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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • System Shock Remaster Linux Demo Released, System Requirements Shared

    Earlier this year a Kickstarter campaign was started to develop a System Shock remaster from the ground up. Not only has that campaign been fully funded now, it has 10 days to reach its stretch goal of $1.1 million that would allow developers to create a Linux and Mac OS port of the game. Right now the game is above $1 million so the campaign only has to raise less than $0.1 million to make this port a reality.

  • Gallium3D Optimizations Published For BioShock Infinite

    Marek Olšák of AMD has been working on some Gallium3D optimizations for boosting the performance of the popular BioShock Infinite game on Linux.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • GDC Europe survey shows 17% of developers plan to release Linux titles

    GDC Europe ran a survey of 800 games industry professionals who attended a previous GDC event and about 17% stated they plan a game for Linux.

    It's a really weird survey, as it pulls Windows/Mac together, but has Linux by itself. It would make more sense to have all three separated. They also say PC when they mean Windows, which is always annoying to see. Still, it's a pretty healthy percentage considering only a few years ago it would have probably been 0-1%.

    It's also amusing to see them do the survey, have Linux as an option which beats out multiple other platforms, yet they don't mention anything about Linux in the text.

  • Tyranny, the new RPG from Paradox and Obsidian is looking great in this new video
  • Ballistic Overkill FPS updated, lots of changes and still works great

    Ballistic Overkill is the fast paced FPS game I have fallen in love with and it just gained a tasty update.

    The game has down away with a single health station on the map, to now have health packs spread throughout the map. An interesting and needed change, but I feel they respawn far too quickly.

    The map voting system is much better. Instead of always being on a single mode, you pick a single map and each map comes with a different game mode. That makes the game feel a lot fresher in my opinion and helps stop me getting bored in longer sessions.

  • Lost Sea action and adventure game released for Linux, some thoughts

    Lost Sea is a really nice idea, mixing up action, adventure, RPG and random generation together to create something interesting. You also lose almost all progress when you die, so there's the punishment factor here. You don't lost everything, you get a bit of gold and XP for each tablet you get on the previous run.

    You sail from island to island collecting treasures, killing monsters and collecting stone tablets that enable you to move further along in your journey. It all sounds pretty good, but I've found the game to be rather lacking in every aspect of its design.

    The combat just seems so basic and lifeless it really lets down what could have been a very exciting game. You can upgrade your skillset to have a few nice extras but even so, it still feels a bit empty. It's not terrible though, just not really all that challenging at all, no real excitement factor to the combat. It's literally mash X a few times, maybe use a skill if you need too and—done.

  • Kingdom Rush Frontiers coming to Linux after the initial Windows launch
  • Darkest Dungeon updated, has some needed Linux fixes
  • Undertale now available for Linux on GOG

    Undertale recently released on Steam, but this weird 2D RPG is now also available DRM free on GOG. I know a few of you were waiting for this!

    My friends at GOG sent over a key and I can confirm it seems to work fine, I didn't encounter any obvious issues in my testing of the GOG build.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Undertale now available for SteamOS & Linux and it's on sale

    Thanks to the masses of people for letting me know. Undertale, the 2D RPG where you don't have to destroy anyone is now available for SteamOS and Linux.

  • Lovecraftian Horror Game "Conarium" Confirmed For Linux

    Zoetrope Interactive, makers of the well received Lovecraftian horror game "Darkness Within" (not available for Linux), have recently announced their next game "Conarium" and responded today on Twitter that, apart from a Mac OS version, this upcoming game will indeed also come to Linux!

  • Timbertales, a cross platform turn based strategy on Steam Greenlight and Kickstarter
  • The curious tale of vanishing Linux & SteamOS ports, a status on a few of them

    The one that is really getting on my nerves personally at the moment is Carmageddon: Reincarnation. It released into Early Access on March 27th 2014, over two years later the developer is still claiming we will one day get some sort of announcement. Their level of commitment to Linux has been a bit shocking.

    My next annoyance is of course The Witcher 3. It was announced by a big homepage image on Steam and then included in the big SteamOS sale. Over two years since the initial image on Steam and they still aren't confirming anything. My emails go completely unanswered too. We have a forum post that has been going for a while talking about it, where some people do seem to get replies. I fully believe they at one point intended to, and they changed their minds on it. Considering the developers never publicly confirmed it, I'm leaning more towards Valve acting without gaining absolute certainty on the port as they wanted another big name for SteamOS.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more