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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Unigine 2.4 Will Bring Yet More Graphical Improvements To This Linux-Friendly Engine

    Unigine Corp is preparing their next major Unigine 2 engine update, Unigine 2.4. This should be another exciting update while unfortunately their new technology demo isn't making it out in time for Christmas.

    Their new Unigine "superstition" / "classroom" technology demo built off Unigine 2 is a huge advancement over Unigine Heaven/Valley. Unigine Superstition is built off Unigine 2, features VR support, and offers a ton of rich graphical improvements while still being Linux-friendly. While it was supposed to arrive this year, Unigine Corp recently delayed it until Q1'17. But let me tell you, the delay should certainly be worthwhile and this new demo is absolutely gorgeous.

  • Mesa's RADV Vulkan Driver Receives Some Fixes For DOOM

    Red Hat developer Dave Airlie spent some of his Christmas committing some fixes to the open-source RADV Radeon Vulkan driver for benefiting id Software's DOOM game with Vulkan renderer.

  • The art of cutting edge, Doom 2 vs the modern Security Industry

    During the holiday, I started playing Doom 2. I bet I’ve not touched this game in more than ten years. I can't even remember the last time I played it. My home directory was full of garbage and it was time to clean it up when I came across doom2.wad. I’ve been carrying this file around in my home directory for nearly twenty years now. It’s always there like an old friend you know you can call at any time, day or night. I decided it was time to install one of the doom engines and give it a go. I picked prboom, it’s something I used a long time ago and doesn’t have any fancy features like mouselook or jumping. Part of the appeal is to keep the experience close to the original. Plus if you could jump a lot of these levels would be substantially easier. The game depends on not having those features.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Get your dancing shoes, as Crypt of the NecroDancer: AMPLIFIED DLC is on its way

    Crypt of the NecroDancer: AMPLIFIED [Official Site] is the first gameplay DLC for the roguelike rhythm game and it sounds great.

  • Some thoughts on Age of Conquest IV

    Back when I started using Linux full time around 2007, there were two game genres that were well represented: fast action multiplayer oriented first-person shooters in the Quake mould and Risk derivatives. Mostly made in Java, games like Lux Delux and Aevum Obscurum were notable for their presence on a platform that had yet to be embraced by major game distributors. After Desura launched for Linux in 2011, I finally gave one of these games a try in the form of Age of Conquest III.

  • Some Of The Popular Gaming Platforms For Linux

    Online gaming is becoming something of a standard and there quite a few options available for those in the Linux universe. Some are more popular than others but there is nothing wrong in knowing the alternatives as you can check availability from amongst them or compare pricing. So let's look at some of the popular gaming platforms on Linux.

Games for GNU/Linux

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More Games

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Total War: WARHAMMER Realm of the Wood Elves DLC Out Now on Linux and SteamOS

    Today, December 20, 2016, Feral Interactive, the UK-based video game publisher known for porting numerous AAA titles to Linux and SteamOS platforms, proudly announced the availability of the Total War: WARHAMMER Realm of the Wood Elves DLC on Linux.

    The company teased Linux/SteamOS gamers with the release of Total War: WARHAMMER Realm of the Wood Elves DLC on Steam for Linux and Valve's Debian-based SteamOS gaming platform a couple of weeks ago, when they told us that it might land just before the Christmas holidays. And today is that day!

  • Enter the Realm of the Wood Elves — new DLC released for Total War: WARHAMMER on Linux

    In Realm of the Wood Elves, the reclusive race of Elves venture out into the Old World with the largest piece of downloadable content for Total War: WARHAMMER.

  • 20 node, retro gaming BBS is alive!

    Ever have the urge to play some of the best BBS games of the 1980’s and 1990’s?

    Games like Trade Wars 2002, Legend of the Red Dragon (LORD), Barren Realms Elite, The Pit, and others defined multiplayer gaming (via dial-up modem) for over a decade.

Games for GNU/Linux

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more