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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Steam for Linux Has Just Passed the 1,900 Mark for Linux and SteamOS Games

    You won't believe this (we don't believe it either), but there are now over 1,900 games available for the Linux and SteamOS platforms on Valve's Steam gaming distribution platform.

    Why don't we believe it? Because only a week ago, we wrote an article about Steam for Linux just passing the 1,800 mark for SteamOS and Linux games. On January 21, 2016, there were exactly 1,801 titles when browsing Steam's game catalogue with the SteamOS + Linux filter active.

  • State of the Industry: Developer stats that were too weird to publish

    There are a few platforms in our survey that are either on the way out or much smaller than the others, but are still actively being developed for. Linux, for example, is many developers' platform of choice. But how many developers? Turns out this year only 6.3% of developers are currently making a game for Linux, compared to 7.8% last year. And only 5.8% plan for their next game to target Linux.

  • Stella 4.7 Free Atari 2600 VCS Emulator Gets Paddle Emulation Improvements

    The development team behind the Stella open-source, free and cross-platform Atari 2600 VCS emulator software have announced the release of Stella 4.7, a major version that adds several new features and many under-the-hood improvements.

Steam for Linux Has Just Passed the 1,900 Mark for Linux and SteamOS Games

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

You won't believe this (we don't believe it either), but there are now over 1,900 games available for the Linux and SteamOS platforms on Valve's Steam gaming distribution platform.

Why don't we believe it? Because only a week ago, we wrote an article about Steam for Linux just passing the 1,800 mark for SteamOS and Linux games. On January 21, 2016, there were exactly 1,801 titles when browsing Steam's game catalogue with the SteamOS + Linux filter active.

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Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming/Wine

Filed under
Gaming

Lakka Is A Linux OS That Converts Any Computer Into A Gaming Console

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

It’s time to go to your basement, clean your dusty old PC and make it ready for something fun. Using the lightweight Linux distro Lakka, you can turn that old pal into a retro gaming machine. This ready-to-install system is derived from OpenELEC, a version of Kodi home theater software. The OS also acts as a DIY retro emulation console based upon the RetroArch emulator software.

The strength of Lakka lies in the wide range of hardware it supports and useful feature like Braid-like rewinding, video streaming, and joypad hotplug. Once installed on your SD card, it is easy to set up and runs all your favorite vintage games.

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It’s Time to Open up the GPU

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

The second is a commitment to open source software. The game and graphics development community is an active hub of enthusiastic individuals who believe in the value of sharing knowledge. Full and flexible access to the source of tools, libraries and effects is a key pillar of the GPUOpen philosophy. Only through open source access are developers able to modify, optimize, fix, port and learn from software. The goal? Encouraging innovation and the development of amazing graphics techniques and optimizations in PC games.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • Sexy MF says things related to game programming on Linux, and tells you why you shouldn’t learn C!

    Now, at this point, I have a humble confession to make. I don’t know C! Specifically pointers. I never got into it at a young age, because after life with my Sinclair ZX Spectrum had come to a halt, I didn’t have access to a PC with a C compiler so that I could follow things in a natural progression (and my parents wanted me to get off the computer and focus on my schoolwork – probably the main reason I did so badly there!). I do remember reading about them at the time (in a book I got for my birthday at the time, in fact), but since I couldn’t actually try it out anywhere, they never became part of my bloodstream! This is the main reason I couldn’t actually try out anything from the Abrash book, since the whole thing assumes you’re adept at C! This has been a huge stumbling block in my programming education, since every single book on data structures or graphics programming, or what have you (not to mention websites like this one), assumes you know C. Now, today, where it’s actually taught in school (wasn’t the case back then), let me give you my opinion – I’m glad I never learnt pointers! There’s nothing wrong with understanding indirection, but when you’re trying to think of and implement a particular algorithm, trying to think of what the 0s and 1s are doing inside the computer is just hugely counter intuitive. This is not how human beings think. C was made so that an operating system could be written in it – that is the crux of how pointers came into being, and for some reason that hacker language caught on to become the most prevalent language in the whole world! Of course, it also led a young kid called Linus Torvalds to use it to do it all over again starting in 1991 (incidentally Linus, before the PC, worked on the QL, another member of the Sinclair family, a sort of a “big cousin” to the Spectrum), thanks to which you’re reading this website today, so I guess it wasn’t altogether a bad thing. But I, for one am glad that we’ve moved on to things like Javascript, in today’s day and age, and it makes me happy that we don’t have to worry about what’s zapping in and out of RAM when trying to write a game. Just at that point where those in charge of the Indian education system want their charges to know about nothing else but the syntax of weird things with asterisks in them (it seems, the more asterisks, the better), as if that was important. Trust the fools! Incidentally, I did get hold of a Youtube video about pointers sometime back, and followed it through, and yes, I did finally get what they are (where was that animation back in 1992?), but I guess it’s too late now – Javascript occupies much more of my mind now than C ever will, and I can’t say that makes me unhappy in any way. All along, I knew what [ and ] do in Assembly in any case! I just wish there were more folks like me, who will now have the happy task of porting, in their own minds, all the code in the Abrash book, to whatever their favourite language is, so that in the case of Javascript, wonder of wonders – their browser can show them the joy of a rotating cube! That’s why the exhortations of this article. By the way, I suggest you Youtube for “banana bread” some time – good stuff! This is clearly the future, and you need to get a handle on it.

  • Vagante, a nifty-looking platformer with permadeath, available on Linux

    Fans of challenging platformers with the trendy roguelite appellation might be interested to know that there's something new that they can sink their teeth into. Vagante promises countless hours of procedurally generated fun alone or with friends.

  • Atari Vault, a 100 classic game collection heading to SteamOS & Linux

    This is lovely news, Atari Vault a new official collection of 100 classic games is heading to SteamOS & Linux

  • Escape from Tarkov, the new Russian Survival MMO FPS looks like it's heading to Linux

    Escape from Tarkov is an interesting looking Russian-made action MMO that is apparently going to come to Linux too.

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