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Gaming

Tizen Games

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Linux
Gaming
  • Top 20 Most Popular Tizen Apps and Games in 2016

    Tizen smartphones certainly gained further in popularity during 2016. We had the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3 models and we are promised more to be released during 2017. During the course of last year, we kept you updated with the Top apps/games that were being downloaded from the Tizen Store, and today we have the Tp 20 most popular Tizen apps and Games in the whole of 2016.

  • Smartphone Game: Genius Test, a good mind test game released in Tizen Store

    Hi guys, many puzzles game released have been released in the Tizen Store. But, a different type of puzzle game in mind testing game is now available. The game named Genius Test has been added by Amjad Chaudhry and copyright of I Need Play.

  • Smartphone Game: Ramble Race 2, ride on your Motorcycle

    Rample Race 2 is a game where you have to drive on a road without crashing. There are different motorcycles that you can buy using virtual money, which you collect by doing various things on the levels.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Steam Adds XBox Controller Rumble and EMiO PlayStation 4 "Elite" Gamepad Support

    It looks to us like Valve's engineers have decided to make a New Year's resolution to add great improvements to the Steam Client, and they're now shipping two more Beta versions for early adopters.

    Among the improvements added since our last report, we can notice that there's now XBox controller rumble support, a new option called "Turn Off Controller" that lets users shut down both the PlayStation 4 Bluetooth controller and the Sony wireless receiver that ships with it, and an updated Web control to Chromium 56.0.2924.10.

  • Observer, a new horror from the 'Layers of Fear' developer and publisher Aspyr Media announced

    It's being developed with Unreal Engine 4, so hopefully with Aspyr Media helping out, Bloober Team should be able to get a polished Linux version sorted.

  • [Older] Linux Arcade System

    How about turning your Linux system into an arcade system? Making your computer into an arcade system can make for some interesting fun. Actual arcade games that everyone had to pump quarters into all day and get nowhere, you can now do it at home without the need for quarters.

  • Discord announce their Linux client is now officially supported and out of beta

    Discord, the insanely popular chat and VOIP client primarily aimed at gamers is now officially supported on Linux and out of beta.

  • Gearend, a cute 2D non-linear exploration game built on Linux

    I was sent in Gearend [Official Site] by a reader, as it not only looks like a pretty good 2D exploration game, but it's also developed on Linux.

  • Wine-Staging 2.0 RC4 Improves FlipToGDISurface DirectDraw Handling, Adds Fixes

    It was bound to happen sooner or later, especially now that Wine 2.0 got its fourth Release Candidate (RC), and you can now test drive one of the last development release of Wine-Staging 2.0.

    The Wine Staging team have announced the availability of the Wine-Staging 2.0 RC4, based on Wine 2.0 RC4, but bringing a bunch of various improvements and bug fixes that haven't yet landed in the mainline Wine branch. Among these, we can mention better handling of FlipToGDISurface DDraw.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Lars Doucet, a game developer, is asking Valve to open source the Steam Controller software

    Lars Doucet, developer of Defender's Quest has written up a reddit post request Valve to open source the Steam Controller software.

    I have to say, I do fully agree with Lars as it would be pretty awesome. It depends on how tied it all is to Steam directly though, Valve may not have had any plans to do this.

  • Microsoft Confirms Scalebound is Cancelled

    We’ve learned of a new rumor pointing to Platinum Games’ Xbox One and PC action RPG Scalebound experiencing further development woes, and possibly even getting canned.

    The new rumor (via Kotaku) is citing “several sources” close to the project saying the game is stuck in development hell, and might be cancelled. When they reached out to Microsoft, they said, “We’ll have more to share on Scalebound soon.”

  • Last day to submit games to our Linux GOTY awards

    I decided to extend the submission time for our GOTY awards by one day just to give it a bit more exposure to gather a good list.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics, and Games/High-End PCs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Linux Kernels 4.8.16 and 4.4.40 LTS Bring Btrfs and CIFS Fixes, Updated Drivers

    Two new Linux kernel releases arrived this past weekend, for the Linux 4.8 and long-term supported Linux 4.4 series, sporting pretty much the same improvements and bug fixes.

    Linux kernels 4.8.16 and 4.4.40 LTS are out, as announced by renowned kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, and they're here three weeks after the release of the previous maintenance updates, namely Linux 4.8.15 and Linux 4.4.39 LTS, due to the obvious Christmas and New Year's holidays.

