the most popular VR games to run on VR-ready computers without Microsoft Windows installed.

    The new feature could hold enormous potential for Valve to support next generation standalone VR headsets based on Linux or SteamOS. In the near-term, the feature could also lower the cost for some early adopters who want to enjoy top tier games like Doom VFR, Google Earth VR and Beat Saber but don’t feel like shelling out the cost for a Windows 10 license alongside their shiny new VR-ready PC. It might also have an effect on VR arcades which could bypass the cost of Microsoft’s operating system.

    The new feature is described as follows: “Windows games with no Linux version currently available can now be installed and run directly from the Linux Steam client, complete with native Steamworks and OpenVR support.”

  • Valve makes Windows games playable on Linux with Steam Play update

    Heads up developers, if your players have been asking for a Linux-compatable version of your game, Valve's announced that delivering that version should be much easier going forward.

    In a post on the Steam community forums, Valve representative Pierre-Loup Griffais announced that Valve is releasing a new version of Steam play that includes a new feature for Linux users. Using an improved version of the compatibility software Wine known as Proton, Griffais states that Linux users can now play games on Steam that are meant to run on Windows.

  • Steam gets built-in tools to let you run Windows games on Linux – now available in beta

    Valve’s name for its cross-platform initiative – is getting a major update, with built-in tools allowing you to run Windows games on Linux. We saw the first hints of the feature last week, and today Valve has confirmed it. It’s available right now in beta, so if you want to test the compatibility features on your own Linux install you don’t have to wait.

  • Steam adds Proton, making Windows games playable on Linux (at least in theory)

    Last week we wrote about Valve potentially folding support for a WINE-style compatibility wrapper into Steam, allowing Linux machines to play Windows games with minimal hiccups. Now it’s a reality. Valve’s Pierre-Loup Griffais made the announcement on the “Steam for Linux” group today.

    The forum post is long and very detailed, and if you’re personally invested in Linux gaming it’s probably worth a read.

  • Steam Play beta lets Linux gamers play some Windows-only titles

    There were whispers about it just last week but now it’s totally official. Steam Play, which was originally intended as a single-purchase system for buying games that run on Windows, Mac, and Linux, is taking cross-platform compatibility to the next level. Yes, Valve is now testing running Windows games on Steam on Linux. And, much to the satisfaction of Linux and open source advocates, it’s doing it the right way by building on and supporting initiatives that will benefit not just Steam but the entire Linux ecosystem as well.

Games: GOG, Radiis, Humble Spooky Horror Bundle 2018, Steam Play

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Gaming
  • Grab your Harpoon as Nantucket is now available for Linux on GOG

    Nantucket, the rather interesting seafaring strategy game from Picaresque Studio now has a Linux version on GOG that was released today. The Linux version was officially released earlier this month after a few months of being in beta, so it's good to see a GOG release have a reasonably quick turnaround.

  • Strategy game Radiis has no moving units, only buildings and it's out now

    If you're after a strategy game that brings things back to basics and has no moving units, take a look at Radiis. Developed by Urban Goose Games and release last month, Radiis will have you conquer a map using only buildings and it strangely works.

  • The Humble Spooky Horror Bundle 2018 is live with three Linux games

    The Humble Spooky Horror Bundle 2018 just launched and while it doesn't have all titles on Linux, what it does have for us is good.

  • Valve’s “Steam Play” uses Vulkan to bring more Windows games to Linux

    Valve announced today a beta of Steam Play, a new compatibility layer for Linux to provide compatibility with a wide range of Windows-only games.

    We've been tracking Valve's efforts to boost Linux gaming for a number of years. As of a few months ago, things seemed to have gone very quiet, with Valve removing SteamOS systems from its store. Last week, however, it became clear that something was afoot for Linux gaming.

    The announcement today spells out in full what the company has developed. At its heart is a customized, modified version of the WINE Windows-on-Linux compatibility layer named Proton. Compatibility with Direct3D graphics is provided by vkd3d, an implementation of Direct3D 12 that uses Vulkan for high performance, and DXVK, a Vulkan implementation of Direct3D 11.

