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Gaming

Games: Capcom's FOSS Anomaly and 'Interrogation' Coming to GNU/Linux

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OSS
Gaming
  • Capcom Home Arcade is a plug-and-play arcade stick with 16 games

    Capcom is getting in on the “classic” game bandwagon, announcing the Capcom Home Arcade, a €229.99 plug-and-play arcade system featuring support for two players and including 16 classic titles. If that price seems high to you, relative to emulator-based offerings from Nintendo, or even the FPGA-based solutions from Analogue, then ... you’d be right. In exchange for roughly $260, you do get genuine Sanwa joystick parts, and emulation courtesy of the well-respected, open source FB Alpha emulator.

  • The Emulator In Capcom's Home Arcade Is Stirring Controversy

    Its website markets the Capcom Home Arcade as an “authentic gaming” experience, in part because it utilizes the original arcade ROMs for games like Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting and Alien Vs. Predator and runs them with FB Alpha, an arcade emulator known for its snappy response times. As those in the emulation community were quick to point out, however, FB Alpha is open-source, and distributed under a license that strictly forbids people from trying to profit off of it.

  • Interrogation reveals 2019 release for Windows, Mac and Linux

    Getting a criminal suspect to crack under pressure isn't nearly as easy as TV makes it look. In indie Romanian developer Critique Gaming's upcoming Interrogation, players will find that out firsthand, needing all their conversational wiles if they're to bring down a growing terrorist organization.

Nvidia Uses "Open Source" for Marketing of Expensive Hardware

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
OSS
Gaming
  • Nvidia to publish open source version of Quake II RTX

    HEXUS shared the Quake II RTX video as an appendage to the news about real-time raytracing coming to the GTX 1060 or higher, back in March, during the GTC 2019 event. In brief, the video was presented by Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang during the opening keynote of GTC 2019. The demo's real-time ray traced global illumination and reflections, HDR visuals, dynamic direct and indirect lighting effects, mimicked physical material light reflection properties, and volumetric lighting effects were met with rapturous applause by GTC attendees.

  • NVIDIA To Transform Quake II RTX Demo Into An Open Source Retro Gaming Classic

    Applause broke out from the crowd at GTC 2019 when NVIDIA showcased a modded version of Quake II with overhauled graphics featuring real-time ray tracing and HDR visuals. Quake II RTX, as it is called, looks almost like a completely different game than the original version that launched over two decades ago. It was an impressive demo for sure, but NVIDIA has bigger plans for the mod.

    "Our goal is to publish an open source version of Quake II RTX," Principal DevTech Engineer and Quake II RTX's lead programmer, Alexey Panteleev, told AusGamers in an interview.

  • NVIDIA To Release Open Source Version Of The Quake II RTX Demo In The Future

    Last month, during GDC 2019, NVIDIA showed an impressive Quake II RTX demo, which showed how ray tracing can improve even old games, and it seems like players will soon be able to experience it for themselves.

    Speaking with Aus Gamers, Alexey Panteleev, the lead programmer of the Quake II RTX demo, confirmed that an open source version of it will be released in the future.

SuperTuxKart 1.0 Release

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Gaming
  • SuperTuxKart 1.0 Release

    Yes, if you have followed our development a bit, that might be a bit of a surprise. But we have been asked why we don't call this release 1.0, and the majority of us developers discussed this and decided that indeed this release is a major milestone that deserves the big 1.0 number.

  • SuperTuxKart 1.0 Released For Open-Source Linux Racing

    SuperTuxKart, the open-source racing game inspired by Mario Kart and themed around Linux/Tux, has reached its 1.0 version after being in development the past 12+ years.

    SuperTuxKart 1.0 has been released now that there is networking support for SuperTuxKart for competitive racing across LANs or the Internet. The networking support isn't yet perfect but is quite suitable and has come together nicely in recent months.

Games: Lutris and More

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Gaming
  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris

    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro.

    The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines.

    Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.

  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package

    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.

  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart

    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.

  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby

    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit.

    Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.

Games: Danger Gazers, Sid Meier's Civilization VI and Steam

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Gaming
  • Post-apocalyptic roguelite shooter 'Danger Gazers' enters Early Access next week, early thoughts

    I'm honestly not quite sure what to make of Danger Gazers, a top-down roguelite shooter that mixes Nuclear Throne style gameplay with node-based level picking.

