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Gaming

Software and Games: Calibre, Tooth And Tail, KDE Components Not Yet Ported to KF5, and TeX Live

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Software
Gaming
  • Calibre 3.4 Open-Source eBook Manager Makes Exporting of Books a Lot Easier

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal released today a new stable version of his popular, open-source and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software, Calibre 3.4.

    Calibre 3.4 is here only one week after the release of the 3.3 update, which means that it's not a major version and it only adds a few user interface improvements, along with the usual bug fixes. The most important thing introduced in Calibre 3.4 is the a new method of exporting books to your computer.

  • Tooth And Tail, a new RTS game from Pocketwatch Games looks awesome, confirmed for Linux

    Pocketwatch Games (Monaco: What's Yours Is Mine) have announced their new strategy game Tooth and Tail [Steam, GOG, Official Site]. Not only does it look awesome and unique, but I've also got confirmation that it will be on Linux.

  • The KDE Components Not Yet Ported To KDE Frameworks 5

    With the beta of KDE Applications 17.08 due next week, which is the last cycle where Qt4/kdelibs4-dependent components are still permitted, KDE developer Christoph Feck has generated a list of KDE software not yet ported over to Qt5/KF5.

    It's with KDE Applications 17.12 where only Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 applications will be bundled with finally closing the door to Qt4/KDE4 programs that have yet to be ported.

  • TeX Live contrib repository (re)new(ed)

    It is my pleasure to announce the renewal/rework/restart of the TeX Live contrib repository service. The repository is collecting packages that cannot enter TeX Live directly (mostly due to license reasons), but are free to distribute. The basic idea is to provide a repository mimicking Debian’s nonfree branch.

Gaming: Tangledeep, Escapists 2, The Lion's Song, Wonder Boy, Ioquake3

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Gaming

Games: Sudden Strike 4, Shakedown: Hawaii, Wonder Boy and More

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Gaming

Games: XCOM 2: War of the Chosen, Robothorium, Wonder Boy, and More

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Gaming

Games: Starship Theory, Unreal Engine, Unity 2017, and Steam Refunds

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Gaming
  • Starship Theory just launched a Linux version, developer looking for feedback

    Starship Theory [Steam], a ship building survival game that resembles FTL a little in style is now on Linux, it's currently unsupported as the developer seeks feedback.

  • Unreal Engine 4.17 Preview 1 Ships

    Epic Games has released the first public preview of the upcoming Unreal Engine 4.17 game engine upgrade.

  • Unity 2017 Game Engine Released [Ed: warning is due; it's Microsoft Mono inside.]

    Unity Tech has made available their first updated game engine released under the Unity 2017 branding as part of their new versioning scheme.

  • How One Game Developer Views Steam's Refund Policy As A Boon In The Face Of Over $4 Million In Refunds

    It's been a little over a year since the Steam platform finally rolled out a true refund program for digital game purchases, with Microsoft quickly following suit. While gamers rejoiced at the news that every game purchase wasn't some form of a gamble, game developers reacted in a range generally between being nonplussed to vocally angry or fearful. The overall concern was that this move to shift the balance of Steam's supportive stance towards the consumer and away from the game developer would negatively impact the bottom line of developers now faced with a negative column in their sales metrics.

Games: DOSBox, Dark Forces, Dungeon Kingdom, Geocore, Terroir and More

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Gaming

Games: Unity, Pathfinder: Kingmaker, Golf for Workgroups and More

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Gaming

Games: Latest SteamOS Beta, Games That Come to GNU/Linux, and Wine 2.12

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Gaming

NVIDIA OpenGL vs. Vulkan CPU Core Scaling For Linux Gaming

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

At the end of June I posted some Vulkan vs. OpenGL Linux Game CPU Core Scaling using RADV/RadeonSI with a Polaris graphics card. At that time I also carried out some NVIDIA CPU core scaling results in a Vulkan vs. OpenGL manner, but simply forgot to post those numbers until now.

Due to being preoccupied with other benchmarks, I forgot to post those NVIDIA OpenGL vs. Vulkan CPU core scaling results, but here are those comparison numbers now.

Read more

Games and Software: Next Up Hero, GStreamer, Corebird, and Pitivi

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Software
Gaming
  • Next Up Hero announced by Aspyr Media and Digital Continue, will support Linux

    Next Up Hero [Steam, Official Site] is a new arcade action-adventure being developed by Digital Continue and it's being published by Aspyr Media.

  • GStreamer Could Be The First Multimedia Framework Supporting RTSP 2.0

    Patches are pending for GStreamer that provide the first public client and server implementation of the RTSP 2.0 protocol, Real Time Streaming Protocol 2.0.

    Real Time Streaming Protocol 2.0 was firmed up last year as the replacement to RTSP 1.0 that does break backwards compatibility. To date the protocol authors know of no other implementation of the RTSP 2.0 so this makes GStreamer the first with a working client and server, albeit not yet merged to Git.

  • Linux Twitter App Corebird v1.5.1 Released

    Avid user of Linux Twitter client Corebird? Well, you may want to know that a new release is available to download. But before you get too excited about finding new features I should point at the latest release comes with stability improvements and nothing else.

  • Pitivi: Keyframes for transformation properties

    With a bit more than a month into the GSOC coding time, my project is almost complete. As a reminder, I was working on implementing a keyframe curve for the transformation properties (which control the positioning and size of a clip) in Pitivi.

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More in Tux Machines

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.

Servers: Microservice, Clear Linux/Containers, Spaceborne Computer

  • Microservice architecture takes a whole new approach to infrastructure
    With services like Netflix, Uber, YouTube, and Facebook, most people are used to apps that respond quickly, work efficiently, and are updated regularly. Patience is no longer a virtue, and thanks to apps like the ones mentioned above, when people use applications, they expect blistering speeds and uninterrupted service. If you do not provide that, users aren’t exactly starved for choice; it takes less than a minute to delete an app and download something else as a replacement.
  • Clear Linux Project Announces the Next Generation of Intel's Clear Containers
    Intel's Clear Linux and Clear Containers teams are happy to introduce the next-generation of Intel's Clear Containers project, version 3.0, which bring many important new features and performance improvements. Rewritten in the Go language, Intel Clear Containers 3.0 introduces support for leveraging code used for namespace-based containers and better integrates into the container ecosystem, allowing support for Docker container engine and Kubernetes. It also improves the compatibility with the POSIX family of standards. "Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment," said Amy L Leeland, Technical Program Manager, Intel Corporation.
  • “Spaceborne” Linux Supercomputer Starts Running In Space, Achieves 1 Teraflop Speed
    About one month ago, the HPE’s Spaceborne Computer was launched into the space using SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft. This beast was launched as a result of a partnership between Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA to find out how high-performance computers perform in space. Now, this supercomputer is fully installed and operational in ISS. The performance experiment will be carried out for one year, which is roughly the time it will take for a spacecraft to travel to Mars. At the moment, lots of calculations for space research projects are carried out on Earth, but this brings in an unavoidable factor of latency.

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more