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Gaming

Wine 3.11 Released and Turok Remastered Roars on to Linux

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.11 is now available.

  • Wine 3.11 Brings Debugging Support For WoW64 Processes, Better Reporting Of HT CPUs

    Wine 3.11 is now available as the newest bi-weekly development release of this software for running Windows programs/games/applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    With Wine 3.11 there is better debugger support for WoW64 (Windows 32-bit on Windows 64-bit) processes, support for SHA256/SHA384 hashes inside ECDSA signatures, better reporting of virtual CPU cores via Hyper Threading / SMT, improvements to the standard Task Dialog, and a total of 12 known bug fixes.

  • Turok Remastered Roars on to Linux

    A remastered version of ‘Turok: Dinosaur Hunter’ has arrived on Linux.

    The game first found fame on the Nintendo 64 back way back in 1997, where it helped define the fledgling first-person shooter genre for an entire generation of gamers.

    Now a high-definition, remastered port is available to play on Linux, having stomped its way on to the Xbox One in May,

Games and DXVK

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Gaming

Games: Steam Summer Sale, GNU/Linux Version of Turok, GNU FreeDink

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Gaming
  • Steam Summer Sale is up, free game from Humble Store & Fanatical sale too

    There's quite a lot of sales and stuff going on right now, so I'm going to cram some into one article to give you an extra scoop with sprinkles and all.

    Firstly, head on over to Humble Store to grab a free copy of Shadowrun Returns Deluxe. Note: You do need to be subscribed to their newsletter to get it and it's only going on for 48 hours.

  • The Linux version of Turok has left beta, available to everyone

    Turok, the revamp of the 1997 shooter arrived in Beta for Linux back in May and now it's officially out.

  • GNU FreeDink - One Of The Few Fully Free Software Games - Now Runs On The Web

    When it comes to obscure projects under the official GNU Project umbrella, GNU FreeDink is one of them as being a free software game whose lineage traces back to the Dink Smallwood title from the late 90's. Nearly twenty years after the game's original release, the latest GNU FreeDink release is now available that allows it to be played within web-browsers.

    GNU FreeDink is the GNU maintained version of the Dink Smallwood game based upon its source release and then with any and all proprietary assets (like sounds) replaced to make it completely free software, with many otherwise "open-source" games still relying upon non-libre licensed in-game assets.

Games: XENONAUTS 2, Make Sail and More

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Gaming

Games: BATTLETECH, Xenosis: Alien Infection, League of Legends

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Gaming
  • Harebrained Schemes making 'good progress' on the Linux version of BATTLETECH

    While the Linux version of BATTLETECH [Official Site] sadly didn't release with the latest patch, the developer did give it a clear mention.

  • Top-down sci-fi adventure 'Xenosis: Alien Infection' has been fully funded

    As a huge fan of Xenosis: Alien Infection, the top-down survival adventure game from NerdRage Studios, I'm really happy to see it get funded.

    With around 15 hours left on the Fig campaign, they're sitting pretty at 148% funded with around $37K. That's not bad at all and while it doesn't look like they will hit any interesting stretch-goals, the game itself is great anyway. Check out their latest sneak-peak:

  • Riot changes stance on anti-cheat tech, some Linux users will be able to play League again

    For League of Legends players on Linux, using GPU pass-through technology means they no longer have to say goodbye to Summoner's Rift.

    Last week Riot Games implemented new anti-cheat technology for the game. This targets all instances of virtualization, or software that acts as if it's hardware, in an attempt to stop users from ruining the game experience for others. Through virtualization, players can create accounts run by bots. This generally results in a ruined experience for anyone in a game with such an account due to the bots playing worse than a human teammate would. Unfortunately for some, the anti-cheat technology also inadvertently locks out users on Linux and other open-source software, like Wine.

A look at Lutris – Open Gaming Platform for GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Lutris is quite the handy application I’ve discovered, that helps with organization and installation of games on GNU/Linux, even if they come from multiple sources. One of the project's goals is to support any game that runs on Linux regardless of whether it runs natively, through Wine, or other means.

The main appeal of Lutris is that it provides an interface to manage all games installed on the machine regardless of source. While it is necessary to integrate the games in the application first, doing so is not super complicated. You may add local games right away by selecting them from the local system or visit the Lutris website to add games this way.

Lutris simplifies nearly everything. Users can visit the list of support games on the Lutris website, choose to download and install the game (Note: If its a game that must be bought, you must own it first.)

The website lists supported games and where you can acquire or download them. You can use filters on the site to display only free games, games of a genre, or use the built-in search to find games of interest quickly using it.

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Games Leftovers

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Gaming

11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018 and Fortnite Coming to Android

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Android
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • 11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018

    Gaming on Linux scene is improving each year with better hardware support and increasing support from game developers. Apart from established distros like Ubuntu and Arch Linux, gamers are using Linux gaming distros like Steam OS to get a better experience. The other popular gaming operating systems are Sparky Linux – Gameover edition, Ubuntu GamePack, Lakka Linux, etc.

    Apart from many general-purpose Linux distributions, there exists a crop of distros for specific purposes. Gaming Linux distros too belong to one such category. These distros are specifically built to address your gaming needs, thanks to better hardware support and tons of preinstalled tools.

  • Fortnite: After Nitendo Switch, Android Is The Next Stop

    While the E3 concluded with lots of surprises and striking gaming news, Nitendo came up with its own pandora box. In its E3 presentation, Nitendo released Fortnite version for Switch which can be downloaded through Nitendo eShop.

    It is now absolutely clear that next stop of Epic Games Fortnite would be Android Devices. According to the Fortnite blog, developers are very rigid on summer release of its Android version. In the month of March, Fortnite revealed its iOS version adding to the list of platforms including Xbox One, PS4, PC, iOS and now Nitendo Switch.

Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

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Gaming
  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users

    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots.

    Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.

  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base

    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.

  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support

    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.

  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux

    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta.

    I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

Total War: WARHAMMER

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.