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Gaming

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Surviving Mars’ upcoming “Opportunity” update will be adding several goodies based on player feedback

    The next big patch for the strategy title is in the works. The developers have shared a little of what we can expect and it’s looking good.

    [...]

    It’s a generally fun game that runs pretty well on Linux and I’ve personally sunk in about 30 hours since launch

  • Some thoughts on Pawarumi, a stylish and action-packed shoot ‘em up

    This eye-catching shoot ‘em up mixes constant action with Mesoamerican motifs and a story about revenge. I stuck with it despite dying a large amount of times and have some thoughts to share about the game.

  • Sega Is Bringing 15 Classic Games, Including Sonic, to the Switch This Summer

    There was a time when we thought that the Switch would be a perfect fit for the Virtual Console. While we wait for Nintendo to bring classic games to the Switch, Sega is already on the case.

    At a Sega fan event in Japan, the company announced the new Sega Ages initiative. Under this banner, the game developer will release titles for the Nintendo Switch, including the original Sonic the Hedgehog, Phantasy Star, and Thunder Force 4, starting this summer. The company said over fifteen games would be released on the platform, but only had these three titles to share so far. No word yet on whether the vastly superior later Sonic games will also be included.

Linux and the beauty of browser-based games

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Linux
Gaming

Judged across all platforms and architectures, Linux is the most popular operating system on the planet, surpassing even Microsoft Windows. But one aspect of computing that the open source operating has trailed the Windows operating system is desktop gaming, where Linux only occupies a small percentage of the (desktop) market. As a result many of the most popular Windows desktop games are not available on Linux. So Windows users contemplating switching to Linux must first answer this question: Is my favorite Windows desktop game available on Linux?

Read more

Games: BATTLETECH, Rust, Rocket League, Wine

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Gaming

Games: Ryan Gordon, Voxel Turf, System Shock

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Gaming
  • Ryan Gordon Is Working On MojoAL, Adds Spatialized Audio Support

    Ryan Gordon's new MojoAL sound library now supports audio spatialization.

    MojoAL is the newest open-source project being maintained by macOS/Linux game porter Ryan "Icculus" Gordon. MojoAL is an SDL-based OpenAL implementation that aims to be a drop-in replacement to this long-standing, cross-platform audio API library that was originally started by his former employer, Loki Entertainment. While OpenAL continues to be maintained by the likes of Apple and Creative, MojoAL is a new replacement being hacked on by Icculus.

  • Voxel Turf just had a huge update, the AI can now build cities and hired goons can be given orders

    Voxel Turf [Steam], the urban sandbox that's a little like Minecraft with elements of a city-builder and GTA has just had a huge update.

  • Nightdive Studios show off how System Shock is returning to the original vision

    I'm sure plenty were worried about the break Nightdive Studios were taking with the new System Shock reboot, however this latest Kickstarter update sounds promising.

    In the update, Stephen Kick, CEO of Nightdive Studios notes how they've let go a few developers while keeping a "concentrated team" full of people who worked on the original Unity demo. Kick himself has even taken over as game director, so hopefully he can get everyone to stick to their vision of the original System Shock.

Games: The Wastes, Ballistic Overkill, Ion Maiden, RUINER

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Gaming
  • The Wastes is a classic inspired fast-paced multiplayer FPS that's now out

    The Wastes [Steam] is a fast-paced multiplayer FPS revamp of an old Half-Life mod released in 2000 of the same name, rebuilt with id Tech 3.

  • The fun FPS 'Ballistic Overkill' adds more female skins, free to try for a few days and 50% off

    Ballistic Overkill is a fun and cheap FPS that I've put many hours into, it's now free to try for a few days and on sale with 50% off if you decide to keep it. The game has been out for a year now (minus a little time for the Linux build), so they're celebrating.

  • FPS Ion Maiden updated with a new game mode and OpenGL optimisations

    Are you enjoying the retro inspired FPS Ion Maiden? Time to jump back in as the latest update is rather great.

