Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • OUYA is blocking a Linux version of That Dragon, Cancer being on Steam

    They do say they should be able to do it eventually, and they should be able to get a DRM free Linux build on their website. One of our editors 'flesk' also got clarification that they should have a Linux build up on some DRM free stores too like GOG, Humble Store and possibly Itch.

    We shouldn't go with pitchforks to OUYA, as the developers are as much to blame for either not reading their agreement properly, or simply not caring enough to argue their case.

    Either way, I'm personally quite annoyed by Linux gamers getting treated like this. With no word before release that this was happening, I think the developers need to learn to communicate a lot better. I personally messaged them to no reply, but I imagine they have been pretty busy to message everyone back. Still, an official note to backers would have been the right thing to do, not make people wait.

  • Medieval II: Total War Collection released for Linux & SteamOS

    The good thing is that this game is no way near as complicated as some of the others, and that keeps my simpleton brain very happy. The tutorial is quite short and to the point, and sets you up nice and easy for the battles to come.

  • Valve Releases Full Steam Link SDK and Reveals the Hardware Powering It

    Valve has just launched the complete Steam Link SDK, making way for developers and the community to build native apps for this piece of hardware.

    The idea behind the Steam Link is a really good one. Users can connect their gaming machines to the TV, via the network. This means that you don’t need a new and shiny Steam Machine if you already have a powerful computer at home. Valve wants to dominate the living room, but it doesn't care how it’s going to achieve that.

  • Valve Puts Out The Steam Link SDK With OpenGL ES, Qt & SDL Support

    Valve has finally released the SDK for their Steam Link device that began shipping late last year for playing Steam games on any TV in a house as long as there is a computer running Steam on your network.

    Valve's release of the Steam Links SDK has support for the OpenGL ES 2.0, Qt 5.4, and SDL 2.0 APIs. Apps can be loaded onto the Steam Link via copying them to a USB drive in a steamlink/apps folder and then power cycling the hardware. Valve also revealed there is SSH support for the Steam Link if wishing to debug any apps on the device.

Leftovers: Gaming (Jolt, PlayStation 4, Homefront...)

Filed under
Gaming
  • Indie marketplace Game Jolt releases open source desktop client

    Indie game marketplace and community Game Jolt has released its long-awaited desktop client.

    Currently available as a pre-release download, the open source client lets users browse, install, and play games without ever having to open a web browser.

  • PlayStation 4’s Linux Hack

    At present the full hack isn’t publicly available, nor is fail0verflow interested in releasing it, telling users to look elsewhere. Among the primary reasons for the decision are fear their work will be misused, possible legal issues, and that releasing the exploit would reveal information that could potentially enable piracy. Their prior exploits on the Wii and Wii U were released primarily to drive the homebrew community, but their release ended up resulting in piracy. They hope to redirect future users to reverse engineering instead of focusing on running Linux. which would be of little help to pirates but a bonus for the community.

    As “marcan” of fail0verflow put it: ”[W]e really think this is the way to go for the PS4. Write an exploit, point it to our loader, and you’ll get Linux (we’ll help you get it hooked up/debugged if needed). And if you want piracy, as usual, go away.”

  • Homefront: The Revolution aiming for a day-1 Linux & SteamOS release on May 20th

    I didn't expect Deep Silver to reply to me so quickly, but it seems the Linux & SteamOS release of Homefront: The Revolution will come out alongside Windows on May 20th!

  • The 2015 GamingOnLinux GOTY award is now over, here's the results!
  • Space Grunts, a really rather great turn-based action roguelike now fully released

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Medieval II: Total War

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unvanquished Free First-Person Shooter Game Gets Its First Release for 2016

    The guys over Unvanquished, a free and open-source FPS (First-person shooter) game for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows operating systems have just returned from their Winter holidays and released the first Alpha build for 2016.

  • SDL 2.0.4 Was Quietly Released Last Week With Wayland & Mir By Default

    SDL 2.0.4 is the release that most notably enables Mir and Wayland support by default! It was just by chance I stumbled across the new release earlier today and doesn't seem to really be advertised. SDL 2.0.4 was long overdue and besides enabling the Mir and Wayland back-end support by default it also adds IBus IME support, support for EmScripten and Google Native Client, modern CPU feature detection, Vivante video driver support, and much more.

  • Slime Rancher pre-alpha, DRM free, available for Linux

    Slime Rancher is the tale of Beatrix LeBeau, a plucky, young rancher who sets out for a life a thousand light years away from Earth on the 'Far, Far Range' where she tries her hand at making a living wrangling slimes. With a can-do attitude, plenty of grit, and her trusty vacpack, Beatrix attempts to stake a claim, amass a fortune, and avoid the continual peril that looms from the rolling, jiggling avalanche of slimes around every corner.

  • SteamOS beta updated to support Xbox One Elite gamepad

    For those not keeping an eye on the latest SteamOS updates, a new beta was pushed out a few days ago! It's good to see Valve keeping up with new hardware support.

  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.1 Is Now Available

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

Emulation and Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming
  • 1.4.0 released! - Year end report

    Along with the release comes our year end report for 2015. The following progress report will provide an overview of all the notable changes from the previous stable version, 1.2.1, to this update. Keep in mind many of the changes have been mentioned in previous progress reports, but are mentioned again as a changelog for 1.4.0. The changes since 1.2.1 are so many, some smaller, some quite massive, that it was impossible to write about all of them, but we believe we have nailed all the highlights!

  • Powerful PCSX2 PlayStation 2 Emulator for Linux and Windows Receives Massive Update

    Today, January 8, 2016, the developers of the PCSX2 software, an open source and cross-platform PlayStation 2 emulator for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows operating systems, were proud to announce the release of PCSX2 1.4.0.

  • Non-Linux FOSS: Open-Source Windows?

    I have mixed emotions about ReactOS. It's open source. It's freely available. But, its goal is to be binary-compatible with Windows! ReactOS is not a Linux operating system. In fact, it doesn't share the UNIX architecture at all. It looks like Windows NT, and it behaves much like Windows NT.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Intel's "Utter Garbage" Code Bricks and Delays Linux, Torvalds Furious

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.