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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Can Commercial Linux Gaming Succeed?

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Linux games have always been one of the goals of free software. If game developers could only be persuaded to develop for Linux, the daydream goes, the operating system would start to gain serious market share. The last few years have lent hope to the dream, but the progress remains slow -- so slow, in fact, that its realization is starting to look questionable.

The first large scale effort to sell Linux games commercially was Loki Software, which ported games like Civilization and Railway Tycoon around the turn of the millennium. It quickly failed financially, leaving Linux gaming largely to minor free-license games like Pysol and Tux Racer, and to efforts to run Windows games using WINE.

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Minetest is an open source Minecraft inspired game

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OSS
Gaming

Microsoft is spending $2.5 billion to acquire Mojang, the company behind the game Minecraft. Minecraft is one of the major games played on the Microsoft gaming platform Xbox. No wonder Microsoft is interested. Minecraft is a game about breaking and placing blocks. It began with creating barricades to ward off nocturnal monsters but people started developing various imaginative things as the game evolved. Minecraft can be a game of adventures or to relax. You can buy the game for $26.95.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Valve Begins Publicly Tracking AMD Catalyst Linux Issues

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Gaming

Valve's Pierre-Loup A. Griffais has begun publicly listing known issues with AMD's Catalyst Linux graphics support.

Via this Steam Community discussion page, known issues with the AMD Linux graphics support as it pertains to SteamOS are listed. The page is to be updated as Valve discovers more issues.

The issues listed right now include black/flickering screen when full-screen mode is enabled for certain games, lower performance compared to desktop distributions, and crackling sound over HDMI. Of course, already in the comments are many Linux gamers chiming in with their AMD Linux graphics troubles.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

AMD RadeonSI Gallium3D Performance For 4K Linux Gaming

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

While we routinely carry out Ultra HD (4K) Linux graphics/gaming benchmarks at Phoronix, it's generally been conducted with the proprietary NVIDIA and AMD graphics drivers since the open-source drivers traditionally have had a challenge on performance even at 1080p. However, thanks to the maturing open-source Radeon driver stack, it's possible with higher-end AMD graphics processors with the latest open-source Linux driver code to begin running at the 4K UHD resolution of 3840 x 2160.

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Retrogaming With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

You might be surprised to learn that outside of work, bringing up three children and a dog and writing about Linux that I try to find time for other hobbies such as being a navigator at classic car rallies and playing old computer games.

This article looks at the options available for potential retrogamers using a fairly standard Linux Mint or Ubuntu setup.

There are already specialist Linux distributions available for playing computer games such as Puppy Arcade. If you just want to play games casually then running a whole distribution to do so might seem a bit overkill.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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KDE With Theoretical Client-Side Decorations, Windows 10 Influence

KDE contributor and graphics designer Ken Vermette has penned an interesting series of KDE "What if..." articles where he talks about (and has some visual mock-ups) about what KDE might look like with client-side decorations along and separately if KDE were to use Windows 10 design components. Read more Also: What if… Plasma Used Launchers from Other Systems & Enviornments? (Part 1) What if… KDE Used Windows 10 Design Components?

Pondering FOSS foundations

In the case of the Document Foundation, the LibreOffice project needed an independent, solid and meritocratic entity dedicated to support it. In other terms, the OpenOffice.org community wanted to be its own boss and stop relying on corporate – or even third party – good will. If you attend the Community Track on the 31st you will be able to learn more about the Document Foundation and the other entities, but my message here is that while there is no silver bullet in these matters, forcing a community be hosted or to bend to a software vendor never works. It bends if it wants to; it goes whereever it wishes to go. In the case of the Document Foundation, independence and community rule prevailed over convenience; today the results do not need to be proven anymore. But it does not mean we hold the truth more than anybody else: we just ensured the community was in charge. Read more

10+ Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn

There is some discussion of whether or not you should upgraded to 14.10 here, but the short version is, for most people an upgrade from 14.04 is not necessary but not a bad idea, and an upgrade from any earlier version is a very good idea. Mostly, though, you should just upgrade. One could ask the question, should you be installing Ubuntu with Unity. You have to like Unity. I personally like to have a wider range of desktop options than Ubuntu with Unity allows, but for a notebook or laptop where you are going to be using one application at a time, usually use GUI apps, and like to have your computer integrated fairly seamlessly to social networking services, etc., it is a good option. Read more