Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games: Police Stories, Total War: WARHAMMER II and GOG

Filed under
Gaming
  • Some thoughts on Police Stories, the recently released slower tactical top-down shooter

    Released earlier this month, Police Stories attempts to slow down the top-down shooter genre with a more tactical approach and most of the time it works quite well.

    The story here revolves around two cops, John Rimes and Rick Jones. Two old friends joined together as partners when you move to the city. Starting off from a simple call to action while on duty, things quickly spiral as you uncover links leading to something much bigger than expected.

  • Total War: WARHAMMER II - The Hunter & The Beast is now on Linux, plus The Empire Undivided update

    Feral Interactive have updated their port of Total War: WARHAMMER II for Linux to bring The Empire Undivided update and The Hunter & The Beast DLC is now supported.

    The Empire Undivided free content update is huge, so big it has a long dedicated post to it on the Total War blog. There's masses of bug fixes and overall balance improvements but also some huge feature adjustments too. The biggest changes looks like it happened for the Mortal Empires Campaign, which is what you get free if you own both Total War: WARHAMMER and Total War: WARHAMMER II. A big territory rework with 12 new regions, huge forts to battle through and empire factions now have access to the reworked Empire tech tree. The Empire Offices system was thrown out too, replaced with a new authority system. There's a huge amount more to it, so do take a read if you're interested in the full details.

  • DUSK with an exclusive map and Chasm come to GOG during their big 11th anniversary celebration

    GOG has been going for just about 11 years now, so they're having a big sale to celebrate. On top of that the retro FPS DUSK is now on GOG with an exclusive GOGATORIUM map for the endless mode and also CHASM is now on GOG too.

GNU/Linux Games and Panfrost

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Comedy point and click adventure Angelo and Deemon: One Hell of a Quest is out

    From developer Specialbit Studio, the quirky comedy point and click adventure Angelo and Deemon: One Hell of a Quest is officially out now with Linux support.

    A case of mistaken identity results in a blogger taking an unexpected holiday to Hell, so Angelo decides to record his journey in an attempt to become a little bit more famous and get some extra clicks and likes. Something like that anyway. The Ukrainian developer doesn't really give it a description that sells it too well.

  • Build and battle game From the Depths is officially launching this November

    Game developer Brilliant Skies sent word that their game From the Depths is getting ready to finally leave Early Access on November 7th. It's been in Early Access since August 2014, with a Linux version arriving a bit later.

    Much like Robocraft, the design and building in From the Depths is done block by block and you can create all sorts of incredibly weird and wonderful tools of destruction. Unlike Robocraft though, From the Depths seems to have a huge amount more depth to the building and the available game modes with much bigger battles too.

  • Drawn Down Abyss mixes an action-platformer with card abilities and it's out now

    A thoroughly odd experience this. Drawn Down Abyss from developer DaFluffyPotato looks like an ordinary pixel-art action-platform except it's also thoroughly different due to the card-based abilities.

  • Meet Alyssa Rosenzweig and Panfrost

    Panfrost is a free, open-source graphics stack for Arm Mali GPUs, focused on the popular Midgard series. While these chips are popular among Android devices, they have been historical thorns in Linux’s side, due to the closed nature of the official drivers. Panfrost aims to change that, bringing the benefits of open-source to the Mali world.

    What started out as a small community reverse-engineering effort has now matured into a reliable OpenGL ES 2.0 driver. Since May, I’ve been using Panfrost as my daily driver to program Panfrost. And yes, I’m answering these questions from a machine with Panfrost!

Games: Eternal Castle, Village Monsters and Dark Bestiary

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Eternal Castle: Remastered is now available on Linux

    The Eternal Castle is a remaster of an old classic, except it kind of isn't. The story is a little peculiar but the game does look quite fantastic and it's available now on Linux.

    In regards to the brand new Linux version, the developer sent out a Twitter post early this morning to note that a Linux version is now up thanks to the help of Linux game porter Ryan "Icculus" Gordon.

