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Gaming

Steam client update ‘dramatically’ improves in-home experience

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Linux
Gaming

Valve has pushed another update to it’s Steam Client which brings many improvements to In-Home Steaming. Before you go ahead to download the client keep in mind that there is an issue with the updater which may download two or three times before ‘settling down’, as Sloken writes on the Steam Community page.

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SteamOS beta gets update

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Gaming

Valve has updated SteamOS beta which brings better support for wireless cards. If you are running beta of SteamOS you will be getting these updates. Those who are using stable version may change to beta version to get advantage of these packages. The update adds additional packages to the repo to support gdb, NFS, and creating an alchemist chroot.

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Leftovers: Games News

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Gaming

Expansion of Valve free games offer to Ubuntu developers

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Linux
Gaming
Ubuntu

As I'm sure most will be aware, for the last couple of weeks, Valve have
offered access to all Valve produced games free of charge to Debian
Developers [0].

As of today, they have kindly extended this to all registered Ubuntu
Developers [1].

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DragonBox Pyra open source mobile game console to pick up where OpenPandora left off

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Linux
Gaming

It’s been a few years since a group of developers started working on an open source handheld gaming device called the OpenPandora. A lot’s changed since the original designs were drawn up, and now one of the developers has announced plans for a new device which should offer the kind of performance you’d get from a high-end phone or tablet in 2014. It just happens to be built on a much more open design.

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Leftovers: Games News

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Gaming

Introducing Steam's new Music features

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Gaming

The Steam Music Beta is coming soon to Big Picture and SteamOS interfaces, with desktop features soon to follow. To express interest in beta participation, join the Steam Music community group. Group members will be invited in waves, until the feature is released to everyone.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Unigine Engine Splits Into Game And Sim Products

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Linux
Gaming

Unigine Corp has shared that their flagship advanced 3D engine, which originally was targeted for games but is now seeing greater use within simulators and professional 3D visualization areas, is forking into Unigine Sim and Unigine Game.

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Space Hulk released for Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Full Control’s Space Hulk, the studio’s adaptation of the Warhammer 40,000 board-game, is now available on Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

4Duino combines Arduino, WiFi, and a 2.4-inch touchscreen

4D Systems launched a $79 “4Duino-24” Arduino compatible board, with a 2.4-inch resistive touchscreen and an ESP8266 WiFi module. One reason you might choose a Linux SBC like a Raspberry Pi over an Arduino is that it’s easier to control an LCD display for simple IoT GUIs and other HMI applications. Now the 4Duino-24 board aims to smooth the path to Arduino-based IoT displays with an Arduino Leonardo clone board that not only adds an ESP8266 WiFi module, but also includes a 2.4-inch TFT LCD display with resistive touch. Read more Also: Tegra TK1 COM Express module runs Ubuntu at 15W

The 25 biggest events in Linux's 25-year history

You can argue about Linux's official birthday. Heck, even Linus Torvalds thinks there are four different dates in 1991 that might deserve the honor. Regardless, Linux is twenty-five years old this year. Here are some of its highlights and lowlights. Read more Also: 25 Years of Linux: What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been

Today in Techrights

Conferences and Kids

I've taken my daughter, now 13, to FOSDEM in Brussels every year that I had slots there. She isn't a geek, yet enjoys the crowds and the freebies. When I could, I also took my kids to other events, where I was speaking. In this post I'd like to capture my feelings about why children should be part of conferences, and what conferences can do to make this easier. First off, the "why?" Traditional conferences (in all domains, not just software) are boring, ritualized events where the participants compete to see who can send the most people to sleep at once. The real event starts later, over alcohol. It is a strictly adult affair, and what happens at the conf stays at the conf. Now our business is a little different. It is far more participative. Despite our history of finicky magic technologies that seem to attract mainly male brains, we strive for diversity, openness, broad tolerance. Most of what we learn and teach comes through informal channels. Finished is formal education, elitism, and formal credentials. We are smashing the barriers of distance, wealth, background, gender, and age. Read more