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Gaming

Emulation or WINE

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Software
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games: Stardew Valley and Life is Strange

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Gaming

Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • Why and How to Use Ring Instead of Skype on Linux

    It is like when you say Ring is an alternative to Skype. No, no, it's not. Skype is ghastly. It is proprietary; it is demonstrably insecure; there is evidence that Microsoft uses Skype to siphon off conversations to the NSA; and the GNU/Linux version still lags behind the Windows one. So no, Ring is not an alternative to Skype. Ring is a full-featured, open source product that you need to know about.

  • In Search of a Linux iTunes Replacement

    If I’m to pick a favorite from just these three, I suppose it’s going to be Clementine. Sure, it might be a bit more resource intensive than the other choices and a little broken in places, but I still prefer it to what iTunes has become. As far as the differences between trying new software in a Windows versus a Linux environment, I’m not going to lie: finding my way around Linux is taking some getting used to. And that’s okay — I expected as much. Just as I’d expect trying to haggle in Portuguese might be a bit rough at first if I’m just learning the language and I’ve only known English until now.

  • 5 tricks for getting started with Vim
  • Vim or Emacs: Which text editor do you prefer?
  • Opera Developer Update Lands RSS Reader, Chromecast Capability

    For those still using the cross-platform Opera web browser, a new developer build is available today that provides new features.

    New to the Opera 40.0.2296.0 developer update that was released today is a built-in RSS reader. Opera admits this initial RSS reader is "pretty rough on the edges" but great to see them finally supporting it with their latest browser.

  • Opera developer 40.0.2296.0 update

    As we approach midsummer in this area, we would like to offer a developer update which includes one feature that was frequently asked for. You may now realize it is…

  • Kentucky Route Zero Act IV now Available

    The newest installment in the episodic adventure game Kentucky Route Zero has been released after a two year wait.

  • Overlord and Overlord: Raising Hell released for Linux, some thoughts and a port report

    Overlord and the Overlord: Raising Hell expansion have been ported to Linux thanks to Virtual Programming. I was able to get advanced access yesterday and here are some thoughts.

    Note: The Linux release is not yet on Steam. This is a DRM free release from their own store. It's using MojoSetup, so you can install it wherever you please.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • System Shock Remaster Linux Demo Released, System Requirements Shared

    Earlier this year a Kickstarter campaign was started to develop a System Shock remaster from the ground up. Not only has that campaign been fully funded now, it has 10 days to reach its stretch goal of $1.1 million that would allow developers to create a Linux and Mac OS port of the game. Right now the game is above $1 million so the campaign only has to raise less than $0.1 million to make this port a reality.

  • Gallium3D Optimizations Published For BioShock Infinite

    Marek Olšák of AMD has been working on some Gallium3D optimizations for boosting the performance of the popular BioShock Infinite game on Linux.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • GDC Europe survey shows 17% of developers plan to release Linux titles

    GDC Europe ran a survey of 800 games industry professionals who attended a previous GDC event and about 17% stated they plan a game for Linux.

    It's a really weird survey, as it pulls Windows/Mac together, but has Linux by itself. It would make more sense to have all three separated. They also say PC when they mean Windows, which is always annoying to see. Still, it's a pretty healthy percentage considering only a few years ago it would have probably been 0-1%.

    It's also amusing to see them do the survey, have Linux as an option which beats out multiple other platforms, yet they don't mention anything about Linux in the text.

  • Tyranny, the new RPG from Paradox and Obsidian is looking great in this new video
  • Ballistic Overkill FPS updated, lots of changes and still works great

    Ballistic Overkill is the fast paced FPS game I have fallen in love with and it just gained a tasty update.

    The game has down away with a single health station on the map, to now have health packs spread throughout the map. An interesting and needed change, but I feel they respawn far too quickly.

    The map voting system is much better. Instead of always being on a single mode, you pick a single map and each map comes with a different game mode. That makes the game feel a lot fresher in my opinion and helps stop me getting bored in longer sessions.

  • Lost Sea action and adventure game released for Linux, some thoughts

    Lost Sea is a really nice idea, mixing up action, adventure, RPG and random generation together to create something interesting. You also lose almost all progress when you die, so there's the punishment factor here. You don't lost everything, you get a bit of gold and XP for each tablet you get on the previous run.

    You sail from island to island collecting treasures, killing monsters and collecting stone tablets that enable you to move further along in your journey. It all sounds pretty good, but I've found the game to be rather lacking in every aspect of its design.

    The combat just seems so basic and lifeless it really lets down what could have been a very exciting game. You can upgrade your skillset to have a few nice extras but even so, it still feels a bit empty. It's not terrible though, just not really all that challenging at all, no real excitement factor to the combat. It's literally mash X a few times, maybe use a skill if you need too and—done.

  • Kingdom Rush Frontiers coming to Linux after the initial Windows launch
  • Darkest Dungeon updated, has some needed Linux fixes
  • Undertale now available for Linux on GOG

    Undertale recently released on Steam, but this weird 2D RPG is now also available DRM free on GOG. I know a few of you were waiting for this!

    My friends at GOG sent over a key and I can confirm it seems to work fine, I didn't encounter any obvious issues in my testing of the GOG build.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

  • How to video conference without people hating you
    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.
  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event
    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week. Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.
  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1
    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania. The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018. A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.
  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper
    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
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Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more