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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Ioquake3 Is Finally Moving To Its New OpenGL Renderer By Default

    The ioquake3 open-source game engine project that's built around the Quake III: Arena code-base is finally moving to its new renderer by default and abandoning the original 17-year-old renderer.

    Beginning next month they will be defaulting new ioquake3 installs to using their "OpenGL 2" renderer and in November will disable the original renderer for all ioquake3 installations.

  • Agricola spinoff and Patchwork pass Greenlight, heading to Linux

    Two more digital incarnations of designer Uwe Rosenberg's hit 2-player board games are coming to Linux on Steam, as they've both now passed their Greenlight campaigns!

    Yes, they are mobile ports, just as Le Havre: The Inland Port is, but that doesn't mean they're of poor quality. In fact, it's just the opposite. I've played all three on Android (and the Le Havre spinoff additionally on Linux), and they're all fantastic and well-polished implementations. DIGIDICED is a team of only 4 developers, but they're really doing a great job with the licenses. They've even shown evidence of acting on user feedback with Le Havre, so I feel confident in recommending them to my fellow Linux gamers.

  • Wargame: European Escalation works once again for Nvidia users, two years after breaking

    It seems Wargame: European Escalation was broken for nearly two years (see this forum post) for Nvidia GPU users on Linux.

  • Curvatron, a simple yet interesting evolution of the old game 'Snake', we have free keys for you

    Curvatron has recently been released on Linux and the developer sent in a bunch of keys for you lucky people. The game itself is inspired by the old game 'Snake' that was on rather old Nokia mobile phones.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • We Happy Few to release on Linux after the full release, not during Early Access

    I spoke to the developer of We Happy Few on twitter to get an update on the Linux version, it seems it has been pushed back.

  • Booting the Final GameCube Game

    Every single GameCube game can at least boot in Dolphin 5.0. Except one. Star Wars: The Clone Wars and its complex way of using the PowerPC Memory Management Unit rendered it unplayable in Dolphin up to this day. But finally as of Dolphin 5.0-540, this challenge has come and gone: Dolphin can finally boot every single GameCube game in the official library.

  • Our Fourth Podcast with Cheese, Porter on DOTT Remastered

    A couple of weeks ago I had the chance to get some time with Cheese (based in Australia), who worked on the recent port of Day of the Tentactle Remastered by Double Fine. We actually ended talking for a very long time (Cheese is very talkative, but that’s great because most of what he talks about is really interesting and insightful) so his podcast is just a short, edited version of the bits we found the most relevant to share with you.

    Since Day of the Tentacle Remastered was the first port of Cheese (while he was already involved in Linux game development for a long time), it was a great opportunity to learn more about how you should approach porting and games packaging for Linux. He had already provided some great amount of details in his blog post, and I wanted to go a little further with this podcast on some particular points.

  • Rocket League Beta Impressions

    Rocket League is the sequel to Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars (AKA SARP Battle-Cars) for the PlayStation 3. Seeing as the first game wasn’t a very good success, Psyonix, the developer and publisher behind both games, looked to address some of the issues that were presented, while still maintaining much of the core of Battle-Cars: you’re in control of a remote-controlled car in a soccer/football field, and the goal is simple: knock a ball into the goal, while preventing the opposing team from doing the same thing. It’s basically soccer (or, what most countries would call football) with RC cars. These cars can be customized to your liking, whether you like a monster truck with flaming red flames or a limousine with simple design and elegance. Much of the DLC actually has additional fancy-looking cars from which you can purchase (I’m probably going to wait until there’s a Game of the Year edition, as none of the DLC actually expands the gameplay itself). Your car has a boost gauge that will fill up as you collect orange patches on the ground and drain as you use it. These boosts give the game a little bit more complexity as cars can rush to their side to prevent a goal, add a little more knockout force when hitting the ball, or lifting yourself up into the air for an air hit. Or, if you’re like me, if your car goes fast enough you can run other cars over, forcing them to respawn to a random location. In addition, the cars can do frontflips, backflips, and sideflips to ensure a more accurate shot. Now Rocket League is currently among the top ten highest-player-count games on Steam. I’m honestly not much into the game myself but I certainly understand why it’s so popular. In fact, it’s considered to be an eSport, with tournaments every weekend.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Rocket League for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Rocket League Officially Released for SteamOS and Linux with a 25% Off Promotion

    On September 8, 2016, game studio Psyonix was proud to announce the availability of a Beta version of the popular Rocket League game for SteamOS/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems.

    Rocket League is a futuristic, physics-based sports/action game that lets players play European football while driving booster-rigged vehicles. It is the successor of the popular and classic Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars game released in 2008 only for Sony's PlayStation 3 gaming console, also developed and published by the Psyonix game studio.

    The game officially hit the Microsoft Windows and PlayStation 4 platforms in July 2015, and a few months later, in February 2016, it arrived for Microsoft's Xbox One gaming console as well. Due to popular demand, Rocket League is now also officially available for the Linux and Apple's Mac OS X operating systems, but only in a Beta form at the moment of writing this article.

  • Rocket League Finally Released For Linux
  • Rocket League released for SteamOS, it's in beta

    Rocket League is now officially available for SteamOS, due to the time of the release I will be unable to give any actual impressions as I am likely asleep while this gets published.

    I will be able to get impressions up rather early tomorrow morning (UTC time), as it will be my first priority. It will likely be the main game on our Friday livestream too.

    It's been a bit of a wild ride, but it's here ‒ finally.

  • Mesa & AMDGPU-PRO Appear To Run Fine With Rocket League On Linux

    With many Linux gamers having looked forward to the Linux release of Rocket League, I tested out the Linux port of the game when using Mesa RadeonSI Gallium3D as well as the AMDGPU-PRO blob.

    Considering Rocket League on Linux lists system requirements even lower than the Windows specifications and do mention AMD, I was expecting the process to go well. Additionally, Rocket League is powered by Unreal Engine 3 -- yes, UE3, not UE4. Considering that, it went well.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Rocket League Launches on Linux This Week

    Oh boy, have you been patiently waiting for it — and now it’s finally coming. Yes, Rocket League for Linux will launch in beta on September 8. Developer’s Psyonix say they will only support SteamOS “officially”, though the game should be able to run on any modern Linux distro that Steam does, including Ubuntu.

  • Rocket League coming to OS X and Linux this week

    Rocket League, the race car-football (soccer) game fusion, will receive a new update on Thursday, September 8th. One of the biggest components of the update is the included OS X and SteamOS (including Linux distributions) support. The update also comes with a new Rumble mode, updates to classic Rocket Trails, and other changes.

  • Unigine-Powered Sci-Fi MMORPG Turn

    Earlier this year we heard of a science fiction MMORPG game making use of Unigine 2 after switching from Unreal Engine 4.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more