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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Steam And Linux On PS4- Traces of AMD’s Bonaire GPU found

    In another attempt by hackers to run steam and Linux on PS4, it hit a dead end: they could not get the PS4’s GPU to display any sort of output or even process any kind of graphics. Much like any dead end, if you need a workaround you research the internet. So, the hackers did the same and found a chink in the armor of GPU script.

  • Steam’s Linux and OpenGL Efforts Forced Microsoft to Take PC Gaming Seriously: Former Valve Employee

    Ex-Valve employee Rich Geldreich — who worked on games such as Portal 2 and Linux versions of Valve’s games based on the original Source Engine — took to his blog to share the impact Valve’s efforts with Linux and OpenGL had on the industry. Particularly in getting Microsoft to support PC gaming better.

    One post on Valve’s Linux blog, entitled ‘Faster Zombies’ is of interest as it showed off what performance Valve was able to get out of its games running Linux and OpenGL, which was faster than using Windows with Direct3D on the same systems. Written by Gabe Newell himself, it resulted in Microsoft paying the company a visit.

  • Valve's Linux support 'lit a fire' under Microsoft execs, says ex-Valve engineer

    In the summer of 2013, Valve made a show of throwing support behind Linux by moving to port its game engine and Steam platform to run on the cult favorite operating system, generating a bit of cautious optimism among game devs.

    PC game makers may recall that Valve even launched its own Linux-focused blog, and shortly after launch it published a post outlining how the company had tweaked Left 4 Dead 2 to the point that it actually ran better on Linux using OpenGL than on Windows 7 using Direct3D. Now, years later, devs may be curious to hear that one of the primary engineers on that project believes it helped encourage Microsoft to bolster its support for Direct3D tech.

    Longtime game engineer Rich Geldreich (who currently works at Unity and occasionally blogs on Gamasutra) was working at Valve on the Steam Linux project in 2013, and this week he published a post to his personal blog reminiscing about what it was like to be there in the room with company chief Gabe Newell helping to write that Left 4 Dead 2 Linux performance post -- and how Valve's big push for Linux influenced the industry in some surprising ways.

  • Beamdog (Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition) are working on another game, testers needed

    It seems Beamdog may be doing a revamp of another title, or possibly even an original title. They have sent word that they need game testers, including Linux gamers.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • We have 99 keys of IMPOSSIBALL to give away to Linux gamers willing to test it out

    The developer of IMPOSSIBALL [Steam, Official Site] is working to bring the game to Linux, so they have sent us tons of keys to throw at you so you can test it.

    The developer isn't too familiar with Linux just yet, so they are bringing you all in to help polish it up.

    The beta is open to anyone who already owns it, otherwise you can claim your key below!

  • Eco - Global Survival Game, an incredibly interesting looking game that's already on Linux

    I was pointed towards 'Eco - Global Survival Game' [Steam, Official Site] thanks to a GOL follower and after looking it up, I decided to check it out a little more closely.

    The game was funded thanks to Kickstarter, where it bagged $202,760 towards helping development.

    The good news is that it's already on Linux. I read reports that early Alpha versions are already up to date for Linux, so I picked up a copy to test it out. I am pleased to personally confirm that it does have a Linux version already.

    I jumped right in on the only server that appeared to be compatible and I was genuinely surprised. The people on it welcomed me and pointed me to the starter guide right away. It's so damn refreshing to be greeted by friendly people in an online game!

    The game is really quite good-looking in a simple way. They've gone for a more cartoon-like visual style than realism, which is done really well. People have compared it to Minecraft, but it's not "blocky" at all. The gameplay is also vastly different, since you have skills, a social system and so on.

  • Retro-Pixel Castles updated again and will get a new name
  • Rich Geldreich, a former Valve developer, has an interesting blog post about Valve supporting Linux and OpenGL

    I fondly remember reading the Valve blog post about getting Left 4 Dead 2 running faster on Linux than it did on Windows. I remember feeling so happy about everything that was happening. Rich Geldreich was the one feeding the information to Gabe Newell himself (the owner of Valve) who wrote the blog post.

  • The "Faster Zombies!" blog post

    Gabe Newell himself wrote a lot of this post in front of me. From what I could tell, he seemed flabbergasted and annoyed that the team didn't immediately blog this info once we were solidly running faster in OpenGL vs. D3D. (Of course we should have blogged it ourselves! One of our missions as a team inside of Valve was to build a supportive community around our efforts.) From his perspective, it was big news that we were running faster on Linux vs. Windows. I personally suspect his social network didn't believe it was possible, and/or there was some deeper strategic business reason for blogging this info ASAP.

  • Steam's Linux Efforts Were Influential To Microsoft, Other Companies

MAME 0.181 Open-Source Arcade Machine Emulator to Support Sega's Altered Beast

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OSS
Gaming

A new maintenance update of the open-source and multiplatform MAME (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator) computer emulator tool landed to kick off 2017, with even more improvements and support for lots of arcade games.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Fail0verflow Demos Linux & Steam Running on PlayStation 4 Firmware 4.05 at 33C3

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Linux
Gaming

2016 ended in big style for hackers and security researchers from all over the world, who gathered together at the well-known Chaos Communication Congress (33c3) annual event organized by the Chaos Computer Club (CCC) of Germany

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Steam and SteamOS

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Gaming
  • Steam's Top Grossing Games Of 2016

    The Steam Store page goes on to list many other top 100 games, fortunately, just shy of half of them do have native Linux ports available. Those wanting to see the top revenue generating games on Steam for 2016 can find the list at store.steampowered.com.

