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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Don't Be Patchman Is the First Game to Launch on Steam Only for Linux

    Don't Be Patchman is a new game that will land on Steam for Linux in about a month. Beside the fact that it seems to be a very interesting title, it's also probably the first one to launch on Linux, without a Windows or Mac version.

  • Terraria Is Finally Coming on Linux

    Terraria, a 2D adventure game developed and published by Re-Logic on Steam, will finally get a Linux version. The makers of the game said on Twitter that a Linux version is incoming.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • KOTOR II gets patched after 10 years to support Mac, Linux
  • Open beta for Linux and Mac version of 'Terraria' coming soon

    After a long wait Mac and Linux users will finally be able to play the popular open-world building RPG, Terraria. According to several tweets from Re-Logic's official Terraria Twitter account, an open public beta for the Linux and Mac version of the game will launch "sometime tomorrow." More details will be released prior to the beta launch, according to Re-Logic's tweets.

  • Steam for Linux Now Has More than 1,300 Games

    It is clear that Steam for Linux is here to stay, and proof of that is that the Steam library of the open source platform has just passed 1,300 titles.

  • Everything tech dealers need to know about Steam Machine

    So after what seems like years (well, at least three years) of rumour, speculation, sneak peaks, demos, SDKs and missed deadlines, punters can now pre-order Valve’s Steam Machine video PC-based games hardware, ahead of a full launch in November this year.

    Details, as ever, are still a little flakey, particularly with regards to the European launch - but it’s an interesting product that could make a significant and disruptive impact on the established PC and console games hardware and software markets in 2016.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • End Of An Era, LinuxGames Website Looks To Be Shutting Down

    A sad day in Linux gaming history could soon be upon us, as the owner of LinuxGames.com currently plans to shut it down. Although one of their contributors wants to continue it, and Icculus has offered to buy the domain.

  • The Flock Will Only Be Playable For A Limited Time, Releasing For Linux This Year

    The Flock is one of the most interesting games I’ve ever heard of, and that’s not just because it looks good, but you only get to play for a limited time.

  • Team Fortress 2 Update Arrives on Steam for Linux

    Team Fortress 2, the online multiplayer game developed by Valve with Linux support and that's constantly in the top ten titles played everyday on Steam, has been updated once more.

  • Caves Of Qud Science Fantasy Roguelike Now In Early Access For Linux, Some Thoughts

    Caves of Qud from the developer of Sproggiwood has just released into Steam’s Early Access, and I decided to give it a spin. I’m not a massive traditional roguelike fan, so has it convinced me?

  • SteamOS 2.0 Beta review - Commencing countdown

    Overall, SteamOS 2.0 Beta is not a revolutionary release, and that's a good thing. Stability and predictability are highly critical to product success. Especially when you have a really decent baseline. In this case, almost to the point of being boring, SteamOS delivers a rather painless experience, with polish and gloss across the board.

    Performance improvement, even inside a virtual machine, and Big Picture tweaks are the most notable fixes. On the other hand, using this distribution on a virtualized platform introduces its share or issues, including a somewhat tricky UEFI setup, Guest Addition hacks, and OpenGL incompatibility. Luckily, all of these can be sorted out, giving you an opportunity to test SteamOS, and get your first impression. Remember, don't do this on your live systems. But test, you shall. Anyhow, SteamOS 2.0 Beta brings the Linux gaming reality that much closer. If you consider yourself a techie, then you will want to be part of this journey, so some downloads and testing are definitely in order. Try it for yourself, see what gives. I like it. End of discussion, and this review, too.

  • The Magic Circle Puzzle FPS Gets Linux Support on Steam

    The Magic Circle, an FPS puzzle game developed and published on Steam by the Question studio, has been released on the Linux platform as well.

  • Unreal Engine 4.8.2 Contains over 30 Important Fixes for Windows, OS X, and Linux

    Stephen Ellis, a renowned Unreal Engine developer at Epic Games, has had the great pleasure of informing us about the immediate availability for download of the second hotfix release for the stable Unreal Engine 4.8 game engine for Windows, Mac OS X, and GNU/Linux operating systems.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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