  • Mesa Patches For Bringing Intel Haswell To OpenGL 4.2

    Igalia developers have been doing a lot of work this past week from seeing their FP64 Haswell patches merged, issuing new Ivy Bridge FP64 patches for testing, Float64 support for the Intel Vulkan driver, and related work. The newest from Juan Suarez Romero on behalf of Igalian developers are the 11 patches needed for taking Intel's Mesa driver for Haswell to the OpenGL 4.2 milestone.

  • It's Official: Sid Meier’s Civilization VI Is Coming to Linux and SteamOS, Soon

    Aspyr Media have officially announced today, January 9, 2017, the upcoming availability of the Sid Meier’s Civilization VI turn-based 4X video game for the Linux and SteamOS platforms.

    Developed by Firaxis Games and published by 2K Games, Sid Meier’s Civilization VI launched for the Windows and Macintosh operating systems last year on the 21st of October. It already won the "Best Strategy Game" award during the The Game Awards 2016 annual awards ceremony.

  • Aspyr Media Officially Confirms Bringing Civilization VI To Linux
  • RadeonSI Gamers: What Linux Games Still Don't Work For You?

    Valve appears to be ramping up their open-source AMD Linux graphics driver work, but they are looking for more Linux games that currently don't work atop the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver.

  • Talos Secure POWER8 Linux Workstation With Fully Open Source Firmware

    Raptor Engineering is working and crowdfunding a high-end power8 based desktop computer with zero proprietary firmware blobs in the Talos Secure Workstation. Traditionally IBM, Oracle(Sun), Intel/AMD and others ruled this market segment. But now there is competition to Intel for a desktop computer.

  • The POWER8 Libre System Looks Set To Fail, Now There's An AMD Libre System Effort

    It doesn't look like the Talos Secure Workstation will see the light of day with it's crowdfunding campaign ending this week and it's coming up more than three million dollars short of its financing goal. Now there's another effort to offer a libre system but using off-the-shelf x86 hardware.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

State of Android Gaming 2017

Filed under
Android
Gaming

This past year may go down as a banner year for Android gaming. We saw some big tech advancements in virtual reality and augmented reality, a great mix of outstanding games from indie developers and established franchises, and we're looking forward to more of that good stuff in 2017.

Here's what I saw as the trends and highlights from 2016, and what I'm looking forward to most in the new year.

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Wine and CrossOver

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Exclusive: Civilization VI now fully confirmed to be coming for SteamOS & Linux and soon too

    It’s been a bit of a ride, but we now have it confirmed for sure that Civilization VI [Steam] is coming to Linux, and the release isn’t far off. We are able to confirm this with permission before the official announcement from Aspyr Media that is due later today.

    I cannot confirm to you the actual release date, but I can confirm if everything goes as planned that you won’t be kept waiting much longer.

  • False and misleading: ACCC Blasts Online Games platform Valve with $3 million fine

    Late last year the Australian Federal Court ordered Valve Corporation (Valve) to pay penalties totaling $3 million for breaching the Australian Consumer Law.

    This followed an earlier finding in March 2016, that Valve had made false or misleading representations to consumers in relation to its online gaming platform, Steam. “The Court held that the terms and conditions in the Steam subscriber agreements, and Steam’s refund policies, included false or misleading representations about consumers’ rights to obtain a refund for games if they were not of acceptable quality.”

  • XCOM: Enemy Unknown should now work properly with radeonsi

    If you had tried playing XCOM: Enemy Unknown [Steam] (not to be confused with XCOM 2) on radeonsi and had it crash constantly, the good news is that this should now be fixed as of Mesa 13.0.3.

  • Mesa patched to help render The Witcher 2 correctly on radeonsi

    Mesa has another patch that will be interesting for Linux gamers. This is actually a two-part fix as it was re-worked. The Witcher 2 [Steam, GOG] should have a lot less black flickering with this latest patch.

Valve Does a 180: Valve Steam on Linux Ubuntu a Go

Filed under
Gaming
Ubuntu

He did a good job of convincing me that Valve is in the process of developing its products to run natively in Linux…but Valve wouldn’t cop to it. It only admitted it was playing around with Linux. Nothing was official. Interestingly, after the notorious Michael Larabel interview and visit, Valve reps actually insisted in that there was no serious Linux project at all with GamesIndustry.biz, anyway.

Read more

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