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Gaming

Steam and KDE on FreeBSD

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KDE
BSD
Gaming
  • Script Makes It Easy To Deploy Steam On FreeBSD

    With a new script, it's possible to get Valve's Steam Linux game client running relatively well on FreeBSD.

    On FreeBSD in conjunction with its Linux binary compatibility layer it's possible to run Steam for handling your favorite Steam Linux titles. If you are unfamiliar with FreeBSD's Linux compatibility layer, see FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?. That article has background information along with some Linux vs. FreeBSD gaming benchmarks I did five years ago... When FreeBSD 11.0 is out, I'll try again to get it working to see how FreeBSD 11 performs for running Linux native games.

  • Time flies for FBSD updates, too

    The older KDE stuff — that is, KDE4, which is still the current official release for the desktop on FreeBSD — is also maintained, although (obviously) not much changes there. We did run into a neat C++-exceptions bug recently, which was kind of hard to trigger: running k3b (or ksoundconverter and some other similar ones) with a CD that is unknown to MusicBrainz would crash k3b. There’s not that many commercially-available CDs unknown to that database, so I initially brushed off the bug report as Works For Me.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • Audacious 3.8 Beta 1 Released, Available In PPA

    Audacious 3.8 beta 1 was released a couple of days ago and is available in the WebUpd8 Unstable PPA. The new version brings support for running multiple Audacious instances, a new plugin for the Qt interface, and various other improvements and bug fixes.

  • Total System Backup and Recall with Déjà Dup

    You will be hard pressed to find an easier, more reliable backup GUI for Linux than Déjà Dup. Although it might not have all the flexibility of some of its command-line counterparts, it is a solution that anyone can depend upon. Install it and schedule a regular backup of your important data...and hope that you never have to use (but rest assured it’s there).

  • RcppStreams 0.1.1

    A maintenance release of RcppStreams is now on CRAN. RcppStreams brings the excellent Streamulus C++ template library for event stream processing to R.

    Streamulus, written by Irit Katriel, uses very clever template meta-programming (via Boost Fusion) to implement an embedded domain-specific event language created specifically for event stream processing.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.16 is now available.

  • New Commercial Wine Interface CrossOver Brings Impoved Support For Windows Apps
  • GCC 6.2 Is Coming Quite Soon

    Version 6.2 of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is expected to come quite soon.

    This is important as GCC 6.2 is the first point release to the stable GCC6 compiler under the versioning scheme they rolled out last year: GCC 6.0 was development, GCC 6.1 was the first stable release, and GCC 6.2 is now the first point release. That's important since a number of distribution vendors tend to wait until around this first point release before incorporating a major new version of the GCC compiler.

  • The GNU C Library version 2.24 is now available
  • This Is the Police released for Linux, some thoughts on this intriguing strategy and adventure game

    The only thing I don't like is the checkpoint save system. You don't get to save the game whenever you like. It appears each day is a new save. I always get frustrated by checkpoint-only saves, so that's the only mark against the game in my personal opinion.

  • Classic Disney games, Transport Fever, and more Linux gaming news
  • Total War: Warhammer Heading To Mac & Linux

    Announced through a press release that was sent over earlier today, Total War: Warhammer will be heading towards both Mac and Linux later this year. The video game is developed by Creative Assembly in partnership with Games Workshop where gamers can expect a turn-based campaign filled with real-time battles.

Disney on GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Unigine 2.3 Improves Screen-Space Raytraced Reflections

    The visually stunning and longtime Linux-friendly Unigine Engine is up to version 2.3 with a number of new features.

    Unigine 2.3 rolls out HTC Vive VR support, round earth support, a completely redesigned landscape tool, the meatlness workflow enabled by default, improved screen-space raytraced reflections, improved GGX mipmaps, parallax depth cutout, configurable TAA, water improvements, and more.

  • Near Death patch released, has an amusing bit for Linux gamers

    Personally I think it's a very cool game and I am looking forward to spending more time with it soon! If I don't find that damn penguin I'm going to cry a little inside.

  • The Fall Part 2: Unbound To Land Early 2017 & Part 1 Updated For Linux

    Before digging into the juicy news, I'd like to take a moment to note that last week we were finally able to get The Fall's Linux builds updated, bringing Linux users into sync with Windows and Mac users, and making new features like developer commentary available across all platforms.

Software and Games

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Software
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances. The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered. Read more

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