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Gaming

Games: Gift of Parthax, Galaxy Champions TV, Shovel Knight: King of Cards, BlockShip Wars, 0°N 0°W

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Gaming

Games: The Darkside Detective, "Proton NVIDIA Users", Pig Eat Ball, Wizard of Legend and Total War: WARHAMMER II

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Gaming
  • Adventure game 'The Darkside Detective: Season 2' is on Kickstarter

    Ready for more adventures? The Darkside Detective: Season 2 will follow on from the original and it's currently on Kickstarter.

  • For those on NVIDIA, the 396.54.05 driver seems to have some noteworthy performance improvements

    It seems NVIDIA have been working on some improvements to their Linux driver, as the 396.54.05 beta driver seems to have improved performance in various games.

    Tweeting about it, Valve's Pierre-Loup Griffais said "Proton NVIDIA users: the latest 396.54.05 Vulkan Beta driver contains significant performance improvements in GPU-bound scenarios.". He also noted that those on Ubuntu can grab it from a different PPA provided by Canonical for easy installation.

    Looking around, it seems he's right on the money. Talking about it in our forum (also reddit), users noted improvements to games run on Linux. The improvements look pretty impressive too. The focus of everyone's testing seems to be DXVK which benefits from the new driver, so I went to test.

  • Pig Eat Ball is one of the weirdest games I've seen for a while, releasing with Linux support this month

    I've seen a lot of games in my time, yet developers somehow still find ways to surprised me. Pig Eat Ball looks totally weird, but also quite fun.

    Funded on Fig back in back in April, thanks to 252 backers along with a fair bit of help from Fig directly. The developer has now announced, that the release is expected on September 27th.

  • The rather good magical dungeon crawler 'Wizard of Legend' has a teaser out for the Sky Palace update

    Wizard of Legend, the dungeon crawler that has you take on the role of a Wizard is getting a fresh content update named Sky Palace.

    The update is going to include more enemy types, more special signature moves and a new location to fight in. I'm especially excited by this, because it's a really damn fun game to play by yourself and with others. I've enjoyed it just as much alone, as I have playing in local co-op with the mini-me.

  • Feral confirmed that Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux will use Vulkan

    Good news for those who want games that perform well, as Feral Interactive confirmed that Total War: WARHAMMER II will use Vulkan on Linux.

GNU/Linux Games: The Culling, Overwatch, and Frozen Synapse 2

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Gaming

Games: The Rise of the Tomb Raider, Nimbatus - The Space Drone Constructor, Airmen, Hyperspace Dogfights, Descenders, COLINA: Legacy, Deep Sky Derelicts, We Were Here

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Gaming

Valve Increases Wine Usage, Blizzard Bans Wine Users

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Gaming
  • Valve have now pushed out all the recent beta changes in Steam Play's Proton to everyone

    For those of you sticking with the stable channel of Steam Play's Proton system, Valve have today rolled out all the recent beta changes for everyone.

    Previously, you had access to Proton 3.7-3 which was what everyone used by default and you could also use the "Compatibility tool" dropdown in the Steam Play options section to switch to a beta to have the latest updates. Valve must now consider all the changes stable enough, as Proton 3.7-6 is now the default. There's another beta channel now, which is still currently at 3.7-6 but it should remain where the latest changes go.

    There's quite a lot of improvements included since the initial release, like: automatic mouse capturing in fullscreen windows by default, performance improvements, certain game compatibility improvements, an updated build of DXVK, more display resolution support and so on. You can see the full changelog here.

  • Some Linux Gamers Using Wine/DXVK To Play Blizzard's Overwatch Reportedly Banned

    Multiple individuals are reporting that they have been just recently banned by Blizzard for playing their games -- seemingly Overwatch is the main title -- when using Wine with the DXVK D3D11-over-Vulkan translation layer.

    Blizzard support has said they are not banning Linux gamers for using these "emulation" techniques but not officially supported.

    However, per this Reddit thread with one of the users writing into Phoronix, there have been recent bans to Linux gamers and the only expressed common denominator seems to be the use of Wine and DXVK.

GNU/Linux Version of Life is Strange: Before the Storm

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm is now officially available on Linux

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm, the three-part prequel to the original Life is Strange ported to Linux by Feral Interactive is now available. After very much enjoying the first game, I can't wait to dive into this!

    While the original was made by DONTNOD Entertainment, this time around it was developed by Deck Nine and published by Square Enix.

  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm Is Out Now for Linux and macOS

    UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive announced today the availability of the Life is Strange: Before the Storm adventure video game for the Linux and macOS platforms.