  • Sid Meier's Civilization VI updated again, Linux client back in sync for cross-platform play

    Aspyr Media managed to get the latest update to Sid Meier's Civilization VI for Linux approved and it's out now.

    While it was again not ideal that Linux (and Mac) gamers were left waiting, this time wasn't so bad. The Great Works and Trade Update was released on April 11th "addressing issues that have emerged in the community following the release of the Antarctic Late Summer Game Update" and we now have it.

    Thankfully, this means the Linux version is once again able to play online cross-platform with both Windows and Mac.

  • Valve's Proton 4.2-3 Released With Wine-Mono Integration Plus DXVK 1.0.3, Updated FAudio

    Following last month's Proton 4.2 for Steam Play that is derived from Wine 4.2 with many patches applied, Proton 4.2-3 has been released for the latest Windows gaming on Linux experience ahead of any Easter weekend gaming time.

    Proton 4.2-3 was just released by Valve as the newest update to their fork of Wine that bundles in DXVK, FAudio, and many other patches for improving the experience of running Windows games on Linux under Steam.

  • Valve released a stable Steam Client update yesterday, some nice fixes in for Linux and Steam Play

    Valve are continuing their polishing effort to make the Steam Client work better, with a load of work from the recent Beta releases now out for everyone.

    This Steam Client update includes an updated version of their embedded Chromium build, it adds in a Big Picture Mode library filter for local multiplayer games, multiple changes to Steam Input including a new "Controller Connected" notification (which can be turned off), the ability to blacklist individual DirectInput and Xinput devices in the controller settings menu, improvements to in-home streaming, Vulkan pipeline dumping and collection if Shader Pre-Caching is enabled and more.

    As I understand it, the Vulkan part above is so the shader cache for a Vulkan game can be uploaded to Steam and shared, so we would hopefully see less stuttering which would be a big improvement.

  • Steam Play just got two updates with 4.2-3 and 3.16-9, some great stuff included

    Valve and CodeWeavers are doing some great work for Linux gaming, with Steam Play seeing two updates in a single day.

    Firstly, the older Proton series got updated to 3.16-9 which includes mostly minor changes like an updated DXVK to 1.0.2, a fix for some games failing or crashing in certain locales and fixes to minor xaudio2 and winhttp bugs.

    Onto the real goodies now, as Proton 4.2-3 is also available today with some major changes included!

    The first one is the inclusion of wine-mono, which they said should enable "many XNA games, Unreal Engine 3 games, game launchers, and more" to work. That's pretty big by itself, so it will be very interesting to see just how many more games become playable with Steam Play thanks to this.

Ubuntu 19.04 Radeon Linux Gaming Performance: Popular Desktops Benchmarked, Wayland vs. X.Org

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Leading up to the Ubuntu 19.04 release, several premium supporters requested fresh results for seeing the X.Org vs. Wayland performance overhead for gaming, how GNOME Shell vs. KDE Plasma is performing for current AMD Linux gaming, and related desktop comparison graphics/gaming metrics. Here are such benchmarks run from the Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" while benchmarking GNOME Shell both with X.Org and Wayland, Xfce, MATE, Budgie, KDE Plasma, LXQt, and Openbox.

Using a Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics card with the stock Ubuntu 19.04 components were used for this desktop graphics/gaming benchmark comparison. Ubuntu 19.04 ships with the Linux 5.0 kernel, Mesa 19.0.2, and X.Org Server 1.20.4 as the most prominent components for this comparison. GNOME Shell 3.32.0, Xfce 4.12, MATE 1.20.4, KDE Plasma 5.15.4, Budgie, LXQt 0.14.1, and Openbox 3.6.1 are the prominent desktop versions to report. KDE Plasma with Wayland wasn't tested since on this system I wasn't able to successfully start the session when selecting the Wayland version of Plasma from the log-in manager. The Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics card was running from the common Core i9 9900K used by many of our graphics tests with the ASUS PRIME Z390-A motherboard, 16GB of RAM, Samsung 970 EVO 256GB NVMe SSD, and a 4K display.

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Games: Godot Game Engine, King Arthur's Gold, Rocket League, Rotation, Crumble, Superbug Initiative for Two Point Hospital, Lutris

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Gaming
  • Create Games With Godot Game Engine

    Are you considering creating a game in your free spare time or as a full-time game developer? You should check out Godot if you want a FOSS game engine on your Linux machine. There are tons of open source game engines and of course including those proprietary ones that most people use and talk about (for instance, Unity). Godot is fairly new but that doesn't mean it's poor in features. It's the opposite! Read on below to learn more about this awesome game engine.

