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Gaming

Games: Starship Theory, Unreal Engine, Unity 2017, and Steam Refunds

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Gaming
  • Starship Theory just launched a Linux version, developer looking for feedback

    Starship Theory [Steam], a ship building survival game that resembles FTL a little in style is now on Linux, it's currently unsupported as the developer seeks feedback.

  • Unreal Engine 4.17 Preview 1 Ships

    Epic Games has released the first public preview of the upcoming Unreal Engine 4.17 game engine upgrade.

  • Unity 2017 Game Engine Released [Ed: warning is due; it's Microsoft Mono inside.]

    Unity Tech has made available their first updated game engine released under the Unity 2017 branding as part of their new versioning scheme.

  • How One Game Developer Views Steam's Refund Policy As A Boon In The Face Of Over $4 Million In Refunds

    It's been a little over a year since the Steam platform finally rolled out a true refund program for digital game purchases, with Microsoft quickly following suit. While gamers rejoiced at the news that every game purchase wasn't some form of a gamble, game developers reacted in a range generally between being nonplussed to vocally angry or fearful. The overall concern was that this move to shift the balance of Steam's supportive stance towards the consumer and away from the game developer would negatively impact the bottom line of developers now faced with a negative column in their sales metrics.

Games: DOSBox, Dark Forces, Dungeon Kingdom, Geocore, Terroir and More

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Gaming

Games: Unity, Pathfinder: Kingmaker, Golf for Workgroups and More

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Gaming

Games: Latest SteamOS Beta, Games That Come to GNU/Linux, and Wine 2.12

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Gaming

NVIDIA OpenGL vs. Vulkan CPU Core Scaling For Linux Gaming

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

At the end of June I posted some Vulkan vs. OpenGL Linux Game CPU Core Scaling using RADV/RadeonSI with a Polaris graphics card. At that time I also carried out some NVIDIA CPU core scaling results in a Vulkan vs. OpenGL manner, but simply forgot to post those numbers until now.

Due to being preoccupied with other benchmarks, I forgot to post those NVIDIA OpenGL vs. Vulkan CPU core scaling results, but here are those comparison numbers now.

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Games and Software: Next Up Hero, GStreamer, Corebird, and Pitivi

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Software
Gaming
  • Next Up Hero announced by Aspyr Media and Digital Continue, will support Linux

    Next Up Hero [Steam, Official Site] is a new arcade action-adventure being developed by Digital Continue and it's being published by Aspyr Media.

  • GStreamer Could Be The First Multimedia Framework Supporting RTSP 2.0

    Patches are pending for GStreamer that provide the first public client and server implementation of the RTSP 2.0 protocol, Real Time Streaming Protocol 2.0.

    Real Time Streaming Protocol 2.0 was firmed up last year as the replacement to RTSP 1.0 that does break backwards compatibility. To date the protocol authors know of no other implementation of the RTSP 2.0 so this makes GStreamer the first with a working client and server, albeit not yet merged to Git.

  • Linux Twitter App Corebird v1.5.1 Released

    Avid user of Linux Twitter client Corebird? Well, you may want to know that a new release is available to download. But before you get too excited about finding new features I should point at the latest release comes with stability improvements and nothing else.

  • Pitivi: Keyframes for transformation properties

    With a bit more than a month into the GSOC coding time, my project is almost complete. As a reminder, I was working on implementing a keyframe curve for the transformation properties (which control the positioning and size of a clip) in Pitivi.

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Games: Dawn of War III, Steam Growth, Move or Die

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Gaming

Games: The Witcher 3, Galimulator, and Rocket League

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Gaming

Games: The Witcher 3, Itch, and More

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux, Docker Gain in Rented Space

LibreOffice Help From FSF, Mike Saunders

  • New FSF membership benefit: LibreOffice certification
    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced that the opportunity to apply for LibreOffice certification for migrations and trainings is now available to FSF Associate Members. LibreOffice is a free software project of The Document Foundation (TDF), a non-profit based in Germany. An office suite, LibreOffice encompasses word processing, and programs for the creation and editing of spreadsheets, slideshows, databases, diagrams and drawings, and mathematical formulae. It uses the ISO standard OpenDocument file format (ODF).
  • Marketing activities so far in 2017: Mike Saunders
    Thanks to donations to The Document Foundation, along with valued contributions from our community, we maintain a small team working on various aspects of LibreOffice including documentation, user interface design, quality assurance, release engineering and marketing. Together with Italo Vignoli, I help with the latter, and today I’ll summarise some of the achievements so far in 2017.