    Developed by Deck Nine and published by Square Enix, Life is Strange: Before the Storm was launched on August 31, 2017, as the second installment in the BAFTA award-winning franchise. The all-new three-part standalone story features new and beautiful artwork set three years before the events of the first Life is Strange game.

  • Life Is Strange: Before The Storm Is Now Out For Linux

    Feral Interactive released today Life is Strange: Before the Storm for Linux and macOS.

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm is the latest in this episodic game series from Deck Nine and ported to macOS and Linux by Feral Interactive. Before the Storm was released for Windows in late 2017.

Games: Forsaken Remastered, Megaquarium, Nimbatus, BFF or Die, Unity 2018.3 Beta

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Gaming
  • Forsaken Remastered adds Vulkan support to the Linux version

    For those who love testing out games with Vulkan, do take a look at Forsaken Remastered which was updated last night for Linux to add in Vulkan support. To enable it, simply load the game and go into the video options where it will now let you pick your graphics API.

  • Build the aquarium you always wanted in Megaquarium, out now for Linux

    Megaquarium is like theme park for those who love fish and it's now officially available with same-day Linux support. Developed by Twice Circled, who were responsible for the rather good Big Pharma which also has a Linux version. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    As someone who is fascinated by ocean life, I often visit our local aquarium to learn a little and take it all in. This is probably why Megaquarium speaks to me on a level other such tycoon builders don't.

  • Nimbatus - The Space Drone Constructor has come a long way since the Kickstarter, Early Access soon

    Nimbatus - The Space Drone Constructor, as the name might suggest, has you building drones, which you can directly control or give them some autonomous features. The closed alpha is extremely promising and a lot of fun to play with.

  • Puzzle game BFF or Die is out with Linux support, interesting in both singleplayer and local co-op

    BFF or Die is an interesting puzzle game from ASA Studio that I was testing before release (key provided by the developer), one that offers a decent experience if you're alone or if you have friends around for some local co-op.

    [...]

    The design is pretty good, while the early levels are naturally as easy as breathing, the later levels certainly get a lot more interesting when many more gameplay elements start coming together. Especially tricky when you think you've mapped out the level in your brain and new enemies appear to throw a spanner in the works, even more so in single-player when you're controlling a light to see what's around independently of your movement.

  • Unity 2018.3 Beta Promotes Vulkan Editor No Longer Experimental, Various Linux Fixes

    The first public beta of the Unity 2018.3 game engine is now available for testing and evaluation.

    Unity 2018.3 beta is shipping today with various workflow improvements, improvements to the Shader Graph, drops their legacy particle system, and other changes. From their overview there isn't all that much to get excited about by Linux gamers...

Games: Super Combat Fighter, Akane, Valve's Steam Play and Proton, Paratopic, Turok 2: Seeds of Evil

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Gaming
  • Linux will get another fighting game with Super Combat Fighter currently on Kickstarter

    One genre we certainly don't have enough in is fighting games, so I'm pleased to see that Super Combat Fighter [Official Site] will be released for Linux.

    Initially, the Kickstarter didn't actually mention Linux support.

  • Akane is an addictive blood-soaked slasher that's now out with Linux support

    The blood-soaked neon-fuelled slasher Akane [Official Site] released with Linux support, I took a look to see of it's worth your pennies. Note: Personal purchase.

    They did have a bit of a launch mess-up when it came to the Linux version, where it resulted in an empty download. I messaged them how to fix it and they managed to get it going quickly enough.

  • Game porter Ethan Lee gives his thoughts on Valve's Steam Play and Proton

    For today's article I spoke to Ethan Lee, developer of FNA and who has ported something around 40+ titles to Linux. He also recently helped get Dust: An Elysian Tail ported to the Nintendo Switch and so he certainly knows his stuff.

    As a reminder, you can see my initial thoughts about it all here. I did speak to game porters Feral Interactive in that article, although they only gave one line about plans not changing (which is good to know). Aspyr Media didn’t give a public comment for it and Virtual Programming still aren’t replying to our emails.

    If you missed it, you can also see our interview with the creator of DXVK, one of the projects that makes up Steam Play. Again, this article was supposed to be part of a larger one, but given Ethan Lee's thoughts here (and all the work he's done for Linux gaming) I felt it deserved an article by itself.

  • Paratopic, an atmospheric retro-3D horror adventure is out and it's a really strange experience

    Developer Arbitrary Metric have put out a rather interesting retro-3D horror title with Linux support and it's quite an experience. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    This is actually the "Definitive Cut edition" (the previous version didn't have a Linux version), which includes new areas to visit as well as the usual tweaks and improvements you would expect from an updated version.

