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Gaming

Games: BATIM, Nintendo Switch, Make Sail

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Gaming

Games: Wine 3.7 and Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Leap Motion details low-cost AR headset, plans to go open source

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Hardware
OSS
Gaming

“We believe that the fundamental limit in technology is not its size or its cost or its speed,” writes Leap Motion, “but how we interact with it.”

This statement demonstrates the fresh perspective that companies like Leap Motion have been bringing to the commercial 3D tech industry. In fact, in the past year or two, we’ve started to feel a sea change as even the most entrenched, traditional manufacturers in the commercial 3D space have taken a hard turn toward simplicity of operation and sheer usability.

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How I designed a game with Scratch

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Development
Gaming

I decided to create a game using the Scratch programming language. Targeted at kids who want to learn programming, Scratch is designed to be easy and visual.

I am a good programmer, and I also do game development with other platforms, but what fascinates me about Scratch is that it is easy to get started with and I didn't need to remember too much to use the platform. This was a plus because I had limited time to spend getting up to speed on other platforms.

A project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab, the coding system and player for Scratch is available as open source on GitHub, although Scratch is most often used via its browser-based online version. The latter also comes with cloud storage and a website to host, play, comment, and favorite projects. All published projects are automatically released under a CC-BY-SA 3.0 license, so as a Scratcher, you experience the open source concept first-hand. I even used code from another Scratch project for the text display in my game.

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Games: Unigine, ARMA, DASH, GOG, Chronicon, SMACH OS

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Gaming
  • Unigine 2.7 Continues With Graphics Improvements, Updated Editor & SDK Updates

    The visually stunning and technically advanced Unigine 2 engine that is well supported on Linux is out with a new release, Unigine 2.7. Unigine 2.7 rolls out with updated SDK offerings of Unigine 2 Entertainment, Unigine 2 Engineering, and Unigine 2 Sim depending upon your commercial needs.

    While Unigine 2 still isn't used by many games out there, it appears their simulation/professional offerings remain of relevance to many organizations and they continue doing a dandy job at supporting Linux. At the very least, their engine remains very stunning and a beauty to look at the rendered screenshots.

  • Something for the weekend: Play ARMA 3 & Day of Infamy for free, many games on sale

    If you thought you were going to be bored this weekend, think again. ARMA 3 and Day of Infamy are both having a free weekend so you can try before you buy and many games are on sale.

    To pre-empt questions about ARMA 3: It doesn't advertise it, but it has an "experimental" Linux version on Steam ported by Virtual Programming and it's not bad. Just download, install, play.

    Both games are on sale as well, so if you decide you like either of them, you can pick them up cheap!

  • Urban Pirate developer's next game DASH will support Linux

    Baby Duka, the developer and artist behind anarchist survival sim Urban Pirate [itch.io, Steam], streams himself developing his next title, a make-and-share-your-own-levels platformer DASH (indiedb.com), every Wednesday (8pm GMT) and Saturday (6pm GMT) (twitch.tv/BabyDuka). I liked Urban Pirate a lot with it's distinctive art style and gameplay, and during one stream I stopped by and asked whether DASH also would support Linux, which he confirmed it would.

  • We’ve teamed up with GOG for the Ubuntu 18.04 release, we have some keys to give away

    Ubuntu 18.04 is now officially released, so to mark this occasion we’ve teamed up with DRM free game store GOG for a sale and to throw some free games your way.

  • 2D action RPG Chronicon has just added official Linux support

    Chronicon [Official Site], a pretty sweet looking 2D action RPG just had a major update which included an officially supported Linux version. Note: Copy personally purchased.

    As promised by the developer last month, the latest big patch landed yesterday, the "Major Content Update #6" included: A Linux version, hardcore mode, an overhaul of ultimate skills, a quest tracker, quest log improvements, over 50 new sound effects and improved audio quality, improved performance and much more. You can see see the announcement about it here.

  • You can now pre-order the SMACH Z gaming handheld

    Remember the SMACH Z? [Official Site] The portable Ryzen-powered gaming handheld that comes with either their Linux-based SMACH OS or Windows 10, well it's now up for pre-order. Selecting a SMACH Z unit with Windows 10 does add around £80.10 to the cost, so it will be interesting to see how many opt for the Linux unit.

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

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Gaming

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date.

Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution.

And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices.

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Games: GOG, Cities: Skylines - Parklife and More

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Gaming
  • Comedy adventure game HIVESWAP: Act 1 is now on GOG

    For those who love comedy adventure games, you might want to take a look at HIVESWAP: Act 1 as it's now on GOG.

  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife now has a very short gameplay teaser

    Cities: Skylines - Parklife, the new expansion coming next month now has a rather short gameplay teaser.

    For those who didn't see the previous announcement, Parklife will further expand the city-builder from developer Colossal Order and publisher Paradox Interactive to include: amusement parks, nature reserves, city parks and zoos, and giving new life to your empty land with custom parks and gardens.

  • GOG now have the Linux version of retro-inspired FPS STRAFE: Millennium Edition

    For those of you GOG fans itching for some FPS action, you might want to check out STRAFE: Millennium Edition as GOG now have the Linux build too. Really good to see GOG add some many Linux builds lately, really pleasing to see!

    Naturally, the GOG build comes with the latest version of the game including a few of the Linux issues that came up being squashed. It's also 64bit, so no lib hunting required.

Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 2700X With Rise of The Tomb Raider On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Here are our latest Linux gaming benchmarks comparing the Intel Core i7 8700K to the newly-released Ryzen 7 2700X. The focus in this article is on the Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux port released last week by Feral Interactive and powered by Vulkan.

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Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Puzzle With Your Friends is now available

    As you might imagine, Puzzle With Your Friends allows you to build a series of puzzles by either yourself or cooperatively with a friend. It’s a casual sort of game, without much in the way of pressure or even points to worry about. Building the puzzle at your own pace is all that matters.

  • Pillars of Eternity II will be getting three post-launch content packs

    Pillars of Eternity II [Official Site] is the sequel to Obsidian’s successful RPG title and is a direct continuation of the original game’s story. Players resume the role of the Watcher and will be traveling to the Deadfire Archipelago where there’s pirates and hazards aplenty. I’m looking forward to seeing how this one shapes up as I generally enjoyed the first game, especially after some of the bigger irritations were dealt with by updates.

  • Get ready to face the Chaos Trials as 'Wizard of Legend' releases May 15th with Linux support

    Wizard of Legend [Official Site], the fast-paced dungeon crawler with rogue-like elements is going to officially release on May 15th with Linux support.

    The game was funded on Kickstarter, way back in July of 2016 with around $72K secured. It's been a little while since we followed it, but early impressions were good and it had a Linux demo build even back then.

  • A fresh Steam Beta Client finally fixes Unreal Engine screenshots on Linux

    Nothing huge here, but it's nice that Valve have finally fixed another issue that plagued Linux users for some time.

    For those who don't know, Steam has a built-in screenshot tool (Hit F12 while in-game) and you can then upload them to Steam directly for others to see. The problem is that UE4 games would just give a completely black shot and it's been a bug since as far back as 2014 (possibly even earlier) so it's good to see it squashed.

  • Space God is an incredibly colourful top-down shooter now on Linux

    We're certainly not short on top-down shooters, but Unreal Engine powered Space God is worth a look for sure.

  • Midnight Ultra, a colourful retro-inspired FPS is now on Linux

    Inspired by DOOM, Quake, and action games from a time long gone, Midnight Ultra [Official Site] is a very colourful FPS that just added Linux support.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.