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Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Deus Ex: Mankind Divide for GNU/Linux: Updates

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Released for Linux & SteamOS, AMD GPUs Aren't Supported

    The moment you've all been waiting for is here, the UK-based video game publisher Feral Interactive has just made the big announcement today, November 3, 2016, for the launch of the Deus Ex: Mankind Divided video game on Steam for Linux, and SteamOS.

    Exactly two weeks ago, the guys behind Feral Interactive teased the Linux gaming community with yet another AAA title, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, after giving us a unique chance of playing the excellent Mad Max open world action-adventure video game just a day before announcing the Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Linux port.

  • Deus Ex Linux Requirements Announced, Only NVIDIA GPUs Supported

    Feral Interactive has published the system requirements for Deus Ex: Mankind Divided. As usual, it's the GPU/driver requirements that are always most interesting.

  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided released for Linux, port report and review

    I thought the recent port of Mad Max to Linux was our highlight of the year, but Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is a whole ‘nother level of fun.

    I have to say, I’m damn impressed at not only how many games Feral Interactive have ported this year, but also at the fact that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided came to Linux so soon after the original Windows release! Not quite the day-1 releases we need, but damn close.

  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Linux system requirements revealed, Nvidia only for now

    With the Deus Ex: Mankind Divided release happening tomorrow, Feral Interactive have released the system requirements. It will need a pretty decent rig.

    It is a heavy game, I've seen plenty of reports about the Windows version requiring a beefy PC to play it reasonably well, so this isn't surprising.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • New user statistics refresh, come check out the new data from Linux gamers

    Our user statistics page has been updated again, and it should now happen at the end of every month automatically.

    Here we can see that Ubuntu, is clearly the most popular Linux distribution amongst our Linux gaming visitors, with Arch coming in second place again (out of 1645 users)...

  • Linux gamers are sweet-talking Aspyr Media again

    It's really nice to see such appreciation from Linux gamers, hopefully it won't be for nothing.

    Will let you know as soon as we have any news to share on Civilization VI for Linux.

  • Steam Client Linux Beta Has A Fix For ZFS

    Valve released a Steam client beta for Halloween 2016, but without any apparent spooks.

    The announcement details appear to be revised from when I first looked at the 31 October update for Linux users as originally mentioned some other changes while now for Linux users does note just a fix for ZFS users.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Wine and Games

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer

    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on.

    Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.

  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows

    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%".

    This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.

  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media

    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats.

    Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.

  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great

    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever!

    I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

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