  • Open-ended village life sim 'Village Monsters' now has a release date and demo available

    While I've no doubt plenty will compare it to the likes of Stardew Valley, Village Monsters takes a rather different take on the village life sim.

    Written about a couple of times here on GamingOnLinux, as it certainly sounds intriguing. The world of Village Monsters takes place in a computer game, a world that has been long-forgotten. What happens to all the characters when they're done with? Well, that's for you to find out.

  • The combat-focused simple turn-based RPG 'Dark Bestiary' is up on Steam

    If you're a big fan of turn-based combat, looting and creating a character from tons of varied skills then Dark Bestiary is a game you might find quite interesting.

Games: Godot Engine Fund and Commodore 64 on the Internet

Filed under
Gaming
  • FOSS game engine Godot Engine just gained a new Platinum sponsor

    The excellent free and open source game engine Godot Engine just announced that Heroic Labs are now supporting their development as a Platinum level sponsor.

    Going by the Patreon campaign for Godot Engine, that means Heroic Labs are handing over at least $1,500 monthly to help development which is awesome. It's an interesting matchup too, as Heroic Labs are the developers of the open source Nakama (GitHub) a "real-time, competitive, social back-end that helps game developers create compelling multiplayer experiences" according to Heroic and they're now working on getting it working with Godot Engine as well.

  • HEROIC LABS SUPPORTS GODOT DEVELOPMENT

    We are happy to announce that Heroic Labs is now supporting Godot's development as Platinum sponsor! For this occasion, we asked Heroic Labs co-founder Mo Firouz to write some words about the company, why they choose to support Godot and their plans to integrate Nakama with our engine.

    Imagine a world where all music had been written for piano.

    In a piano-only world, we’d never have the guitar solo from Comfortably Numb, or the drum loop from Straight Outta Compton, and the Flight of the Bumblebee would lose its frantic energy.

    Pianos are wonderful but the world’s richer for all the many ways that we can make music.

    At Heroic Labs, we see games development in a similar way. The rich variety of tooling available to games developers has delivered an explosion of creativity over the past decade.

  • Commodore 64 on the Internet | IRC

    The Commodore 64 was my first computer and as such, now holds a special place in my heart and probably forever more, or at least until I lose my mind completely. In all the years I had a C64, I never visited a BBS as I didn’t get that bit of tech until I got my Commodore Amiga 600. Due to the wonders of the Internet, and a global effort to keep these old machines relevant from guys like The 8-Bit Guy, Perifractic Retro Recipes, Retro Man Cave, Dan Wood, LGR and so many others, I was inspired to take the time to make my Commodore 64 more than just a stroll down vintage lane for me. I have seen others make use of it for writing and developing new games and such for it but how could I incorporate it into my life was the question. That answer, IRC, it must do IRC.

    [...]

    I am impressed that I am able to do this much with an unmodified Commodore 64. I am quite impressed that with 64 KiB of RAM, it is still a productive and usable tool. It is quite single purpose but absolutely useful.

    I want to note that the web browser does work in this Contiki OS but not with HTTPS so that is out. It does make requests as you would expect and I think I just may revisit the rest of this on another blathering at some point in time.

    Future plans, I really want to be able to telnet into a Linux machine with the Commodore 64, I have some other hardware and software I want to try out with this machine to see what other greatness can become of it.

Games: EVERSPACE 2, Lethal League, Valve and Dying Light

Filed under
Gaming
  • The huge sounding EVERSPACE 2 from ROCKFISH Games is now live on Kickstarter

    The day is upon on us as the massive new space shooter with deep exploration, EVERSPACE 2, is now live on Kickstarter.

    Following on from the original which supports Linux, as we wrote about before ROCKFISH Games will be continuing to support Linux with this much expanded sequel.

  • Midweek tip - Lethal League is an amusing competitive projectile fighting game available on Linux

    Here's a game that we've never really talked about here but that ends today. The competitive projectile fighting game, Lethal League, is a huge amount of fun. Developed by Team Reptile, it originally released on Steam back in 2014. They actually later released a Linux version much later in the middle of 2015.