    The current game is only a preview of what's to come, even so they seem to be committed to supporting it and keeping it up to date. While they're working to finish off the full game, they just push out quite an interesting update. Specifically, they optimized and eliminated mid-game texture streaming and generation, improved the overall OpenGL renderer performance and did more scripting optimizations. Together, these have made the game perform quite a lot smoother in my testing.

  • RUINER is looking good on Linux, official non-beta build due on Monday

    RUINER, the brutal action shooter from Reikon Games recently arrived on Linux in beta and it's looking really good. It just received a fresh update, which the developer said fixes most of the reported issues, although they're still working on the issue of the in-game videos being in very low quality. On top of that, they're aiming for an official non-beta release on Monday!

Games: GameMode, Shovel Knight: Treasure Trove, GOG, Glitchspace, The Spatials: Galactology

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Gaming

Games: For The King and More

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Gaming

Games: Privacy Settings in Steam and GNU/Linux in Humble Strategy Bundle

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Gaming
  • Valve Offers Up New Privacy Settings For Steam Gamers

    In wake of recent privacy scandals in the tech world, Valve is now offering new privacy settings for Steam users.

    The expanded Profile Privacy Settings Page offers greater control of what Steam account information is shared publicly, including what can be accessed by Steam friends or publicly to others on Steam. There are now controls over who can view your game details, the ability to keep total game playtime privacy, and more.

  • New Profile Privacy Settings
  • Steam revamps profile privacy settings, Steam Spy no longer able to operate

    While I was asleep Valve announced some new profile privacy settings which are good for users, but it seems Steam Spy is likely going to shut down as a result.

  • The Humble Strategy Bundle has a few interesting Linux games

    Love your strategy games? You can pick up a few that support Linux in the latest Humble Strategy Bundle (affiliate link). I will only note the games that support Linux, as there's a bunch that don't.

    For $1 you will get Planetary Annihilation: TITANS and some Company of Heroes 2 DLC designed for the WDC charity.

Games: Steam Machines and Feral GameMode

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Gaming
  • Valve should stick to Linux for Steam Machines: here’s why

    Steam Machines have failed, at least commercially. There’s hardly any argument there. Even Valve itself admits as much. Valve, however, would not concede defeat and promises to remain committed to pushing Linux gaming forward. Some might see it as simple lip service to calm SteamOS fans. Others might see it as a pointless endeavor and business suicide. And yet, if Valve’s dreams are to become reality, it really doesn’t have much choice to stick to its Linux guns for the long term and these are the reasons why.

  • Feral has created a new frame-rate boosting mode for Linux games

    Feral Interactive, the outfit responsible for bringing titles such as Hitman to Linux, has released a new open source tool which is designed to ensure that Linux users get the best performance from its games.

  • A Quick Look At Feral GameMode / P-State Powersave vs. Performance

    With today's release of the Feral GameMode library/daemon of course I am running some benchmarks... Here is some initial numbers while this has spurred some fresh benchmarks looking at the P-State vs. CPUFreq performance and their respective frequency scaling governor options.

    I will be doing some fresh Linux gaming benchmarks using P-State/CPUFreq and their governor options while testing with both Radeon and GeForce graphics cards. First up is the Intel Core i7 8700K tests to be followed by similar AMD Ryzen tests with CPUFreq.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu-Based ExTiX Distro, the Ultimate Linux System, Updates Its Deepin Edition

Based on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, the ExTiX 18.4 Deepin Edition is now available and it ships updated components, including the latest Deepin 15.5 Desktop, the Calamares 3.1.12 universal installer framework, and a custom Linux 4.16.2 kernel with extra hardware support. "I’ve made a new extra version of ExTiX with Deepin 15.5 Desktop (made in China!)," said Arne Exton in the release announcement. "Only a minimum of packages is installed in ExTiX Deepin. You can, of course, install all the packages you want, even while running ExTiX Deepin live, i.e. from a DVD or USB stick." Read more

