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Gaming

Linux gaming

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Back in 2006, when I was contemplating a move from Windows to Linux, I knew I would have to give up computer games. This wasn’t because there were no games written for Linux, it’s just that they weren’t very good. Most of the best commercial games were (and still are) written for Windows, but that’s been changing dramatically over the last year, thanks to Steam, the Internet-based software distribution platform from Valve Corp.

The move to support Linux came fairly late but is drawing impetus from the top.

In July 2012, Valve managing director Gabe Newell had complained that Windows 8 was “a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space.”

Observing that many people still stayed away from Linux because of a lack of games, he said Valve was working to bring Steam titles to Linux as a hedging strategy.

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today's leftovers

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Software
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

25 great Linux games available dirt cheap during Steam's Summer Sale

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

The Steam Summer Sale is here, and Lord GabeN and his minions are tossing out deep, deep discounts on games left and right. There are flash sales and hidden gems galore, but alas: Only a small proportion Steam's catalog includes Linux support. What's an open-source aficionado to do?

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FlightGear 3.0 Is the Most Advanced Simulator on Linux and It's Completely Free

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Gaming

FlightGear 3.0, an open source flight simulator that supports a variety of popular platforms and is developed by skilled volunteers from around the world, is available for download.

FlightGear aims to create a sophisticated and open flight simulator framework for use in research or academic environments, pilot training, or as an industry engineering tool. This is probably the only simulation of its kind on the Linux platform, especially in terms of complexity...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Super Pi Brothers

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Gaming

I don't game as much as I used to. Although I've certainly spent countless hours of my life in front of a Nintendo, SNES, or after that, playing a first-person shooter on my computer (Linux only, thank you), these days, my free time tends to go toward one of the many nongaming hobbies I've accumulated. Recently though, I found myself dusting off my Wii console just so I could play an NES and SNES game I re-purchased for it. The thing is, those games require using a somewhat strange controller, and I already have a modified SNES controller that can connect over USB. That was enough to encourage me to search for a better solution. Of course, I simply could connect three or four consoles and stack up games in my living room, but I've grown accustomed to ripping my CDs and DVDs and picking what I want to listen to or watch from a central media center. It would be nice if I didn't have to get up and find a cartridge every time I wanted to switch games. This, of course, means going with emulation, but although in the past I'd had success with a modified classic Xbox, I didn't have that hardware anymore. I figured someone must have gotten this set up on the Raspberry Pi, and sure enough, after a brief search and a few commands, I had a perfect retro-gaming arcade set up on a spare Raspberry Pi.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more