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Gaming

Games: Tales of Maj'Eyal, Stardew Valley, Unforeseen Incidents, Albion Online, Super Hyperactive Ninja

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Gaming

Software and Games Leftovers

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Software
Gaming
  • How to speak Linux [Ed: she actually means GNU]

    I didn’t even stop to imagine that people pronounced Linux commands differently until many years ago when I heard a co-worker use the word “vie” (as in "The teams will vie for the title") for what I’d always pronounced “vee I.” It was a moment I’ll never forget.

  • Ksnip And Flameshot: Qt5 Shutter Screenshot Tool Alternatives

    Shutter is a great application for taking screenshots in Linux, but it has only received bug fixes for years. The application continues to use Gtk+ 2 and doesn't seem to be getting anywhere as far as Gtk+ 3 is concerned.

    Furthermore, the Shutter image editor (which allows adding text, annotations, etc.) now requires installing old libraries to get it to work in recent Linux distributions.

    This article presents 2 Shutter alternatives for taking screenshots on Linux desktops, that are actively developed: Ksnip and Flameshot. Both applications use Qt 5.

    As a side note, I considered the following features to be required in order to compete with Shutter: the ability to upload an image directly from the screenshot tool to some image host, and support for drawing / annotations.

  • Will ‘Htop’ Replace Default ‘Top’ Monitoring Tool in Linux?

    top is a traditional command-line tool for monitoring real-time processes in a Unix/Linux systems, it’s comes preinstalled on most if not all Linux distributions and shows a useful summary of system information including uptime, total number of processes (and number of: running, sleeping, stopped and zombie processes), CPU and RAM usage, and a list of processes or threads currently being managed by the kernel.

  • Cockpit 168

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 168.

  • FOSS game community slump and question about getting images in palepeli

    There is a thread in freegamedev.net which I have been following for the past few weeks.

    In the back-and-forth argument, there I believe most of the arguments shared were somewhat wrong.

    While we have AAA projects like 0ad and others, the mainstay of our games should be ones which doesn’t need any high-quality textures and still does the work.

    I have been looking at a Let’s play playlist of an indie gem called ‘Dead in Vinland’

  • Release GCompris 0.91

    Here is GCompris 0.91, a new bugfix release to correct some issues in previous version and improve a few things.

    Every GNU/Linux distribution shipping 0.90 should update to 0.91.

Games: Fibrillation HD, Xenosis: Alien Infection, Project Zomboid, Interactive Fiction

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Gaming
  • Philosophical and mystical horror 'Fibrillation HD' is now on Linux

    Originally released for Windows back in April last year, Linux support officially arrived yesterday. It turns out, a Linux version was requested by a GOL reader way back in October last year. The developer said at that point "Not in the near future, unfortunately." and then suddenly it's here. Always nice to see the unexpected.

  • Xenosis: Alien Infection a retro-inspired, top-down sci-fi adventure is now live on Fig

    Xenosis: Alien Infection [Official Site] is a top-down sci-fi adventure with horror and survival elements that's really coming together nicely. It will fully support Linux and it's now live on Fig.

    I've been speaking with the developer on and off over the last couple months, as they also gave me access to an early build of the game. I do have to say I'm massively impressed by it already! It oozes an incredible atmosphere out of every hole, already performs well and the developer has been quick to fix issues I notified them about. In terms of issues, there's really not many.

  • Vehicles in survival game Project Zomboid are almost ready for the stable build

    The Indie Stone are a few steps closer to getting vehicles into the stable build of survival game Project Zomboid [Official Site], which should make the game pretty damn interesting.

  • Write and Play Interactive Fiction with Open Source Software

    Interactive fiction is a form of computer game which shares many traits with fiction in book form, role-playing games and puzzle-solving. It’s one of the oldest forms of computer games.

    Interactive fiction is a somewhat nebulous phrase. It can refer to text adventures where the player uses text input to control the game, and the game state is relayed with text output. They are known as text adventures. Crowther & Woods invented this form of games in the 1960s when they designed the famous Colossal Cave Adventure, which was available on many mainframe computer systems. They were massively popular when computers were limited to displaying text. Mobile phones offered a resurgence to the genre, given they consume little resources.

Games: Spartan Fist, Wizard of Legend, Myst 25th Anniversary Collection, Wine 3.0.1 and More

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Proprietary Software on Linux

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Android
Linux
Gaming

Games Leftovers

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Gaming

Games: Hyperspace Dogfights, Leisure Suit Larry, Phoenix Point

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Wine 3.0.1 and Various Games

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Gaming

Games: Smoke and Sacrifice and Pillars of Eternity II

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Gaming

Games: Steam, Hyper Sentinel, Rocket League

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.