Stable kernels 4.16.4, 4.14.36, 4.9.96, 4.4.129 and 3.18.106

Things You Should Know About Ubuntu 18.04

This article answers frequently asked questions about Ubuntu 18.04 and thus informing you of the important things you should know about Ubuntu 18.04. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Discovery of Terminal app for Chrome OS suggests future support for Linux software
    Chrome OS is a fairly flexible operating system, and its support for Android apps via the Google Play Store opens up a world of software. It has been thought -- and hoped -- for some time that Linux support might be on its way, and this is looking increasingly likely. A Terminal app has appeared in the Chrome OS dev channel, strongly suggesting that support for Linux applications could well be on the horizon -- something which will give Chromebooks a new appeal.
  • Put Wind into your Deployments with Kubernetes and Helm
    I’m a Software Engineer. Every day, I come into work and write code. That’s what I’m paid to do. As I write my code, I need to be confident that it’s of the highest quality. I can test it locally, but anyone who’s ever heard the words, “...but it works on my machine,” knows that’s not enough. There are huge differences between my local environment and my company’s production systems, both in terms of scale and integration with other components. Back in the day, production systems were complex, and setting them up required a deep knowledge of the underlying systems and infrastructure. To get a production-like environment to test my code, I would have to open a ticket with my IT department and wait for them to get to it and provision a new server (whether physical or virtual). This was a process that took a few days at best. That used to be OK when release cycles were several months apart. Today, it’s completely unacceptable.
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Environment Promises Much Better Wayland Support
    The adoption of the next-generation Wayland display server amongst Linux-based operating systems is slowly, but surely, changing the Linux world for better. While most of the popular GNU/Linux distributions out there are shy on adopting Wayland by default, major Linux desktop environments like GNOME and KDE continue to offer improved Wayland support with each new major release. KDE Plasma 5.13 is being worked on these days, and KDE developer Roman Gilg reported over the weekend on the progress, so far, on the Plasma Wayland component for the next major release, which looks to be pretty promising. One of the most significant changes implemented in Plasma Wayland for KDE Plasma 5.13 is the ability to run more Linux apps on the Wayland display manager, either as native Wayland clients or as Xwayland clients.
  • [Mageia] Weekly Roundup 2018 – Week 16
    Work on the LXQt packages is still ongoing; watch this space for Great Plasma Update news.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 524
  • Is English Wikipedia’s ‘rise and decline’ typical?
    The figure comes from “The Rise and Decline of an Open Collaboration System,” a well-known 2013 paper that argued that Wikipedia’s transition from rapid growth to slow decline in 2007 was driven by an increase in quality control systems. Although many people have treated the paper’s finding as representative of broader patterns in online communities, Wikipedia is a very unusual community in many respects. Do other online communities follow Wikipedia’s pattern of rise and decline? Does increased use of quality control systems coincide with community decline elsewhere?
  • Two DMV Startups Are Updating an Open Source Security System to Prevent Data Hacks
  • Comprehensive Android Binary Scans Find Known Security Vulnerabilities in 1 Out of Every 5 of the 700 Most Popular Apps on Google Play Store [Ed: Insignary is again badmouthing FOSS platforms as a form of marketing that's basically disguised as 'research' or 'study']
  • Ryzen Stability Issues Are Still Affecting Some FreeBSD Users
    While in recent months there have been some improvements to FreeBSD that have helped yield greater reliability in running AMD Ryzen processors on this BSD operating system, some users are still reporting hard to diagnose stability problems on FreeBSD. For some, FreeBSD on Ryzen is still leading to lock-ups, even while the system may be idle. Also making it hard to debug, for some they can trigger a lock-up within an hour of booting their system while for others they may be able to make it a week or two before hitting any stability problem.
  • 6 DevOps trends to watch in 2018
    Here at Loggly, we live and breathe logs and uncovering underlying data. It probably comes as no surprise that we’re passionate about the future of log analysis and metric monitoring. Communicating with key subject matter experts in the DevOps space plays an important role in helping us understand where the industry is headed.
  • Trouble in techno hippie paradise
    Another interesting point: while the number of people addicted to nicotine has been going down globally lately, the number of network addicts has outnumbered those by far now. And yet the long term effects of being online almost 24/365 have not yet been researched at all. The cigarette companies claimed that most doctors smoke. The IT industry claims it's normal to be online. What's your wakeup2smartphone time? Do you check email every day?