Play Games From Your Nvidia GameStream-Enabled PC On Your Linux Desktop With Moonlight

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Gaming

Moonlight (or Moonlight Game Streaming) is an open source client implementation of Nvidia's GameStream that allows you to stream your games and applications from a GameStream-compatible PC to another device, be it another Windows computer, a macOS or Linux desktop, Chrome OS, or an Android or iOS device.

Read more

Also: Wine Staging 3.14 Released With Nearly 900 Patches In Total

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • The Linux version of Graveyard Keeper is now available on GOG

    Need to hide a few bodies? Graveyard Keeper is now available for Linux on GOG after being missed at the release.

    It was actually added a day or so after the initial release. Sometimes the Linux version is missing when a game is released on GOG, as the Linux team at GOG discover issues in it. The game did indeed have some pressing issues at release, a fair few have been fixed now so it is quite a bit better.

  • Life is Strange 2 officially revealed with a new trailer

    While we don't yet know about Linux support, I will honestly be shocked if Feral Interactive didn't port Life is Strange 2. Especially since they ported the original to Linux and are currently porting Before the Storm which is a little delayed.

  • The Jackbox Party Pack 5 now has a Steam page and it's going to release with Linux support

    Currently scheduled to release "Fall 2018", The Jackbox Party Pack 5 is the latest pack of crazy party games from Jackbox Games, Inc. and it should be coming out with Linux support.

  • Combat helicopters are coming to War Thunder in the next update

    Gaijin Entertainment have announced that combat helicopters are coming to War Thunder [Steam, Official Site] along with a teaser trailer.

  • The action RPG Underworld Ascendant is now releasing in November

    The action RPG Underworld Ascendant [Official Site] from OtherSide Entertainment is now going to release on November 15th and they have a new trailer. They previously said it would be September, so hopefully the extra time will make it a better game.

    Last we heard from them, they were still planning Linux support although they didn't have a specific date nailed down for the Linux version just yet, so do keep that in mind.

  • Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night delayed again, this time until 2019

    Not for the first time, Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night has been delayed and will now launch in 2019.

    Writing in a Kickstarter update, they confirmed it's to increase the quality of the game as a whole after they gathered feedback from a special backer demo. Delays sadly happen and if we can get a decent game out of this then I will be happy. Hopefully it will give them time to ensure the Linux version is nicely polished too. The Vita version was cancelled along with this announcement.

  • Die for Valhalla! is an action RPG that has you possess enemies and objects

    A supernatural Valkyrie with the ability to possess things, what could possibly go wrong? Go ahead and Die for Valhalla!

    Released back at the end of May with full Linux support, Die for Valhalla! offers an action-RPG with single-player and local co-op options for up to four people.

  • BATTLETECH has an expansion named FLASHPOINT coming out this November

    Even though they still haven't managed to get the Linux version out yet, Harebrained Schemes and Paradox Interactive have announced the FLASHPOINT expansion for BATTLETECH. As a reminder, we spoke to the developer earlier this month about the Linux version which they do hope to release soon.

Nintendo Wii on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
  • Nintendo Wii's Guitar/Drums Will Work On The Linux 4.19 Kernel Plus Totem & Surface Dial

    Going back to 2011 there's been a Nintendo Wii remote "Wiimote" driver in the Linux kernel but this unofficial hardware driver hasn't worked with some of the devices that can interface with the Wiimote like devices for Rock Band and Guitar Hero. In 2018, that's now changed with the in-development Linux 4.19 kernel.

  • Updated HID Drivers in Linux 4.19 Kernel Support Wiimote Instruments for Rock Band and Guitar Hero

    It would appear that a “Wiimote” driver has existed in the Linux kernel for the Nintendo Wii remote since 2011, but being an unofficial hardware driver, it hasn’t exactly worked with some of the devices that can interface with the Wiimite such as the instruments for Rock Band and Guitar Hero. Well, guess what? Now it does, thanks to some development in that regards on the Linux 4.19 kernel.

