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Gaming

With Valve On Linux, Has LGP Lost All Relevance?

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Most Linux gamers don't want to spend $30+ USD for some game that's several years old where they may already own the Linux copy, they could buy the Windows copy for just a few dollars, and where it runs fine under Wine/CrossOver software. With Valve on Linux, we'll be getting fresh games and if you have the game already on Mac OS X or Windows, it should be available from the Steam Linux client (assuming it's been ported to Linux).

The old titles from LGP also aren't anything that were even really compelling when originally released, with most Windows gamers likely never even having heard of them, like Gorky 17, Hyperspace Delivery Boy, and Gorky 17. The few worthwhile games out of Linux Game Publishing were Shadowgrounds, X2/X3, Postal II, and Cold War.

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Steam's In-Home Steaming Is a Wake-up Call for Windows, Linux Is Growing Stronger

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

Now that Valve has made the In-Home Steaming feature available to everyone who is using Steam, you might ask yourself if it's of any use for the majority of the Linux players, but that's not the most important question. This seemingly unimportant feature has much broader implications and it might be the game changer in the competition between Windows and Linux.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

SteamOS Receives Security Updates from Debian

Filed under
Debian
Gaming

Valve has two builds for SteamOS. One is a stable version (sort of) and the other one is a Beta (Alchemist). Up until a week ago the two versions have been almost identical, which meant that maintaining two different branches was really nonsensical. This has started to change and Valve has released a second Beta in just a few days, making some important updates.

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Linux Users Can Now Play Windows Games on Steam with In-Home Streaming

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

The In-Home Streaming feature allows users to stream games from a Windows operating system to a Linux-powered machine that also runs Steam. This is the solution proposed by Valve that practically enables Linux gamers to play any Windows-only titles, although it's rather cumbersome, to say the least.

Like any other major Steam update, the latest has been preceded by a flurry of smaller ones in the Beta branch of the software. This is basically just a collection of those features and fixes that were already available for all users of Steam Beta.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Epic Games Wants Linux to Take Off as a Gaming Platform

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Gaming

Epic Games is a company that is all too familiar with Linux and its community. The studio released Unreal Tournament 2004 for Linux at a time when no one was really giving a damn about open source as an entertainment platform. Also, the devs have always had some sort of Linux dedicated servers in place for their titles.

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Unreal Engine 4.2 feature preview shows inclusion of Vehicles & Camera Animations

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Gaming

Following hot on the foot of the last update to the Unreal Engine, the update version 4.1, Epic is now gearing up for the next version of the Unreal Engine, version 4.2. A new blog post has been put up on the official Unreal Engine website previewing the various features of the latest update to the engine. The major update to this version is perhaps the inclusion of Vehicles, Camera Animations & tighter integration to Blueprints, along with other little features and tweaks & bug fixes common to new versions.

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