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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Smartphone game: Ground Effect, Tizen Racing Game FREE for Limited Time

    Ground Effect is a mobile game where you have to ride and drive your hovering aircraft on the sea. There are currently three races: Race, Ghost Race and Just Cruise. The race is the normal race where you have to you have floating cones on the water and you need to go through them to make a checkpoint there, YOU ALSO HAVE NO CHOICE!! You have to go through to make the next pair of cones light up indicating that those are the ones you need to go through. There are different racing ships, a yellow, purple and white; a white and red one; a green goo one on a white background; a flame one on a black background; a red and yellow one; a blue, white and red one; a yellow and black one; an orange and green one; a blue, black and a tiny bit of white; and a black and red one.

  • Wine Staging 2.2 Comes Hot on the Heels of Wine 2.2 with CSMT Optimizations

    Wine Staging 2.2 has been released today, February 22, 2017, and it's coming hot on the heels of last week's Wine 2.2 development release to bring various under-the-hood improvements to its CSMT (Command-Stream Multi-Threading) feature.

    Being based on Wine 2.2, Wine Staging 2.2 inherits all of its new functionality, including the ability to set the default Windows version to Windows 7 for newly created prefixes, the implementation of additional Shader Model 5 instructions, initial support for double-buffered theme painting, as well as the new Direct3D command stream improvements.

  • The Linux-supported MMO 'Albion Online' finally has a release date, new huge update in March

    The rather good MMO 'Albion Online' finally has a proper release date! I am looking forward to creating a guild with some Linux gamers.

  • SuperTuxKart Is Now on Steam Greenlight — Go Vote!

    Yup, the iconic open-source karting game is hoping to rev up enough interest to snatch a space amid the shelves of the Steam games store.

    “After a lot of requests and months of hard work we are launching SuperTuxKart on Steam Greenlight,” the team explain in a blog post (in which they also cite some of your comments from this site).

War Thunder on GNU/Linux and More on SteamVR

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Gaming

Radeon vs. NVIDIA Performance For HITMAN On Linux With 17 GPUs

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Gaming

Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated Linux port of HITMAN, which debuted for Windows last year. Now that there's benchmark support for HITMAN on Linux, I have been running a number of tests for this game that's powered by the Glacier Engine and making use of OpenGL for rendering on Linux. In this article are our initial AMD Radeon performance figures making use of the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver compared to NVIDIA's driver and the assortment of GeForce results published yesterday.

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Virtual Reality on GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Destinations & Dota VR Hub are now available on Linux

    Valve have already put up Linux versions of both Destinations and The Dota VR Hub now that SteamVR is supported on Linux in beta.

  • Valve debuts developer build of SteamVR for Linux

    Heads up, Linux fans who are maybe also VR developers (or vice versa): The folks at Valve Software have today released a very much still-in-development version of SteamVR that runs on Linux.

  • Valve launches SteamVR support for Linux

    Valve has been giving Steam users Linux love since 2012, and it's not stopping with VR. The company just launched SteamVR for Linux, letting developers create Linux content for the HTC Vive VR headset, trackers and other hardware. The program is in beta, meaning developers must use an NVIDIA developer beta driver that's built on "Vulkan," the successor to OpenGL. You're limited to "direct" mode, meaning you can only display images on the headset and not a desktop display at the same time.

  • Valve Finally Brings SteamVR To Linux As A Developer Release

    It was over four months ago now that Valve showed SteamVR running in Linux for the first time. Today, it’s finally launching the platform on the operating system, albeit in a limited form.

    SteamVR comes to Linux as a development release, meaning it’s intended for content creators to start working on apps for the open-source OS, and not for regular Linux users to access. To that end, users must have opted into the public Beta for Steam or SteamVR to access it along with obtaining pre-release drivers. On Nvidia cards that means the 375.27.10 “Developer Beta Driver”, while AMD users will need a pre-release version of the radv driver. You’ll also need Unity 5.6 to actually create content through Linux.

SteamVR for Linux, Benchmarks of HITMAN on NVIDIA

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Gaming
  • SteamVR for Linux is now officially in Beta

    Valve have put up SteamVR for Linux officially in Beta form and they are keen to stress that this is a development release.

    You will need to run the latest Steam Beta Client for it to work at all, so be sure to opt-in if you want to play around with it.

  • Valve Publishes A SteamVR Developer Build For Linux

    Valve has begun rolling out their SteamVR Linux support by announcing today a beta/developer build of their VR support for Linux.

    Valve's SteamVR for Linux page was updated today to reflect the build becoming public via the Steam beta channel, "This is a development release. It is intended to allow developers to start creating SteamVR content for Linux platforms. Limited hardware support is provided, and pre-release drivers are required. Linux support is currently only available in the "beta" branch, make sure you are using SteamVR[beta] before reporting issues."