    Even though the Nintendo Wii is discontinued for several years now, a Linux developer has gotten the guitar and drum kits for Guitar Hero and Rock Band to work with the Wiimote while attached to Linux. The method is based on some never-mainlined patches from a few years ago, but the patches have been updated to work with the latest kernel / HID interfaces.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming

Games: Planetary Annihilation, La-Mulana 2, SteamOS

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Gaming

DXVK 0.70 is out with support for Direct3D 10 over Vulkan in Wine

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Gaming
  • DXVK 0.70 is out with support for Direct3D 10 over Vulkan in Wine

    DXVK [GitHub] continues the amazing progress towards helping Linux gamers play their favourite Windows-only games on Linux.

    Just released minutes ago, DXVK 0.70 adds in the previously announced Direct3D 10 support (more info here). In addition to this, it also adds in support for the D3D11.1 ClearView method and D3D11.1 extended double instructions.

  • DXVK 0.70 Released With Initial Direct3D 10 Over Vulkan Support

    Just in time for any weekend Linux gamers, a new release of DXVK is available that maps the Direct3D API to Vulkan for allowing faster Windows gaming performance under Wine.

    DXVK started out with a focus on supporting the Direct3D 11 API and it's been doing a wonderful job at supporting a massive collection of D3D11 Windows games running at great speeds under Wine+DXVK thanks to Vulkan. Recently it started adding Direct3D 10 support using a small wrapper. With today's DXVK 0.70, it's the initial release that includes this preliminary Direct3D 10 support.

Games: Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark, Orwell, Megaquarium, Moonlighter

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Gaming

Games: Tropico 6, 7 Billion Humans, CrossCode, Evergarden

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Fedora News and Red Hat's Finances

Steam and Wine in Steam Play

  • Steam for Linux now lets you play (some) Windows games on Linux
    Valve’s Steam game platform supports Windows, Mac, and Linux. But up until recently it was up to developers to decide which operating systems to support… and the vast majority are Windows-only, followed by a smaller number of apps that support macOS and around 3 thousand that support Linux. But now the number of Steam games available to Linux users is a little longer… not because developers have ported their games to support the operating system, but because Valve has launched a new version of Steam Play that makes is possible to play some Windows games on Linux computers.
  • Steam Can Now Run Some Major VR Apps Without Microsoft Windows
    Valve released an update for Steam on Linux that should allow some of the most popular VR games to run on VR-ready computers without Microsoft Windows installed. The new feature could hold enormous potential for Valve to support next generation standalone VR headsets based on Linux or SteamOS. In the near-term, the feature could also lower the cost for some early adopters who want to enjoy top tier games like Doom VFR, Google Earth VR and Beat Saber but don’t feel like shelling out the cost for a Windows 10 license alongside their shiny new VR-ready PC. It might also have an effect on VR arcades which could bypass the cost of Microsoft’s operating system. The new feature is described as follows: “Windows games with no Linux version currently available can now be installed and run directly from the Linux Steam client, complete with native Steamworks and OpenVR support.”
  • Valve makes Windows games playable on Linux with Steam Play update
    Heads up developers, if your players have been asking for a Linux-compatable version of your game, Valve's announced that delivering that version should be much easier going forward. In a post on the Steam community forums, Valve representative Pierre-Loup Griffais announced that Valve is releasing a new version of Steam play that includes a new feature for Linux users. Using an improved version of the compatibility software Wine known as Proton, Griffais states that Linux users can now play games on Steam that are meant to run on Windows.
  • Steam gets built-in tools to let you run Windows games on Linux – now available in beta
    Valve’s name for its cross-platform initiative – is getting a major update, with built-in tools allowing you to run Windows games on Linux. We saw the first hints of the feature last week, and today Valve has confirmed it. It’s available right now in beta, so if you want to test the compatibility features on your own Linux install you don’t have to wait.
  • Steam adds Proton, making Windows games playable on Linux (at least in theory)
    Last week we wrote about Valve potentially folding support for a WINE-style compatibility wrapper into Steam, allowing Linux machines to play Windows games with minimal hiccups. Now it’s a reality. Valve’s Pierre-Loup Griffais made the announcement on the “Steam for Linux” group today. The forum post is long and very detailed, and if you’re personally invested in Linux gaming it’s probably worth a read.
  • Steam Play beta lets Linux gamers play some Windows-only titles
    There were whispers about it just last week but now it’s totally official. Steam Play, which was originally intended as a single-purchase system for buying games that run on Windows, Mac, and Linux, is taking cross-platform compatibility to the next level. Yes, Valve is now testing running Windows games on Steam on Linux. And, much to the satisfaction of Linux and open source advocates, it’s doing it the right way by building on and supporting initiatives that will benefit not just Steam but the entire Linux ecosystem as well.