Debian/Ubuntu: Q4OS, Ubuntu Dock and LXD Weekly Status Update

  • There's Now a Windows 10 Installer for the Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distribution
    The Q4OS development team is pleased to inform us today about the immediate availability for download of a Windows installer for their Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution, Q4OS, allowing users to create a dual-boot environment on their PCs. For those not familiar to Q4OS, it's an open-source and free Linux distro based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), which resembles the look and feel of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop environment. Created with an emphasis on Windows users who want to migrate to a free, open-source, and more secure operating system, Q4OS now lets them install the distribution alongside Microsoft Windows in an easy manner, without having to do any modifications to your personal computer or install any other apps.
  • Ubuntu Dock Now Has Dynamic Transparency
    Ubuntu devs have listened to our gripe on the jarring contrast between GNOME 3.26's transparent top bar and the Ubuntu Dock.
  • Ubuntu Dock Features Adaptive Transparency on Ubuntu 17.10, Here's How It Works
    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche continues his development on the look and feel of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and today he announced that Ubuntu Dock is getting adaptive transparency. Canonical confirmed that Ubuntu 17.10 would come with the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, though the default session has suffered numerous modifications compared to the vanilla one to make things easier for those using the Unity interface on Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). Most probably, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users won't upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10, but we're sure Ubuntu 17.04 users will because it'll reach end of life in about four months from the moment of writing, sometime in January 2018. Therefore, Canonical wants to make their Unity to GNOME transition as painless as possible.
  • LXD: Weekly Status #15
    This week has been pretty quiet as far as upstream changes since half the team was attending the Open Source Summity, the Linux Plumbers Conference and the Linux Security Summit in Los Angeles, California.

Events: KDE/Randa 2017 and Linux Foundation

  • KMyMoney’s Łukasz Wojniłowicz in Randa
    Please read the following guest post from Łukasz who joined me last week in Randa to work on KMyMoney.
  • Randa 2017 – Databases are back to KMyMoney
    On the morning of Day 5 we chased and fixed a problem that was introduced a long time ago but never caused any trouble. The code goes back into the KDE3 version of KMyMoney and was caused by some changes inside Qt5. The fix prevents a crash when saving a transaction which opens an additional dialog to gather more information (e.g. price information). With the help of other devs here in Randa, we were able to drill down the problem and update the code to work on KF5/Qt5 keeping the existing functionality.
  • Randa 2017 – Days 3 and 4
    On Day 3, we started out at 7:02 as usual with the team responsible for breakfast meeting in the kitchen. KMyMoney wise, we worked some more on keyboard navigation and porting to KF5. The dialog to open a database and the logic around it have been rewritten/fixed, so that it is now possible to collect the information from the user and proceed with opening. The database I have on file for testing does not open though due to another problem which I still need to investigate.
  • Watch the Keynote Videos from Open Source Summit in Los Angeles
    If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit North America 2017 in Los Angeles, don’t worry! We’ve rounded up the following keynote presentations so you can hear from the experts about the growing impact of open source software.
  • uniprof: Transparent Unikernel for Performance Profiling and Debugging
    Unikernels are small and fast and give Docker a run for its money, while at the same time still giving stronger features of isolation, says Florian Schmidt, a researcher at NEC Europe, who has developed uniprof, a unikernel performance profiler that can also be used for debugging. Schmidt explained more in his presentation at Xen Summit in Budapest in July. Most developers think that unikernels are hard to create and debug. This is not entirely true: Unikernels are a single linked binary that come with a shared address space, which mean you can use gdb. That said, developers do lack tools, such as effective profilers, that would help create and maintain unikernels.