  • Steam's Linux Marketshare Ended Slightly Lower For 2016

    While 0.01% change isn't too much, at this time last year the Steam Linux gaming market-share was 0.97%, or 0.1% higher. These numbers remain much lower than when Steam for Linux initially debuted and was closer to a 2% level. You could argue that Steam overall has picked up many new customers in 2016 so that the overall Linux market-share hasn't decreased in the number of Linux gamers, but it's not keeping up to other operating systems with Windows 10 not turning out to be a doomsday scenario some folks had once envisioned and SteamOS / Steam Machines haven't been some big white knight nor the other Linux desktop initiatives really panning out.

  • Progress Report

    After a lot of effort, I made significant progress with the Epson XP 231 in PCLinuxOS. Today, I managed to get it to work as it should. Some people are reporting my same problem with Steam on that OS, though...

    OpenMandriva Lx 3.1 pretty much does everything, except that Insync, which I believed was running, must be reinstalled every time to get it to work. You close the session and it's gone. Bad.

    Mageia 5.1's problem is the scanner. XSane reports that the usb port where it is found fails to open the device. I originally thought it was the file epwoka.conf at /etc/sane.d, but it does not seem to be the problem.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Happy New Year from GamingOnLinux

    GOL itself is now seven and a half years old, and hopefully we will be around for another seven at least!

  • Godot Continues Major Work On Its 3D Renderer For Release In 2017

    Open-source game engine Godot has been working on a multi-month project to vastly improve (and largely rewrite) its 3D renderer to make it as great as its 2D renderer. This work is being done for the Godot 3.0 engine and so far this 3D renderer is seeing a lot of movement.

    Godot 3.0 is aiming for a modern, clustered renderer that supports graphics features similar to other modern game engines like a physically based renderer, global illumination, shadow mapping, and more.

  • Intel's Clear Linux Is Working On Steam Support

    For those planning to do Linux gaming with Intel graphics hardware, you might soon have a new choice with the performance-oriented Clear Linux distribution out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center.

    Clear Linux developers are currently working on bringing up support for Steam in Clear Linux, something that isn't trivial to do as the operating system tends to be 64-bit focused while Steam still depends upon a mess of 32-bit packages, among other challenges. But Intel developer Arjan van de Ven has shared a photo on Twitter showing the basics of Steam appearing to work on Clear Linux.

  • Former Valve Developer: Steam Linux Project Was The Hardest

    Getting games on Linux and improving OpenGL drivers was the hardest challenge one veteran game developer has come across.

    Rich Geldreich who had worked at Valve for five years shared the most difficult work he's done: Steam for Linux. That's on top of his time at Valve he worked at Microsoft, served as an adjunct professor, was a head researcher for a company since acquired by Google, was CTO for a mobile games company, formerly a principal software engineer at Unity, now an independent consultant / software engineer, and an expert on data compression.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

Leftovers: BSD

  • BSD Mag: Understanding Unikernels by Russell Pavlicek
    The number of tasks which lend themselves to being unikernels is larger than you might think. In 2015, Martin Lucina announced the successful creation of a “RAMP” stack. A variant of the common “LAMP” stack (Linux. Apache, MySQL, PHP/Python), the “RAMP” stack employs NGINX, MySQL, and PHP each built on Rumprun. Rumprun is an instance of a Rump kernel, which is a unikernel system based on the modular operating system functions found in the NetBSD project. So even this very common solution stack can be successfully converted into unikernels.
  • Summary of the preliminary LLDB support project
    Operating systems can be called monitors as they handle system calls from userland processes. A similar task is performed by debuggers as they implement monitors for traced applications and interpret various events that occurred in tracees and are messaged usually with signals to their tracers. During this month I have started a new Process Plugin within LLDB to incept NativeProcessNetBSD - copied from NativeProcessLinux - implementing basic functionality and handling all the needed events in the MonitorCallback() function. To achieve these tasks, I had to add a bunch of new ptrace(2) interfaces in the kernel to cover all that is required by LLDB monitors. The current Process Plugin for NetBSD is capable to start a process, catch all the needed events correctly and if applicable resume or step the process.
  • NetBSD Making Progress On LLDB Debugger Support
    NetBSD developers have been implementing the relevant interfaces needed for the LLVM debugger to effectively monitor and work on the operating system. As part of that they have also improved some of their own documentation, provided new ptrace interfaces, and more. Those interested in LLDB and/or NetBSD can learn more about this debugging work via this NetBSD.org blog post.

Firefox 51 Released With FLAC Audio Support, WebGL 2.0 By Default

Firefox 51.0 just hit Mozilla's FTP servers for those wanting the latest version of this open-source web-browser. Firefox 51 isn't a big feature release for end-users but notably does have support for FLAC audio, at long last! Great to see the web browsers finally shipping support out-of-the-box for this open-source audio codec. Read more

Intel Core i3 7100 Kabylake Linux Benchmarks

Last week I began delivering Linux Kabylake benchmarks with the Core i5 7600K while this week I finally am set to receive the Core i7 7700K. But for those curious how Kabylake is looking on the low-end, I picked up a Core i3 7100 as currently the cheapest Kabylake desktop processor. Here are some initial Linux benchmarks of this Core i3 processor on Ubuntu Linux. Read more