Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 and 'Squad' Might be Coming to GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 Improves Compatibility For Origin, GOG Galaxy & More

    Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 was released on Sunday as the newest version of this experimental/testing Wine build. This time around there are some exciting new patches.

    On top of re-basing off Friday's Wine 2.0-rc5 release and continuing to maintain quite a number of patches that haven't yet made their way into mainline Wine, a few more patches were added. Upstream Wine is currently under a code freeze until the 2.0 release later this month but that doesn't stop the Wine-Staging crew.

  • Release 2.0-rc5

    Wine Staging 2.0-rc5 improves the compatibility of various applications that require at least Windows Vista or Windows 7. This includes Origin, Uplay, GOG Galaxy and many more. Several bugs were fixed in the PE loader to support loading of packed executables with truncated headers and/or on-the-fly section decompression. If you are using the 64 bit version of Wine, you may also benefit from the memory manager improvements, which allow applications to reserve/allocate more than 32 GB of virtual memory. The memory allocations are now only constrained by resource limitations of the hardware / the operating system and no longer by an artificial design limit in Wine.

  • Looks like FPS game 'Squad' might be coming to Linux soon

    The game uses Unreal Engine and we know already how iffy their Linux support actually is. Hopefully they won't come across too many troubles.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Linux market-share on Steam dropped 0.08% in December 2016

    Why is this important to know? Well, it's highly likely the amount of Linux users on Steam is growing, but it's probably dwarfed by Windows (and likely Mac too) growth at the same time so it brings down our market-share.

    Nothing to worry about, so if anyone writes about it like it's Linux gaming doomsday, don't believe them. It would be something to worry about if developers started coming along noticing a drop in sales from Linux, but not a single developer has said so.

    Keep buying Linux games, keep playing them on Linux and keep going. 2017 is going to be fun!

  • Streets of Rogue development build updated with NAT punch-through and automatic port forwarding
  • Setting up a retro gaming console at home

    Commodore 64 was the first computer I ever saw in 1989. Twice in a year I used to visit my grandparents’ house in Kolkata, I used to get one or two hours to play with it. I remember, after a few years how I tried to read a book on Basic, with the help of an English-to-Bengali dictionary. In 1993, my mother went for a year-long course for her job. I somehow managed to convince my father to buy me an Indian clone of NES (Little Master) in the same year. That was also a life event for me. I had only one game cartridge, only after 1996 the Chinese NES clones entered our village market.

  • Tasbot does Tasblock - Awesome Games Done Quick 2017 - Part 170 [Ed: NES mini uses Linux]

    This speedrun was recorded live at Awesome Games Done Quick 2017, a weeklong charity speedrun marathon raising money for Prevent Cancer Foundation. Awesome Games Done Quick 2017 is just one of the many charity marathons put on by Games Done Quick.

  • Wine 2.0-rc5 release, moving towards a final stable version

Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • SteamVR support for Linux looks like it's getting close

    Thanks to a Twitter tip we have word that it looks as if SteamVR support for Linux might finally be close.

  • Valve May Be Moving Closer With Their VR Linux Support

    It looks like Valve may be moving closer to debut their Linux VR support, which they demonstrated at the 2016 Dev Days and we've known they've been working on further -- including improvements to AMDGPU/RadeonSI/RADV.

  • Early Access survival game 'Rust' gains Vulkan support in a pre-release

    When they do manage to get it fixed up enough to run on Linux, I will give it a go and note some thoughts on it.

  • Rust Game Now Supports Vulkan Renderer

    Not to be confused with Rustlang, the game called Rust now has a Vulkan renderer enabled.

    For those unfamiliar with this early-access game on Steam, as self-described on its product page, "The only aim in Rust is to survive. To do this you will need to overcome struggles such as hunger, thirst and cold. Build a fire. Build a shelter. Kill animals for meat. Protect yourself from other players, and kill them for meat. Create alliances with other players and form a town. Whatever it takes to survive."

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Free/Libre Games

Filed under
Gaming
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017