  • HITMAN Linux Benchmarks On 12 NVIDIA GPUs

    Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated port of HITMAN for Linux. While at first it didn't look like this Linux game port would work out for our benchmarking requirements, thanks to Feral it does indeed work for another interesting Linux gaming test perspective. For our initial HITMAN Linux benchmarks are tests from 12 NVIDIA GeForce GPUs while our Radeon tests will come tomorrow.

NVIDIA/Radeon Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Relative Gaming Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Last week I published some Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Radeon benchmarks and Windows vs. Linux NVIDIA Pascal tests. Those results were published by themselves while for this article are the AMD and NVIDIA numbers merged together and normalized to get a look at the relative Windows vs. Linux gaming performance.

With the tests last week we tested Company of Heroes 2, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, GRID Autosport, Metro Last Light Redux, Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor, Civilization VI, Tomb Raider, Total War: WARHAMMER, and The Talos Principle, among others.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Games for GNU/Linux

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  • Making your OpenStack monitoring stack highly available using Open Source tools
    Operators tasked with maintaining production environments are relying on monitoring stacks to provide insight to resource usage and a heads-up to threats of downtime. Perhaps the most critical function of a monitoring stack is providing alerts which trigger mitigation steps to ensure an environment stays up and running. Downtime of services can be business-critical, and often has extremely high cost ramifications. Operators working in cloud environments are especially reliant on monitoring stacks due to the increase in potential inefficiency and downtime that comes with greater resource usage. The constant visibility of resources and alerts that a monitoring stack provides, makes it a fundamental component of any cloud.
  • InfraRed: Deploying and Testing Openstack just made easier!
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    When new contributors join RDO, they ask for recommendations about how to add new services and help RDO users to adopt it. This post is not a official policy document nor a detailed description about how to carry out some activities, but provides some high level recommendations to newcomers based on what I have learned and observed in the last year working in RDO.
  • Getting to know the essential OpenStack components better
  • Getting to know core components, speed mentoring, and more OpenStack news
  • Testing LibreOffice 5.3 Notebookbar
    I teach an online CSCI class about usability. The course is "The Usability of Open Source Software" and provides a background on free software and open source software, and uses that as a basis to teach usability. The rest of the class is a pretty standard CSCI usability class. We explore a few interesting cases in open source software as part of our discussion. And using open source software makes it really easy for the students to pick a program to study for their usability test final project.
  • [Older] Drupal member sent out after BDSM lifestyle revealed

    Drupal, like many other open source projects, has a stated goal of welcoming and accepting all people, no matter their heritage, culture, sexual orientation, gender identity or other factors.

  • Controversy Erupts in Open-Source Community After Developer's Sex Life Made Public
    Drupal is a popular open-source content-management system, used to build websites. Like many other open-source projects, Drupal is guided by several committees that are supposed to be accountable to the community and its code of conduct, which enshrines values like "be considerate" and "be respectful." Also like many other open-source projects, Drupal attracts all sorts of people, some of whom are eclectic. Last week, under murky circumstances, Drupal creator Dries Buytaert banned one of the project's technical and community leaders, Larry Garfield. Buytaert attributed the decision to aspects of Garfield's private sex life. Many Drupal users and developers are up in arms about the perceived injustice of the move, exacerbated by what they see as a lack of transparency.
  • HospitalRun: Open Source Software for the Developing World
    When open source software is used for global health and global relief work, its benefits shine bright. The benefits of open source become very clear when human health and human lives are on the line. In this YouTube video, hear Harrisburg, Pennsylvania software developer Joel Worrall explain about HospitalRun software – open source cloud-based software used at developing world healthcare facilities.
  • Scotland emphasises sharing and reuse of ICT
    Scotland’s public administrations should focus on common, shared technology platforms, according to the new digital strategy, published on 22 March. The government says it wants to develop “shared infrastructure, services and standards in collaboration with our public sector partners, to reduce costs and enable resources to be focused on front-line services.”
  • [Older] OpenSSL Re-licensing to Apache License v. 2.0 To Encourage Broader Use with Other FOSS Projects and Products

    OpenSSL Launches New Website to Organize Process, Seeks to Contact All Contributors

  • Austria state secretary promotes open data
    The State Secretary at Austria’s Federal Chancellery, Muna Duzdar, is encouraging the making available of government data as open data. “The administration must set an example and support the open data culture by giving society its data back”, the State Secretary for Digitalisation said in a statement.
  • Study: Hungary should redouble open data initiatives
    The government of Hungary should redouble its efforts to make public sector information available as open data, and actively help to create market opportunities, a government white paper recommends. The ‘White Paper on National Data Policy’ was approved by the government in December.
  • Williamson School Board OKs developing open source science curriculum
    Science textbooks may be a thing of the past in Williamson County Schools. The Williamson County school board approved a proposal Monday night to use open source science resources instead of science textbooks. The switch will require a team of nine teachers to spend a year developing an open source curriculum.
  • How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access
    It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access.
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