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Gaming

Reven meets Kickstarter Goal, headed for Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Reven recently announced the team has reached its Kickstarter funding goal, bringing some more awesome 2D platformer goodness to the Linux platform. Varia games also plans on bringing the title to OS X, as well as the Wii U. Monthly updates are planned to be broadcast on the popular gaming video platform, Twitch.tv. A public demo and eta keys should show up in the next few months.

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The Humble Indie Bundle 11

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Linux
Gaming

Welcome again, it's time for a brand new Humble Indie Bundle.... The Humble Indie Bundle 11 is here!

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Stencyl 3.0 Released, A Game Creation Kit With No Programming

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Software
Gaming

Stencyl is an interesting toolkit that enables you to create games without traditional programming, and they have just released the big 3.0.

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QBEH-1: The Atlas Cube Atmospheric First Person Puzzle Game Releasing In April For Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Digital Tribes got in touch with us recently to get the word out about QBEH-1: The Atlas Cube the prequel to QBEH a game which sadly has no Linux version, but this one will.

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Several Great Linux Terminal Games

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Linux
Gaming

Standing for TINT Is Not Tetris, that’s exactly what it is. A terminal-based tetris clone with highscore saving and 9 levels. Among the tetris clones for Linux, TINT is one of my favorites. Use J to move pieces left, L to move them right, K to rotate and SPACE to accelerate. Press Q to quit. On Ubuntu at least, there seems to be a problem when saving highscores due to permissions not allowing it (Error creating /var/games/tint.scores). You can fix it by doing something like this: sudo touch /var/games/tint.scores && sudo chown $USER:$USER /var/games/tint.scores.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

The Reason Some Games Are Delayed For Linux In Humble Indie Bundles

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

There is an "ask me anything" going on in reddit-land right now with the folks from the current Humble Bundle, I decided to ask the question a lot of people have been wondering.

[...]

I think it harms their reputation with Linux fans to have a game completely missing for the sake of what sounds like their egos.

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GNOME Sanity, FAQ, and Gaming Options

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GNOME
Gaming

Today's newsfeeds were bountiful indeed. Muktware is running a comparison of gaming option for us Linux users. The Register tested GNOME 3.12 and says it's looking sensible and sane. And Gary Newell has tried to answer the eternal question: "Is Linux right for me?" Today's post also includes several extras to keep you busy through the weekend too.

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A comparison of gaming options for Linux users

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Linux
Gaming

Linux gaming used to be a wasteland. The only options were simple open source games and the handful of commercial ports that could still be obtained. By comparison, the present day seems like a jungle some times, with more and more options emerging, and it can feel like a full time job keeping up on developments.

Today, we’ll take a brief look at the various options available to you, and what benefits and drawbacks you can run into. This isn’t meant to be completely exhaustive, but rather a good introduction, if you are new to Linux or to the concept of Linux gaming in general. As such, we’ll be covering four primary sources.

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Leftovers: Games News

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more