  • King Arthur's Gold, the 2D multiplayer castle siege game is now free to play

    With some silly physics and plenty of fun to be had, King Arthur's Gold has officially gone free to play and it works great on Linux.

  • Rocket League has a new Rocket Pass out with a Weekly Challenges system

    It seems developer Psyonix is taking more inspiration from Fortnite for Rocket League with their latest Rocket Pass out now.

    For those that aren't too clued up, the Rocket Pass is a newer system in Rocket League that has both a free and paid tier allowing you to unlock new cosmetic items at different levels. Those who don't pay get a reduced amount but if you pay each time a new Rocket Pass comes out, every single level of the Rocket Pass will give you something.

  • Rotation looks like a promising and unique top-down shooter coming to Linux

    I do love a good action-packed top-down shooter but a lot of them do end up feeling a little too similar, Rotation looks like it might mix things up nicely.

  • Silly physics platformer where you swing with your tongue 'Crumble' now has a Linux demo

    In the 3D platformer Crumble, you play as a rolling ball with a smiley face and a loose tongue. It sounds ridiculous and it is but it's also good fun.

    A game I gave a quick shout-out to recently as the idea and trailer made it sound quite amusing, the developer emailed in recently to let me know that the demo is now available on Linux for everyone to give it ago. After now playing it myself, I seriously can't wait to see more from it.

  • Two Point Hospital's Superbug Initiative brings a new challenge system, beta now available

    The Superbug Initiative for Two Point Hospital sees players working together across the world, to complete challenges.

    These challenges can be done with friends or in larger global projects. It works by progressing through nodes of different challenges like training staff or earning a specific amount of money, with the end result once you've fully completed each line of nodes being some special in-game reward. It's a feature they will continue updating, to add in more challenges and rewards to give players more reasons to keep coming back to the game which sounds pretty fun.

  • You can now easily run the Epic Store on Linux with Lutris, Epic suggests applying for a grant

    Thanks to some effort from the team behind Lutris (and Wine of course), you can now run the Epic Store quite easily on Linux.

Games: Flotilla, Oxygen Not Included and More

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Gaming

Games: Caves of Qud, Shipped, Origami Flight and Train Valley 2

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Gaming
  • Caves of Qud, the crazy-deep roguelike is having a price increase this week so act fast

    Caves of Qud from Freehold Games is a roguelike with some truly ridiculous depth to it and after many years of development they're going to be upping the price on April 18th.

    Currently available for around $9.99, the new price is going to be set at $14.99 which isn't a huge increase but it's worth letting you know now in case you were on the fence about buying it.

  • Shipped is a surprisingly fun local multiplayer naval game that might destroy some friendships

    Shipped from developer Majorariatto is a game I could easily have passed by, a shame too as I've found it to be incredibly fun.

    Why would I pass up on it? Well, it really doesn't look like much and honestly I didn't even know it existed until the developer sent over a copy to our Steam Curator. I'm not saying it looks bad, not at all, just the incredible simple style and description of it doesn't make it stand out amongst the big crowd of games being released recently.

  • Side-scrolling shoot 'em up 'Origami Flight' now supports Linux

    Origami Flight is a side-scrolling shoot 'em up where you're literally playing as a paper aeroplane and you're trying to save the Origami World.

  • The great distribution puzzle game 'Train Valley 2' has officially released

    Train Valley 2, a distribution puzzle game needing you to keep trains running on time and with the correct resources across each level is now out.

    After being in Early Access since early last year, they've continued to expand and refine the game into a really fantastic experience overall. Not just enough that it has around 50 levels, there's also a built-in level editor with Steam Workshop support giving access to hundreds of user-created challenges.

Introducing Unity 2019.1

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Gaming

In the next few weeks we will also release the 2018.4 Long-Term Support (LTS) version of Unity for those of you with projects about to ship and thus who wish to lock-in their production on a rock-solid foundation for an extended period.

Unity 2019.1 is packed with more than 283 new features and improvements. At the beginning of this post you will find a summary, followed by a detailed walk-through, of the major new features. If you’re eager to install and begin using Unity 2019.1, consider starting the download (click the button below or access via the Unity Hub) while you read this post.

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Also: Unity 2019.1 Released With Linux & Vulkan Improvements, Lightweight Render Pipeline

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Review: Alpine Linux 3.9.2

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