  • Turok 2: Seeds of Evil is now officially available on Linux, more coming from Icculus

    As a reminder, this isn't the original Turok 2 but an enhanced version from Nightdive Studios that was ported to Linux by Ryan "Icculus" Gordon in beta form back in July.

Games: Open Match, Galaxy Champions TV, Need to Know, Solace Crafting, INSOMNIA: The Ark, Victory At Sea

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Gaming

5 Sparkling Game Engines – develop great cross-platform games

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Development
Gaming

It’s been ages since we’re recommended the best game engines. After a lot of testing, it’s clear there’s a few amazing open source game engines that need to be added to our recommendations in this genre.

Game engines offer huge benefits to game developers. The main functionality they provide is the library of core functions used in a computer game. This often includes a realtime rendering engine for 2D or 3D graphics, physics engine with collision detection, a character animation system, scene graph, sound, artificial intelligence, threading, networking, input, streaming localization support, debugging tools, integration with languages, and the provision of performance monitoring and optimization tools.

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Android Leftovers

Elementary OS Juno Beta 2 Released

Elementary OS June beta 2 is now available to download. This second beta build of the Ubuntu-based Linux distribution touts a number of changes over the elementary OS june beta released back in July. Due to the shifting sands on which Juno is built the elementary team advise those planning on testing the release to do so by making a fresh install rather than doing an upgrade from beta 1 or (worse) an older version of elementary OS. Read more

today's howtos

Linux - The beginning of the end

You should never swear at people under you - I use the word under in the hierarchical sense. Colleagues? Well, probably not, although you should never hold back on your opinion. Those above you in the food chain? It's fair game. You risk it to biscuit it. I say, Linus shouldn't have used the language he did in about 55-65% of the cases. In those 55-65% of the cases, he swore at people when he should have focused on swearing at the technical solution. The thing is, people can make bad products but that does not make them bad people. It is important to distinguish this. People often forget this. And yes, sometimes, there is genuine malice. My experience shows that malice usually comes with a smile and lots of sloganeering. The typical corporate setup is an excellent breeding ground for the aspiring ladder climber. Speaking of Linus, it is also vital to remember that the choice of language does not always define people, especially when there are cultural differences - it's their actions. In the remainder of the cases where "bad" language was used (if we judge it based on the approved corporate lingo vocab), the exchange was completely impersonal - or personal from the start on all sides - in which case, it's a different game. The problem is, it's the whole package. You don't selective get to pick a person's attributes. Genius comes with its flaws. If Linus was an extroverted stage speaker who liked to gushy-mushy chitchat and phrase work problems in empty statements full of "inspiring" and "quotable" one-liners, he probably wouldn't be the developer that he is, and we wouldn't have Linux. So was he wrong in some of those cases? Yes. Should he have apologized? Yes, privately, because it's a private matter. Definitely not the way it was done. Not a corporate-approved kangaroo court. The outcome of this story is disturbing. A public, humiliating apology is just as bad. It's part of the wider corporate show, where you say how sorry you are on screen (the actual remorse is irrelevant). Linus might actually be sorry, and he might actually be seeking to improve his communication style - empathy won't be part of that equation, I guarantee that. But this case - and a few similar ones - set a precedence. People will realize, if someone like Linus gets snubbed for voicing his opinion - and that's what it is after all, an opinion, regardless of the choice of words and expletives - how will they be judged if they do something similar. But not just judged. Placed in the (social) media spotlight and asked to dance to a tune of fake humility in order to satisfy the public thirst for theatrics. You are not expected to just feel remorse. You need to do a whole stage grovel. And once the seed of doubt creeps in, people start normalizing. It's a paradox that it's the liberal, democratic societies that are putting so much strain on the freedom of communication and speech. People forget the harsh lessons of the past and the bloody struggles their nations went through to ensure people could freely express themselves. Now, we're seeing a partial reversal. But it's happening. The basket of "not allowed" words is getting bigger by the day. This affects how people talk, how they frame their issues, how they express themselves. This directly affects their work. There is less and less distinction between professional disagreement and personal slight. In fact, people deliberately blur the lines so they can present their business ineptitude as some sort of Dreyfuss witchhunt against their glorious selves. As an ordinary person slaving in an office so you can pay your bills and raise your mediocre children, you may actually not want to say something that may be construed as "offensive" even though it could be a legitimate complaint, related to your actual work. This leads to self-censored, mind-numbing normalization. People just swallow their pride, suppress their problems, focus on the paycheck, and just play the life-draining corporate game. Or they have an early stroke. Read more Also: Google Keeps Pushing ChromeOS and Android Closer Together