Security: X.Org Server, USBHarpoon, Kubernetes Penetration Testing

  • Three New Security Advisories Hit X.Org's X11 Library
    It's been a while since last having any big security bulletins for the X.Org Server even though some of the code-base dates back decades and security researchers have said the security is even worse than it looks and numerous advisories have come up in recent years. But it's not because X11 is bug-free as today three more security bulletins were made public affecting libX11. Today's security advisory pertains to three different functions in libX11 that are affected by different issues. The security issues come down to off-by-one writes, a potential out of boundary write, and a crash on invalid reply.
  • USBHarpoon: How “Innocent” USB Cables Can Be Manipulated To Inject Malware
    Back in 2014 Black Hat Conference, crypto specialists Karsten Nohl and Jakob Lell introduced the concept of BadUSB — a USB security flaw which allows attackers to turn a USB into a keyboard which can be used to type in commands. Now, a researcher from SYON Security has managed to build a modified USB charging cable that will enable hackers to transfer malware on your PC without you even noticing it. Behind the hood is the BadUSB vulnerability. [...] While BadUSB is gradually climbing the ladder towards the mainstream cyber attacks, people are also coming up with the corresponding firewalls to tackle the new age attacks.
  • Open Source 'Kube-Hunter' Does Kubernetes Penetration Testing
    Aqua Security released the open source kube-hunter tool for penetration testing of Kubernetes clusters, used for container orchestration. "You give it the IP or DNS name of your Kubernetes cluster, and kube-hunter probes for security issues -- it's like automated penetration testing," the company said in an Aug. 15 blog post. The tool -- with source code available on GitHub -- is also packaged by the company in a containerized version, which works with the company's kube-hunter Web site where test results can be seen and shared.

Linux-Friendly Hardware From Tranquil PC and Aaeon

  • Rugged, Linux-ready mini-PC showcases Ryzen V1000
    Tranquil PC open pre-orders on a fanless, barebones “Mini Multi Display PC” mini-PC with AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC, 4x simultaneous 4K DisplayPort displays, 2x GbE, and up to 32GB DDR4 and 1TB storage. Manchester, UK based Tranquil PC has launched the first mini-PC based on the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000. The Mini Multi Display PC is named for the Ryzen V1000’s ability to simultaneously drive four 4K displays, a feature supported here with 4x DisplayPorts. The NUC-like, aluminum frame system is moderately rugged, with 0 to 40°C support and IP50 protection.
  • Apollo Lake Pico-ITX SBC has dual GbE ports and plenty of options
    Aaeon’s Apollo Lake powered “PICO-APL4” SBC offers a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, and M.2 connections plus HDMI, SATA III, and up to 64GB eMMC. Aaeon has spun another Pico-ITX form-factor SBC featuring Intel Apollo Lake processors, following the PICO-APL3 and earlier PICO-APL1. Unlike those SBCs, the new PICO-APL4 has dual Gigabit Ethernet ports, among other minor changes.