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Gaming

AMDGPU-PRO Beta 2 vs. Mesa 11.3 + Linux 4.6: Very Competitive For Linux Gamers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Following last week's AMDGPU-PRO 16.20.3 "Beta 2" driver release of AMD's new hybrid driver stack for Linux that makes use of the AMDGPU open-source kernel DRM driver with the closed-source OpenGL driver derived from Catalyst / Radeon Software, I set out to do a fresh open vs. closed-source driver comparison. For the Radeon R9 285, R9 290, and R9 Fury, I compared the performance of this new AMDGPU-PRO driver against Mesa 11.3-devel Git and Linux 4.6 for the latest open-source driver stack.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Vulkan support for Dota 2 to come next week

    Dota 2 is the first Valve game that will support the new Vulkan API and it could be as soon as next week.

    Considering how early Valve had access to it, and even showed off a demo of it way before release of Vulkan I am still surprise Talos beat it to be the first public Vulkan game. Well, I say surprised, but "Valve Time" is a thing right?

    It's exciting, as when Valve switched to Source 2 which had native OpenGL the performance was much better on Linux (in terms of smoothness and actual FPS figures) and Vulkan is supposed to improve it even more so.

  • OpenRW: An Open-Source, Linux-Friendly Reimplementation Of GTA III

    There is OpenMW as a re-implementation of Morrowind, OpenRA as a re-implementation of Command and Conquer, and many other open-source game projects out there seeking to be free engine re-implementation of popular classic games.

  • OpenRW, an open source engine for Grand Theft Auto III

    I love open source! OpenRW joins the ranks of game engines like OpenMW (Morrowind), OpenRA (Command & Conquer, Red Alert) CorsixTH (Theme Hospital), OpenXcom (X-COM: UFO Defense) and many more.

    It's early days for the project, but I have high hopes that it will join the ranks of many other playable and open source game engines.

    [...]

    Find OpenRW on github. It's licensed under the GPL.

  • Overfall, the awesome mix of adventure, RPG and strategy is now fully released and available for Linux

    I have a real soft spot for Overfall, it looks simple, but it has some really engaging gameplay with it mixing up a few different styles. The Linux version works really well too.

    What I especially like is the developers including a monitor picker in the games options, that was really useful for me as a dual-monitor user.

  • CRYPTARK, the fantastic 2D sci-fi roguelike shooter has a massive update with a co-op option

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • First Steps with OpenVR and the Vive on Linux

    First up, if you're looking for my upcoming Vive unboxing video, this isn't it!

    When my Vive arrived earlier this month, I'd decided to let it sit in its box for a while. The most recent communication regarding official support was "We are working on it but it's not ready yet," and I had a lot of other work to focus on.

    About a month ago, an OSVR contributor had mentioned in the OpenHMD IRC channel that OSVR had a driver that interfaced with Valve's Vive driver and allowed OSVR to support the Vive under Linux. I didn't have time to look into it, but was glad to know that even if Linux support wasn't being advertised as ready by Valve, that there was something tangible to work with.

    The Vive's official launch came and went without advertised Linux support and it seemed that those users who did have Vives hadn't managed to jump through the correct hoops to get it functioning on Linux until last night when Linux user and developer SketchStick nudged me to take a look at some successes he'd had.

  • Shadwen, the new stealth game from Frozenbyte has released with day 1 Linux support

    Shadwen the brand new action and stealth game from Frozenbyte is now officially available. I can't wait to give it a go.

    I have requested review codes, so I will have to wait and see if Frozenbyte reply on that. Samsai has a copy so hopefully he will livestream it for you guys on Friday.
    Update: Frozenbyte have given me a copy. Thoughts to come when I've put time into it.

    It's nice to see Frozenbyte do something a bit different after Trine, so hopefully it's as good as it looks.

  • Frozenbyte's Shadwen Launches, Recommends NVIDIA Proprietary Driver On Linux
  • Hearts of Iron IV officially up for pre-order and will feature Linux support, releases June 6th

    Paradox fans may want to know that Hearts of Iron IV is officially available to pre-order and there's a trailer.

    It will release on June 6th with a basic price of £34.99 for the smallest edition available right up to £67.99.

    I've not played any of the previous games (which don't have Linux support), so I look forward to seeing what all the fuss is about. I am sure quite a number of people are excited by having this on Linux.

  • Unreal Tournament on Linux, checking up on the progress by Epic Games and how to get it running on Linux

    For those that don't know, or forgot, the new Unreal Tournament does in fact have a Linux version. I check on it now and then and it's really starting to come together.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.