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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Dear Valve and Steam Machines OEMs, you have it all wrong

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Most of us reading this site want Steam Machines to do well. Not all of us will be interested in buying the hardware, but we're aware that its success is also tied to the success of Linux as a gaming platform, which is why I'm pretty miffed that the OEMs and Valve have messed it up.

Valve have done well with the controller and with making SteamOS pretty coherent and user-friendly, but messed it up when it came to defining what a Steam Machine actually is, leaving it open to interpretation. I've said this time and time again, but the original Steam Machines line-up was a complete mess. We had everything from $1500 PCs to ludicrously overpriced machines which didn't even have discreet graphics cards.

Even the best offerings fall short. Alienware's cheapest offering comes in at $450 (this should be the ideal price point in my opinion), but offers a mere 4GB RAM. If you want to scale this up to 8GB, you have to pay $750 since it also means upping the CPU to an i5. Does a GTX 960 need an i5 to do its thing? No, not really. You might get a few extra frames or do better in a more CPU-intensive game, but if one tries to step outside the worldview of a PC gamer and into one of a console gamer, then it doesn't take long to realise that those $200 aren't worth it, but $20 for an extra stick of 4GB RAM would be worth it.

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Games: Cold Beam, Unvanquished, Vendetta Online

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Trying The Radeon RX 480 & R9 Fury With The AMDGPU Code For Linux 4.8

    With the main batch of Radeon/AMDGPU driver changes ready for DRM-Next that will in turn land for the Linux 4.8 kernel, I've begun testing this new code with various AMD GPUs. Here are my AMDGPU results when comparing Linux 4.7 Git to this code that's coming for Linux 4.8 with a Radeon R9 Fury and RX 480.

    Yesterday I built a fresh Ubuntu kernel of this new drm-next-4.8 Radeon/AMDGPU material merged back atop its Linux 4.7 drm-fixes code. This was pointed out by Alex in the forums due to not all of the drm-fixes being mainlined yet for the RX 480. If you are interested in trying out this Linux 4.7 drm-fixes + drm-next-4.8 kernel for Radeon/AMDGPU, you can find it on Phoronix.net: linux-image-4.7.0-rc5-4.8-next-plus-fixes_4.7.0-rc5-4.8-next-plus-fixes-1_amd64.deb.

  • Mesa 12 released, Vulkan for Intel, OpenGL 4.3 and more for open source graphics users

    Wow, Mesa 12 has officially been released and it's a huge release for them! Intel now supports Vulkan, their OpenGL is up to 4.3 and more.

  • Starbound to finally leave Early Access on July 22nd

    After a number of years in development Starbound is finally about to get a full release and I can't wait to play it in full!

    We actually ran a server for it a long while ago, so would you guys be interested if we ran a Linux gamer server again? If enough people are interested I will do it for sure as it will be nice to play it with others.

  • Have you seen Black Ice? A really rather cool hack and shoot FPS with Linux & SteamOS support

    Black Ice is a game I have followed for a long time (and personally purchased a copy) and it just released a rather nice update. If you're an FPS fan and looking for something to sink some time into, this could be what you need.

    It's rather different to any other FPS I've played before, as you go around hacking into different buildings with assorted difficulty levels, and from the hack a bunch of enemies spawn.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Haven Moon rises today on Windows, Mac, and Linux

    The trailer and screenshots of Haven Moon show off some of its fantastical landscapes and machinery in crisp detail. What they don't show is that although rendered in real-time 3D, Roussel has designed the game to be played entirely with the mouse. Your journey across Seleos reveals a "calm and lonely place where you hear the sounds of the sea, the wind and the beautiful music." You'll also encounter a variety of puzzles that are fully integrated with the story and promise to be "not too hard nor too easy, just like the length of the adventure is made to be not too long nor too short. Everything is balanced to provide a light relaxing and peaceful experience, to spend a pleasant time in an imaginary world."

  • LucasArts’ Habitat Compiled and Preserved on Github in Historic Achievement

    It’s important for us, as gamers, to know our favorite medium’s past. Doing so informs us of what past developers did well, what they didn’t do well, what kinds of gaming experiences and knowledge manifest today in altered or re-interpreted forms, and which directions games might be heading both technically and conceptually. It’s especially important to learn about gaming’s past in our current era, where information is ephemeral and is especially prone to being misinterpreted due to rapid communications technologies. Institutions like the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (and the planned Videogame History Museum in Frisco, Texas) and websites like The Cutting Room Floor help us achieve that task in various ways. Source code repositories like Github, meanwhile, archive the essential components of specific games in more literal forms.

  • A classic MMO goes open source, The Other 99 comes to Linux, and more gaming news

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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today's leftovers

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Security News

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    The summit was used to expose a number of flaws in Linux's design that make it increasingly unsuitable to power modern devices. Linux is the operating system that runs most of the modern world. It is behind everything from web servers and supercomputers to mobile phones. Increasingly, it's also being used to run connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices, including products like cars and intelligent robots.
  • security things in Linux v4.6
    Hector Marco-Gisbert removed a long-standing limitation to mmap ASLR on 32-bit x86, where setting an unlimited stack (e.g. “ulimit -s unlimited“) would turn off mmap ASLR (which provided a way to bypass ASLR when executing setuid processes). Given that ASLR entropy can now be controlled directly (see the v4.5 post), and that the cases where this created an actual problem are very rare, means that if a system sees collisions between unlimited stack and mmap ASLR, they can just adjust the 32-bit ASLR entropy instead.

Raspberry Pi PIXEL and More Improvements