    I'm not entirely sure how we missed properly covering such a fantastic game. Seriously, it's a riot! You and three others face off in a simple arena with an anti-gravity ball floating around you need to smack into others. The idea alone is somewhat hilarious and the gameplay is fantastic.

  • Valve are doing their own big charity sale for One Gamer Fund

    Much like Humble are doing with the Humble One Special Day Bundle 2019, Valve have just launched their own charity sale for One Gamer Fund.

    One Gamer Fund is a partnership between seven charities: Games for Change, Take This, Stack up, The AbleGamers Charity, Child's Play, IGDA Foundation and the Global Game Jam. More info about the organisation can be seen on the official site.

  • Dying Light has another update with a new enemy and previously exclusive weapons open to everyone

    Techland have once again updated their fantastic open-world Zombie action game Dying Light, this time with a few new bits for everyone to play with.

    Like the last content update which added in the Silver Hazmat Zombie, Dying Light 1.2 gives us another new enemy with the Gasmask Demolisher. A powerful variant of probably the biggest enemy in the game so if you come across it be sure you're fully stocked up medkits. They're not a common infected type, so they may take a bit of finding. If you head to Old Town, they can be found in more closed-off arena-like areas.

A Beginner’s Guide To Playing Games On Linux, Part 1: Enjoying Your Steam Library

Filed under
Gaming

I’m a Linux advocate, but I’m also a realist. Anyone who tells you it’s possible to play “everything” on Linux simply isn’t telling the truth. Are there literally thousands of Windows-exclusive titles that will run on the majority of Linux distributions without hassle? You bet. Plus there are thousands of native Linux titles.

Yes, you can even play the majority of games from EA’s Origin, Ubisoft’s UPlay and Blizzard’s Battle.net platforms. Typically, you’ll find that games like Destiny 2, Fortnite, Gears 5 and other releases that incorporate certain DRM (Denuvo) and anti-cheat tools (Easy Anti-Cheat) will present the biggest headaches. For now, these are unplayable – although Valve and Codeweavers are working diligently on solutions.

My advice is this: If you’ve considered jumping from Windows to Linux but gaming is holding you back, make the switch and keep your Windows installation (this is called dual-booting). You’ll enjoy spending the majority of your time on a responsive, privacy-respecting operating system that doesn’t slow down over time, never plagues you with unexpected updates or constant nags, and lets you truly personalize every aspect of your desktop.

For those games that just won’t run on Linux? Boot back into Windows. I certainly won’t judge you on that, because sometimes I do the same thing for those games I simply can’t live without.

Ok, now that expectations have been set, let’s start the journey.

Read more

Games: Steam, Athenaeum, Crusader Kings II, Zoria, Skeletal Dance Party

Filed under
Gaming
  • The clever Steam 'Deep Dive' experiment has a big update with a new matching system

    One of the current experiments in Steam Labs is called Deep Dive, which Valve worked with game developer Lars Doucet to create. It's a really cool idea and it got a nice big update recently.

  • Athenaeum, the FOSS game launcher and updater has a big new release

    Athenaeum, which is described as a "libre replacement for Steam" by the developer just recently had a big new release out.

    Okay, so what exactly does it do? It's basically a front-end for Flathub and so all games are installed using Flatpak. Quite a handy application though, a little nicer than using the command-line or browsing the Flathub website directly. It may eventually grow into something bigger but for now it seems to do the basic job of managing FOSS games quite nicely.

  • Paradox are updating Crusader Kings II to bring 64bit support, plus a new Paradox game coming

    After being quiet about it for a while, Paradox are once again updating their rather old strategy game Crusader Kings II.

    The last patch for this 2012 grand strategy game from Paradox Development Studio and Paradox Interactive was back in June and that was quite small. However, it did have a major update only in May with Crusader Kings II: 3.2 Iron Century.

    Now we have a brand new update currently available for Beta testing 3.2.2, which brings full 64bit support for Crusader Kings II. Something important to note is that when the update is live, Paradox will no longer support 32bit for Crusader Kings II. If you own it, you can opt into the open Beta for it on Steam and report issues to help make the Linux version nice and stable.

