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Gaming

Games: Avorion and Unigine

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Gaming
  • Avorion, a procedural co-op space sandbox is now on Linux and it looks awesome
  • Unigine Needs Your Help Testing Out Their New Hardware Detection

    Unigine will soon be releasing their much-anticipated Superposition benchmark. This is their first tech demo / benchmark powered by Unigine Engine 2 and will be stunning for Linux users and don't mind stressing their high-end graphics card and OpenGL driver.

    Unigine Superposition was supposed to be released in Q4 but was pushed back to Q1. I've already run it internally and found it to be exquisite. Really beautiful and demanding benchmark, I am very excited for its GA release and at that time will be a ton of Linux GPU/driver benchmarks for this brand new test case.

Wine and Games

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Padoka or Oibaf PPA for Ubuntu Gaming? Tell Us Which One Do You Prefer and Why

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Gaming
Ubuntu

Ubuntu gamers with older AMD Radeon or Intel graphics cards know by now that they have to the install a third-party PPA (Personal Package Archive) that contains the latest open-source graphics drivers to enjoy a much better gaming experience.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Monumental Failure is absolutely hilarious, a game you just need to try

    The developers of Monumental Failure [Steam, Official Site] sent over a key for me to test out their hilarious and totally historically accurate game about building monuments.

    I might have been lying about it being historically accurate, since I’m pretty sure they didn’t have jetpacks when this stuff was built.

    You’re controlling two groups of people at the same time, to build a monument. While that doesn’t sound too difficult, you are given the most ridiculous way of building them. From sliding a big statue down a massive slide, to using jetpacks with an item attached by bungee ropes.

  • Some thoughts on the Shadowrun series
  • Unreal Engine 4.15 Preview 1 Brings AArch64 Linux Support

    It's been a while since the last update to Unreal Engine 4, but available today is the first public preview release for UE4.15.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Appreciating how far Linux gaming has actually come in the past few years

    During the livestream I did last night I had one of those moments where you fully appreciate how far Linux gaming has come.

  • A developer of the awesome itch games client has a blog post on compressing files for updates

    The guys over at itch.io are doing some truly interesting work. The itch store is open to all developers, they have an open source client and they talk openly about their work. A developer of their games client has written up about how they compress data for downloads.

  • IORTCW Continues Letting Return to Castle Wolfenstein Live On As Open-Source

    For those looking to relive some old gaming moments this weekend, the iortcw project continues to be developed as the open-source code-base around Return to Castle Wolfenstein.

    It's been 16 years since "RTCW" was first released or even 15 years since it first had a native Linux port while iortcw continues to see routine code commits for this open-source game derived from ioquake3. Over the original classic game, iortcw offers SDL 2 support, OpenAL sound, full x86_64 support, VoIP support, Ogg Vorbis audio support, PNG support, and many other more modern features.

  • 'Detention 返校' is an immersive psychological horror adventure with 'overwhelmingly positive' reviews, demo available

    Honestly, I never heard about 'Detention 返校' or the developers behind it, the Taiwanese indie studio Red Candle Games, until Steam recommended me the title a few days ago. Since I love games which have received a lot of care in their ambience and artistic style, naturally this one caught my attention immediately, and once I learned that it has a demo available, then it became a priority in a matter of seconds.

    In order to get the demo, you'll need to visit the official site, then go to 'Subscribe' and enter a valid email address twice. Also, there is one more detail: at least in my case, I had to create an account at Mega.nz to be able to download the Linux build (approximately 1 GB of content), because when I was at 94% of completion a message suddenly appeared about reaching a daily limit, or something like that.

  • The interesting survival game 'Raft' has dropped Linux support

    Sad news, the survival game 'Raft' that really caught my interest for doing something very different has decided to drop Linux support.

    It's a real shame as it was the first survival game to come along for quite some time that properly interested me.

  • Our Fifth Podcast with Feral Interactive

    Well this is already 2017 yet we have something left from 2016 to release. Our podcast conducted with our friends from Feral, that is! While it was recorded back in December, the different edits and the holidays in-between have somewhat caused some delays, but do not worry one bit: its content is still as fresh as ever.

More Games

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Gaming

Leftovers: Games

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Gaming

Steam's Recent Linux Changes Have Been Promoted To Stable

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Linux
Gaming

At the beginning of 2017 Valve released a Steam client beta with noteworthy Linux improvements. With today's Steam stable client update, all of those changes are included.

The big winner with this stable client update is improved interaction between the Steam runtime and host distribution libraries. This should let those using open-source graphics drivers on modern distributions work nicely with Steam without needing to remove any files or set extra environment variables. The old behavior can be restored though for older Linux distributions or if encountering any problems.

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Also: Valve Rebases SteamOS on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7, Adds Mesa 13.0.3 & Nvidia 375.26

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Imperium Galactica II: Alliances released for Linux & SteamOS, seems native too

    Imperium Galactica II: Alliances [GOG, Steam] just released for Linux & SteamOS and it looks like it's a native version.

    Note: My friends at GOG sent over a copy, so big thanks to them.

    There's no sign of DOSBox or Wine and I had no idea this game had ever been ported to Linux. Pretty awesome really for a game like this to get a proper Linux build when it gets a new release.

  • Nearly five years after the Kickstarter, Carmageddon still isn’t on Linux despite the stretch goal being reached

    The problem here, for me, is that they later did a revamp of the title called Carmageddon: Max Damage. This was to fix some problems, boost sales again and port it to consoles.

    Carmageddon: Max Damage also never made it to Linux.

    Fun fact, they actually released a trailer where they just run over a ton of penguins, make from that what you will:

    Not saying this was trolling the entire Linux gaming community, but it sure felt like it after their previous trolling attempts directed at our official Twitter account.

  • Valve Rolls Out New Steam Client Stable Update with Promised Linux Changes, More

    Today Valve announced the availability of a new stable update of the Steam Client for all supported platforms, including the company's SteamOS operating system for Steam Machines, as well as GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    Bringing all the new features during the Beta stages of development, the new Steam Client update improves the interaction between the Steam runtime and your GNU/Linux distribution's libraries. This is a huge and long-anticipated milestone for the Steam Client, which, unfortunately, did not work out-of-the-box on all Linux-based operating systems.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics