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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Moving steam's .local folder deletes all user files on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Failing to add a check for an empty variable has left some Steam users on Linux running a recursive delete of their entire filesystem with user privileges.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Unreal Engine 4 Linux Tests With AMD & NVIDIA Graphics Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

This week there was a 22-way graphics card test of Metro Redux on Linux using GeForce and Radeon hardware with the latest AMD and NVIDIA proprietary drivers. Today the newest Linux gaming test candidate to look at is the AMD/NVIDIA Linux performance with the latest Unreal Engine 4 demos. In this article is a look at the UE4 Linux performance on AMD and NVIDIA graphics hardware running with Ubuntu.

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SteamOS Arrives with New NVIDIA and AMD Drivers and Better 32-bit App Performance

Filed under
Debian
Gaming

Valve has just released a new update for the stable branch of SteamOS and they've updated a ton of important packages, including the proprietary drivers and the Linux kernel.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Automated Unreal Engine 4 Benchmarks For Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

The Steam Linux game benchmarking advancement that was talked about in the earlier article is help from Valve in being able to gain rights from game publishers to redistribute OpenGL game traces to use as benchmarks for newer AAA Linux games that otherwise don't support automated benchmarking. That article though went over some of the downsides in benchmarking Linux games with OpenGL traces. The Metro Redux testing advancement though was something that coincidentally also got finished up this past week.

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22-Way AMD+NVIDIA Graphics Card Tests With Metro Redux On Steam For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming

A few days back I wrote about being able to finally get the Metro Redux game benchmarks running in an automated manner under Linux to the point that we're now able to test it with the Phoronix Test Suite. With Metro 2033 Redux and Metro Last Light Redux now running well for our testing purposes, I've carried out performance tests of these two games with twenty-two AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards on Linux. Besides looking at the normal FPS result there's also frame latency metrics, power consumption data for each of these graphics cards, performance-per-Watt metrics, and GPU thermal results. If you're wondering what graphics card works best for your needs for OpenGL 4.x Linux gaming, here's an interesting look with the Metro Redux titles that premiered on Steam for Linux back in December.

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GOG.com Ditches Password-Protected Archives for the Sake of Linux Users

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

The Linux community has pressured the GOG developers to remove the password-protected archives that were present in a number of their games, making the contents of those titles accessible to all the platforms.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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