  • Party-based tactical RPG 'Zoria: Age of Shattering' is launching for Linux this November

    Build a party of strong heroes and deal with all the horrors that await in the fantasy world of Zoria. The Steam page recently went live, it looks good and it's coming to Linux.

    Currently in development by Tiny Trinket Games, who previously released the positively rated Azuran Tales: Trials which did not have Linux support so it's fun to see them do Linux for their brand new game. On Steam it already has system requirements up and they confirmed Linux on Twitter too.

  • Skeletal Dance Party has another big free update coming out for Halloween

    Well this is quite appropriate isn't it? Skeletal Dance Party, an amusing game about raising the dead and dancing is getting a big free update this month for Halloween.

3 command line games for learning Bash the fun way

Filed under
GNU
Gaming

Learning is hard work, and nobody likes work. That means no matter how easy it is to learn Bash, it still might feel like work to you. Unless, of course, you learn through gaming.

You wouldn't think there would be many games out there to teach you how to use a Bash terminal, and you'd be right. Serious PC gamers know that the Fallout series features terminal-based computers in the vaults, which helps normalize the idea of interfacing with a computer through text, but in spite of featuring applications more or less like Alpine or Emacs, playing Fallout doesn't teach you commands or applications you can use in real life. The Fallout series was never ported to Linux directly (although it is playable through Steam's open source Proton. The modern entries into the Wasteland series that served as predecessors to Fallout, however, do target Linux, so if you want to experience in-game terminals, you can play Wasteland 2 and Wasteland 3 on your Linux gaming PC. The Shadowrun series also targets Linux, and it features a lot of terminal-based interactions, although it's admittedly often overshadowed by blazing hot sim sequences.

Read more

Games: Humble One Special Day Bundle, Littlewood and Psyonix

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Humble One Special Day Bundle 2019 has a solid Linux selection

    Humble are once again doing a game bundle in support of SpecialEffect’s One Special Day fundraising event, a really great charity worth supporting and the Linux games in the bundle are a good choice too.

  • The super relaxing building and crafting RPG 'Littlewood' now has a Monster card game

    Not played it yet? Littlewood was inspired by the likes of Animal Crossing, Dark Cloud and some classic bits of Runescape. It could also be compared with Stardew Valley, although it does have a very different look and feel a lot of the basics are the same. Littlewood is one of those reasonably rare super sweet experiences that can help you relax as you just zone out and appreciate the joyful atmosphere of it.

  • Psyonix have announced what is replacing Rocket League loot boxes and it sounds reasonable

    One change I am particularly happy about is Rocket League removing all loot box gambling and Psyonix have now announced it's happening in December along with what will replace it.

    When writing about their original announcement back in August, I suggested they might replace loot boxes with a still randomized system but you would see the contents and an item shop. Guess what? I was right.

    Instead of loot boxes, they will have a Blueprint system. It will be a random drop and possibly have special attributes but you know exactly what it is. There will also be a dedicated rotating item shop to buy items from, with a new Credits premium currency that will be used for basically everything including making items from Blueprints, upgrading to the Premium Rocket Pass and buying from the shop.

Games: Stardock CEO, MegaSphere, Steam, SCS Software and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • No Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation for Linux but Ashes II and future Stardock titles should be

    Good and bad news to share this Tuesday morning. Stardock Entertainment have given an update on the status of porting Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation to Vulkan and Linux.

    It's been a long road! After Stardock CEO, Brad Wardell, opened a forum post on Steam asking to see Linux requests to bring Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation to Linux back in May 2017 we've been waiting to finally see the port. That ends now though, as the latest update has basically said it's not happening.

  • Beautiful sci-fi action platformer MegaSphere just got a massive update, needs a workaround on Linux

    You've played a lot of action platformers before but not many come close to the breathtaking design work going into MegaSphere and it just got a lot bigger in the Anomaly update out now.

    This is the first major update to MegaSphere in a long time, it's an Early Access game so it's still not finished but the level of attention being put into crafting it from AKGames is truly spectacular. The Anomaly update adds in new areas, mechanics, enemies and improvements to game throughout.

  • Monthly Games I've Played In Linux | September 2019
  • New Steam Client Beta up with an updated Steam Linux Runtime and memory leak fixes

    Have you been having issues with Steam recently since the new Library Beta? This latest Beta update should make it a much better experience.

    The newer Library (and Friends UI) are a bit heavier on your PC, as a lot of people noticed. However, you can enable GPU acceleration to make everything quite a bit smoother. That came at a cost though, as there was an unfurtunate memory leak and it sucked away performance from gaming. Valve have made attempts to address these issues in the new Beta update out.

  • SCS Software are doing a Breast Cancer charity event in Euro Truck Simulator 2 and American Truck Simulator

    This is pretty sweet to see. SCS Software are running an event from now until Sunday, October 20 at 23:59 UTC to raise funds for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

  • Valve updates Counter-Strike: Global Offensive for French players to deal with loot boxes

    Rather than doing away with the loot boxes system, Valve are going with whatever loophole they can it seems. They've updated Counter-Strike: Global Offensive just for French players to include an X-ray Scanner.

    It's no secret that many countries are looking into the issues surrounding loot box gambling, something I am happy about because it's a terrible system. Valve also have issues with France, especially considering the recent legal ruling about reselling your digital games.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Mutter & GNOME Shell Hackfest, PyCon Africa 2019 (Recap) and More Python

  • Mutter & GNOME Shell Hackfest

    A couple of weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend the Mutter & GNOME Shell hackfest in Leidschendam.

  • Real Python: PyCon Africa 2019 (Recap)

    PyCon Africa was a wonderful, inspiring, and technically enlightening conference that took place in Accra, Ghana from August 6 to 10, 2019 at the University of Ghana. This conference was the very first pan-African conference for Python developers and was attended by 323 Pythonistas from 26 different countries. Most of the attendees traveled from countries around Africa, and a number of speakers came from the US, the Netherlands, Germany, Brazil, and Italy. Python is becoming more and more adopted all across the globe. In Africa, Python is earning a special place for itself, where it’s used extensively for web development and data science. African businesses are looking for developers with Python skills in these areas, and having a PyCon in Africa provides a foundation to help support African programmers. [...] The day after the main conference was dedicated to sprints! This is where people group up to work on various open source Python projects. I was part of a team that worked on Cookie Cutter and other related projects. I submitted a PR that got merged into the project and I also helped mentor other team members. I highly recommend anyone who has not attended a sprint before to do so! It’s a great way to practice your skills, contribute to an open source project, and meet the developers involved with the project.

  • Tutorial: How to Read Stata Files in Python with Pandas

    We are soon going to practically answer how to open a Stata file in Python? In Python, there are two useful packages called Pyreadstat, and Pandas that enable us to open .dta files. If we are working with Pandas, the read_stata method will help us import a .dta into a Pandas dataframe. Furthermore, the package Pyreadstat, which is dependent on Pandas, will also create a Pandas dataframe from a .dta file.

  • Python Software Foundation: Seeking Developers for Paid Contract Improving pip

    The Python Software Foundation Packaging Working Group is receiving funding to work on the design, implementation, and rollout of pip's next-generation dependency resolver. (We'll be able to publicly name the funders later this month and in early December.) pip is the official package installer for Python. pip aims to make it easy for the millions of people who use Python to download and install Python libraries and applications (open source and closed source, source and binary, globally and within isolated virtual environments). It's a foundational component of the Python ecosystem and broader computer software and technology landscape. This project aims to complete the design, implementation, and rollout of pip's next-generation dependency resolver. This will lower the barriers to installing Python software, empowering users to get a version of a package that works. It will also lower the barriers to distributing Python software, empowering developers to make their work available in an easily reusable form. Because of the size of the project, funding has been allocated to secure two contractors, a senior developer and an intermediate developer, to work on development, testing and building test infrastructure, code review, bug triage, and assisting in the rollout of necessary features.

