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Gaming

SteamOS update 96 released

Filed under
Debian
Gaming

An updated installer ISO and ZIPs[repo.steampowered.com] are also included. Major changes here include fully unattended installation (no more mucking around with steam/desktop logins and manually running scripts), multiple language support and pre-installing all the firmware packages.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Maratis: An Open Source, Visual Game Engine for Linux

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

A new open source game engine has been launched by the name of Maratis. It is a portable open source, visual game engine that can be used both by game developers and artists alike.

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Firefox Becomes Gaming Platform With Unreal Engine Support

Filed under
Moz/FF
Gaming

You'll soon be able to stream and play highly realistic three-dimensional video games from within the Mozilla Firefox browser. Mozilla recently announced that the most recent version of its Firefox browser can run games developed with the Unreal Engine by Epic Games, which forms the backbone of many major 3D video games.

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Linux community wants Witcher 3

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Gaming on Linux is picking up and so is the demand for more and more games to be available on the platform. Witcher 3 users now want the game to be made available on Linux at the same time when it hits other operating systems. Linux users are requesting CD Project Red to consider Linux as a standard platform for the Witcher 3 along with their other games in development.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

IGF Winner Cart Life Departs Steam For Open Source Waters

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

Before Valve began greenlighting games by the bucketload, busting onto Steam was seen as a massive accomplishment for an indie developer. So it always raises one’s curiosity when a game’s creator decides to leave the berth of the all-mighty digital distributor for the lands of open source. In this case, it’s Richard Hofmeier and his IGF prize-winning title Cart Life.

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Opening up Linux: Is the OS becoming ripe for game development?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Develop investigates how recent changes and support from gaming's biggest companies is making Linux a viable option for developers

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Also new: Witcher 2 available for download for Linux users

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Crytek demos CryEngine for Linux at GDC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

If you've been following the news lately, it'll come as no surprise that Crytek is working on a Linux port of its game engine. At GDC today, I had a first-hand look at CryEngine running on Linux, and I was able to get some extra details from the Crytek folks on the scene.

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Canonical Joins The Document Foundation's LibreOffice Project Advisory Board

Today, July 26, 2016, Canonical and The Document Foundation (TDF) announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu operating system had joined the LibreOffice project Advisory Board. If you're using the Ubuntu Linux OS on your personal computer, you are aware of the fact that the award-winning LibreOffice office suite is installed by default. Canonical chose to use LibreOffice as the default office suite for its widely-used GNU/Linux operating system since the first release of the open-source software in early 2011. Now that Canonical announced the availability of Snaps as universal binary packages for Ubuntu and other supported GNU/Linux distributions, many application developers decided to offer their software in the Snap package format, and it looks like The Document Foundation is among the first to adopt the latest Snappy technologies for LibreOffice. Read more

Linux Filesystems Explained — EXT2/3/4, XFS, Btrfs, ZFS

The first time I installed Ubuntu on my computer, when I was sixteen, I was astonished by the number of filesystems that were available for the system installation. There were so many that I was left overwhelmed and confused. I was worried that if I picked the wrong one my system might run too slow or that it might be more problematic than another. I wanted to know which was the best. Since then, things have changed quite a bit. Many Linux distributions offer a ‘standard’ filesystem that an installation will default to unless otherwise specified. I think this was a very good move because it assists newcomers in making a decision and being comfortable with it. But, for those that are still unsure of some of the contemporary offerings, we’ll be going through them today. Read more

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