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Gaming

Alienware say Steam Machine will increase Linux gamers by “20, 30 fold. Overnight”

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Linux gaming has seen massive growth in the past two years, ever since Valve began openly supporting the open source operating system. That growth is nothing compared to what it will be after the launch of their Steam Machines, says Alienware’s product manager, Marc Diana.

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Seven Out of Ten Most Played Games on Steam Have Linux Support

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Valve is looking very seriously at Linux as a genuine replacement for Windows and the company has put a lot of effort into it. An interesting way of seeing just how much they care is to check the top ten most played games on Steam.

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Sabayon Linux 14.06 Can Be Turned into a Gentoo-Based Steam Machine

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Gentoo
Gaming

Sabayon 14.06 is based on Gentoo and that is not something that you see every day. In fact, there are very few Linux distros out there that are using Gentoo as a base and it's good to see that developers take the time and the effort to utilize something else than Debian and Ubuntu.

Another interesting thing brought by this release is its rolling release model, which is not all that common. There were some talks to get this model working with Ubuntu, for example, but developers figured it was too much work.

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First handheld Steam Machine revealed

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Linux
Gaming

A “Steamboy” handheld gaming console teased in a video appears to be the first portable Steam Machine to emerge for Valve’s Linux-based Steam OS platform.

A Steamboy Project site registered under a Steamboy Machine copyright posted a teaser video of what looks to be the first handheld console form-factor Steam Machine (see farther below). The video shows a handheld device with a screen in the middle that resembles a cross between the now-delayed Valve Steam Controller and a Sony PlayStation Vita device.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Leftovers: Games

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Gaming

Linux gaming rising: 7 big-name PC games that now call Linux home

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Linux's gaming potential is about more than SteamOS and blockbuster ports. Earlier this year, GOG.com announced plans to bring a bevy of classic games to Ubuntu and Mint Linux this fall, with more than 100 games expected to be available at launch. Expect them to work just fine with SteamOS when the operating system finally launches sometime in 2015, too.

Speaking of Steam, it's not the big-name games but the indies that are driving Steam for Linux's true growth. After launching with a mere 60 native games just over a year ago, Steam for Linux now stands at more than 300 games strong—tremendous growth in a very short time. More and more games—like Europa Universalis IV, and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, and Dota 2, and Starbound—are starting to launch Linux versions alongside Windows counterparts.

It's still not quite the year of Linux on the desktop, but one thing's for certain: Linux's gaming prospects are looking brighter than ever before.

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Will Linux Ever Be Regarded as an Equal to Windows and Consoles at E3?

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Linux is slowly becoming a gaming alternative, but it's still a long way from consoles and Windows. How long will it take to see Linux represented at the E3 Expo in full effect, just like all the other platforms?

Making predictions is very hard, especially about the future. This simple statement from physicist Niels Bohr explains very well why it's difficult to anticipate what will happen in the world of technology. Some things evolve faster than we can predict and others seem to stagnate...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Superb Interstellar Marines Tactical FPS Arrives on Steam for Linux

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Gaming

nterstellar Marines, a tactical FPS developed and published by Zero Point Software, has just received Linux support with the latest patch.

Interstellar Marines is a very promising first-person shooter and its developers said that they took inspiration from Half-Life, System Shock 2, and Rainbow Six 3: Raven Shield. The game has been built mainly as a multiplayer experience, but a limited single-player is also available.

The latest update for the Interstellar Marines also brought support for the Linux platform and it looks like this title aims to be one of the best-looking on the open source platform...

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At Long Last, Linux Gets Dynamic Tracing

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