  • Rename all files in a directory to the md5 hash

Database of 200+ smartphones that can run Linux (unofficially)

The vast majority of smartphones in the world ship with some version of Google’s Android operating system. And most of them are only supported by their manufacturers for a few years. Have a phone that’s 3-4 years old? Then you’re probably not getting any Android updates anymore. No more security patches. No new features. Of course, some folks can run custom ROMs such as LineageOS, which lets you install updates indefinitely… but want to break out of Android altogether? There are a handful of other GNU/Linux-based operating systems including Ubuntu Touch, postmarketOS, and Maemo Leste that are designed to, among other things, help give your phone a longer lifespan. One tricky thing can be figuring out which phones are supported. That’s where a new Can My Phone Run Linux database from TuxPhones comes in. Read more

Linux driver patches indicate AMD is readying integer scaling

Both Intel and Nvidia have released graphics driver updates to enable integer scaling options this year. Intel made a big song and dance out of the development process with Tweets and blog updates trailing the graphics driver feature. Then integer scaling became available for Intel Gen11 graphics users after a September driver update. Nvidia actually pipped Intel to the post by implementing integer scaling (for Turing GPUs) in its Gamescom driver release in August - it snuck in the update without much fanfare as it simultaneously boosted a number of AAA games performance and added some new image sharpening features. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Servers: Boston Children’s Hospital, IBM and SUSE in High-Performance Computing (HPC)

  • How Boston Children’s Hospital Augments Doctors Cognition with Red Hat OpenShift

    Software can be an enabler for healers. At Red Hat, we’ve seen this first hand from customers like Boston Children’s Hospital. That venerable infirmary is using Red Hat OpenShift and Linux containers to enhance their medical capabilities, and to augment their doctors cognitive capacity.

  • Entry Server Bang For The Buck, IBM i Versus Red Hat Linux

    In last week’s issue, we did a competitive analysis of the entry, single-socket Power S914 machines running IBM i against Dell PowerEdge servers using various Intel Xeon processors as well as an AMD Epyc chip running a Windows Server and SQL Server stack from Microsoft. This week, and particularly in the wake of IBM’s recent acquisition of Red Hat, we are looking at how entry IBM i platforms rate in terms of cost and performance against X86 machines running a Linux stack and an appropriate open source relational database that has enterprise support. Just as a recap from last week’s story, the IBM i matchup against Windows Server systems were encouraging in that very small configurations of the Power Systems machine running IBM i were less expensive per unit of online transaction processing performance as well as per user. However, on slightly larger configurations of single socket machines, thanks mostly to the very high cost per core of the IBM i operating system and its integrated middleware and database as you move from the P05 to P10 software tiers on the Power S914, the capital outlay can get very large at list price for the Power iron, and the software gets very pricey, too. The only thing that keeps the IBM i platform in the running is the substantially higher performance per core that the Power9 chip offers on machines with four, six, or eight cores. Such processors are fairly modest by 2019 standards, by the way, when a high-end chip has 24, 28, 32, or now 64 cores, and even mainstream ones have 12, 16, or 18 cores. If you want to see the rationale of the hardware configurations that we ginned up for the comparisons, we suggest that you review the story from last week. Suffice it to say, we tried to get machines with roughly the same core counts and configuration across the Power and X86 machines, and generally, the X86 cores for these classes of single socket servers do a lot less work.

  • Rise of the Chameleon – SUSE at SC19

    The impact of High-Performance Computing (HPC) goes beyond traditional research boundaries to enhance our daily lives.  SC19 is the international conference for High Performance Computing, networking, storage and analysis taking place in Denver November 17-22.  SUSE will once again have a strong presence at SC19 – and if you are attending we would love to talk to you!  Our SUSE booth (#1917) will include our popular Partner Theater as well as a VR light saber game with a Star Wars themed backdrop.  We will showcase SUSE’s HPC core solutions (OS, tools and Services) as well as AI/ML, Storage and Cloud open source products.  Plus, during the gala opening reception we will premier our new mini-movie “Sam the IT Manager in The Way of the Chameleon: The Quest for HPC” which you don’t want to miss (we’ll provide the popcorn)!