Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Several Sites Publish Their Thoughts On Steam Machines & The Steam Controller

Filed under
Debian
Gaming

The most in-depth ones I have found yet is engadget and ars technica who deserve some applause here, as they went into quite a bit of detail, and more so than any other website.

They seem reasonably positive about the whole thing. They do note the interface does still have its issues, like accidentally introducing a bug that shows Windows games which will get ironed out properly (one would hope anyway!).

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

AMD Lose Another Big Name, This Time To Nvidia

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

After CPU architect Jim Keller left AMD recently, Phil Rogers has now also left and joined up with Nvidia. According to the article on fudzilla his defection to Nvidia was kept under wraps, I wonder why.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Open-Source Doom 3 Spin Updated With Many New Features

    While many initially looked at ioDoom3 as the exciting fork of id Software's id Tech 4 / Doom 3 source-code as it was done by some of the same folks as ioquake3, there sadly hasn't been much to report on in recent times for the project. Fortunately, the independent "dhewm3" is making strides as an open-source Doom 3 project.

  • Civilization: Beyond Earth - Rising Tide Expansion Released & Thoughts From A Civ Addict
  • Unity To Abandon Their Web Player In Favor Of WebGL

    For games developed in Unity and designed to be run from the web-browser, Unity has offered a Web Player plug-in for browsers. However, with Chrome dropping NPAPI support and other browsers changing their plug-in handling, Unity is dropping that plug-in to instead just use open web APIs and using WebGL for graphics. Unity has already supported WebGL but now it's about the death of their Web Player.

  • Divinity: Original Sin 2 Linux or Mac Ports Uncertain

    While Divinity: Original Sin 2 is pretty much confirmed for Microsoft Windows following its successful Kickstarter campaign, the same cannot be said for the Linux or Mac version of the game.

    The independent Larian Studios wants to remain publisher-free, and collected little over $2 million with its Kickstarter fund campaign. However, despite expectations of a Linux/Mac port for the game, the developers have pretty clearly stated that they cannot afford to port the game on other platforms at the time of release.

  • Virtual Programming Is Porting Four More Titles To Linux

    Virtual Programming has published their latest in-development titles for Mac and Linux, which includes the Overlord and Saints Row games making it over from Windows.

    While many Linux gamers particularly don't like Virtual Programming Linux game ports due to their use of the eON wrapper layer, which started out as a train wreck but has improved for recent games like DiRT Showdown, they're bringing more games over to Linux.

  • SteamOS 2.0, emulators on Raspberry Pi, and more open gaming news
  • Unigine 2.0 Officially Released With Big Improvements For This Linux-Friendly Engine

    While the Unigine engine isn't used by too many games compared to its presence in simulation and other industries, it remains one of my favorite engines for its top-notch Linux support over the years, beautiful OpenGL capabilities, and powering the most demanding Linux graphics tech demos. Today Unigine Corp is excited to announce the release of Unigine 2.0.

  • Valve Is Trolling Us With A New Half-Life 3 Leak
  • HL3 References In Dota 2 Are Raising Eyebrows

    SteamDB has revealed some new references to Half-Life 3 content within today's Dota 2 game update.

    Most evident is "hl3.txt", which is a file defining some game assets while there are also some other new game definition files. Some of the definitions do differ with Source 2 and there's also some VR-related definitions.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Massive Steam Client Update Brings Chromium 45, Big Picture Improvements, FLAC Support

Filed under
Gaming

Hear ye, hear ye! Valve just pushed a few minutes ago a new, massive update to the stable branch of their Steam desktop client for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

Read more

Also: Steam for Linux Beta Client Gets More Fixes in New Update

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Valve Makes SteamOS 2.0 the Official Distro, Now Based on Debian 8.2

Filed under
Debian
Gaming

Valve is making SteamOS 2.0 the official version supported by the company, and it looks like it might ship with the Steam Machines after all.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD

BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS