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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games: Space Pirates And Zombies, Rec Center Tycoon and More

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Gaming

Games: Cattails, Devader, Far-Out, DRM, Games for the Brain, Wine

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Gaming
  • What are you playing this weekend?

    There's been a lot of really great releases for Linux lately, it's getting incredibly hard to choose what to play.

  • Like cats? Cattails is a 2D RPG with light survival elements where you're a feral cat

    I was just casually browsing through my long list of things to cover, when I came across Cattails [Steam, Official Site] and the whole idea instantly caught my interest

  • Devader is an absolutely nuts shooter coming to Linux early next year

    Get ready to defend a dying civilization in Devader [Steam, Official Site], as this absolutely nuts shooter is coming to Linux early next year.

    The game was originally made for a game-jam back in December 2015 and has ended up turning into a full game. Interestingly, it seems the developer is using Javascript to develop it. If you're interested in seeing how the game has progressed, the developer put up a bunch of albums on imgur.

  • Hardcore retro-futuristic adventure game Far-Out looks awesome, coming to Linux

    Continuing my search for Linux games to come next year, I came across Far-Out [Steam, Official Site], a hardcore retro-futuristic adventure game and damn it looks good. It's being developed by one person, so I'm quite eager to see what they've been able to achieve.

    In this classic mix of horror and adventure, you play as geneticist Zack Paterson, the lone survivor of the Selene. Find out what happened to the ship and the crew and possibly escape. The developer said they've been inspired by games like The Dig, Space Quest, Full Throttle, Blade Runner and more.

  • DRM Strikes Again: Sonic Forces Just Plain Broken Thanks To Denuvo

    You may recall that Sega released its title Sonic Mania earlier this year, without bothering to inform anyone that the game came laden with Denuvo DRM and an always-online requirement. While Sega eventually patched the always-online requirement out, Denuvo remained, as did a hefty number of viciously negative Steam reviews from gamers that couldn't play the game as they intended or who were simply pissed off that DRM like Denuvo was included without mention to the public.

  • PSA: Sonic Forces' PC port is a hot mess

    Sonic Forces has already had a bit of an uphill battle to face releasing after Sonic Mania, but it looks like PC users are going to have an even rougher time of it. Thanks to the magic of Denuvo DRM, most users can't even progress past the second level in the game. Upon reaching the first mission with your custom avatar, the game promptly crashes with little explanation. Sega has been diligent in quickly issuing a patch, at least.

    Another big problem comes from some messed up calculations with the framerate limiter. For some reason, capping the framerate at 60 results in the game playing at half speed, around roughly 32 FPS. Using the 30 FPS cap results in 22 frames per second, which is what the cutscenes are locked to. As you can clearly tell from just a numerical standpoint, this is making things look ultra weird for a lot of people. At least Forces has an unlocked framerate option, but cutscenes are pretty much busted for the time being.

  • Simon Tatham’s Portable Puzzle Collection – Games for the Brain

    I recently published an article identifying 13 fun open source puzzle games. Each game is worth downloading. As a reader pointed out, the article didn’t include an exquisite puzzle collection. That’s Simon Tatham’s Portable Puzzle Collection. Let’s call it the Puzzle Collection for brevity.

    Every game in this Puzzle Collection is published under an open source license. And the collection is portable. What does that mean? Well, the games run on almost every modern operating system. Besides Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, you can play the games on anything that supports Java, or JavaScript. They can also be played on the web.

  • Wine 2.21 is out with Direct 3D indirect draws support, also fixes for The Witcher 3 and NieR:Automata

    The latest and greatest from the Wine development team is now available with Wine 2.21 which include support for Direct 3D indirect draws.

FreeCS: Aiming For An Open-Source Counter-Strike Implementation

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OSS
Gaming

The latest open-source game project working on an open-source engine re-implementation of a popular game is FreeCS that is aiming to be a free software re-implementation of Counter-Strike.

Before getting too excited, FreeCS isn't targeting Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Counter-Strike: Source, nor Counter-Strike 1.6, but rather Counter-Strike 1.5. Nevertheless, plenty of nostalgic Linux gamers will probably be interested.

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Games: Valve, Rust, Solus, Serious Sam 3, Football Manager 2018

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Gaming

Games and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Games: Sales, Sudden Strike 4, Mantis Burn Racing, Starblast, Desert Child, Beastmancer

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Gaming

Some Basic macOS 10.13 vs. Ubuntu 17.10 OpenGL Gaming Tests

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Following last week's F1 2017 launch for Linux which is making use of the Vulkan graphics API on Linux and Metal API on macOS, originally I set out to compare the macOS vs. Linux performance, but that didn't go quite as planned due to MacBook Pro woes. But here are some other OpenGL game tests between macOS and Ubuntu 17.10 Linux.

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Free Software/Games, Proprietary and Sales

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Software
Gaming

Games: Hand of Fate 2, Another Hitman Game, Steam Client Update, System Shock, In the Shadows, X-Plane

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu, Krita, GNOME Development

  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Could Switch to Breeze-Dark Plasma Theme by Default, Test Now
    The latest daily build live ISO images that landed earlier today for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) apparently uses the Breeze-Dark Plasma theme for the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment by default. However, we've been told that it's currently an experiment to get the pulse of the community. "Users running [Kubuntu] 18.04 development version who have not deliberately opted to use Breeze/Breeze-Light in their System Settings will also see the change after upgrading packages," said the devs. "Users can easily revert back to the Breeze/Breeze-Light Plasma themes by changing this in System Settings."
  • Interview with Rytelier
    The amount of convenience is very high compared to other programs. The amount of “this one should be designed in a better way, it annoys me” things is the smallest of all the programs I use, and if something is broken, then most of these functions are announced to improve in 4.0.
  • Grow your skills with GNOME
    For the past 3 years I’ve been working very hard because I fulfill a number of these roles for Builder. It’s exhausting and unsustainable. It contributes to burnout and hostile communication by putting too much responsibility on too few people’s shoulders.
  • GTK4, GNOME's Wayland Support & Vulkan Renderer Topped GNOME In 2017
  • A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support
    It's been four months since the release of GIMP 2.9.6 and while GIMP 2.9 developments are sadly not too frequent, the next GIMP 2.9.8 release is preparing a host of changes. Of excitement to those trying to use GIMP in a Wayland-based Linux desktop environment, GIMP's color picker has just picked up support for working on KDE/Wayland as well as some other Color Picker improvements to help GNOME/Wayland too. GIMP's Screenshot plugin also now has support for taking screenshots on KDE/Wayland either as a full-screen or individual windows. Granted, GIMP won't be all nice and dandy on Wayland itself until seeing the long-awaited GTK3 (or straight to GTK4) port.

Red Hat and Fedora

OSS Leftovers

  • How Open Source Databases Unlock Faster Computing
  • The art of the usability interview
    During a usability test, it's important to understand what the tester is thinking. What were they looking for when they couldn't find a button or menu item? During the usability test, I recommend that you try to observe, take notes, capture as much data as you can about what the tester is doing. Only after the tester is finished with a scenario or set of scenarios should you ask questions.
  • This open-source interview approach will help you avoid unconscious bias
    The lack of diversity in tech has been front and center this past year. Large tech companies have publicly vowed to fix the problem. But how? One answer is recognizing, acknowledging, and eliminating unconscious bias from the hiring process.
  • Microsoft Goes All In With Kubernetes
  • OpenBSD Now Officially Supports 64-bit ARM
    OpenBSD has graduated its 64-bit ARM (ARM64) architecture to being officially supported. As outlined in the OpenBSD Journal with a change made this week by lead OpenBSD developer Theo de Raadt, OpenBSD's ARM64 support is now considered officially supported.
  • LLVM Clang 6.0 Now Defaults To C++14
    Up to now LLVM's Clang C/C++ compiler has defaulted to using C++98/GNU++98 as its default C++ standard, but fortunately that's no more. Clang's default C++ dialect is now GNU++14 version of C++14 rather than GNU++98 (C++98). The older versions of the C++ standard remain available and can be set via the -std= argument, just as those previously could have specified C++11 / C++14 / C++17, but now in cases where not specified, GNU++14/C++14 is the default.
  • Tor Browser 7.0.11 is released
    Tor Browser 7.0.11 is now available from the Tor Browser Project page [1] and also from our distribution directory [2].

Android Leftovers