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Nemesys Is Porting Their Games To Linux

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Gaming Nemesys, a game studio run out of Budapest, is porting their game titles to Linux. The studio's current titles include Fortix 2, A.C.S, and Ignite. Nemesys Ignite, in particular, is a very promising racing game that will surely roar things up for Linux.

FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?

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Gaming FreeBSD provides a Linux binary compatibility layer that allows 32-bit Linux binaries to be natively executed on this BSD operating system. Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD allows Linux-only applications to be executed in a near seamless manner, even for games.

Germany Lifts ‘Doom’ Ban After 17 Years

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  • Germany Lifts ‘Doom’ Ban After 17 Years – Toast Demons To Celebrate
  • Gametype-Revolution 0.70
  • 5 Roguelike games
  • Unity GNU/Linux Exporter Update
  • Salem : New Crafting MMO for Linux Previewed at Gamescom 2011
  • Dungeons of Dredmor still coming to Linux!
  • Mari0 : Super Mario Bros. with a Portal Gu
  • Tetris Meets Physics In This Crazy New Version
  • Spirited Heart Girl’s Love Is Out

The Real Texas Coming Soon To Linux

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  • The Real Texas Coming Soon To GNU/Linux
  • 'Blocks That Matter' Wins $40,000 in Dream.Build.Play 2011 Competition
  • Sintel - The Game
  • Another Studio Is Working On A Unigine-Based Game
  • Pax Britannica

Marball Odyssey Released For GNU/Linux

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  • Marball Odyssey Released For GNU/Linux
  • Oil Rush is now available in the Software Center!
  • Incognito 3.9 Released

My Favorite Little Games

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Gaming "Little games" is a term I use to describe those that are quick to start, easy to play, and quick to exit. These are the ones that usually come installed by default with most Linux distributions. Some have GNOME and KDE counterparts, but all are fun. Here are a few of my favorites.

Building With Someone Else's Blocks: Going Open Source With Games

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Gaming While commercial products are rarely open source, many different projects have explored the possibilities of opening up the code to the community -- and in this feature, Gamasutra looks at some examples and speaks to the minds behind them.

It's a Roll of the Dice for Linux Game Makers

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Gaming If you had the option to pick your own price for a computer game that only runs on your Linux rig, would you pay to play? Not if you are a typical Linux gamer. At least, that's the popular perception of fans of free and open source software.

Wholesome Threesome on Tux4Kids

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Gaming Well if you want your children to enjoy exploring educational concepts then Tux4kids is the distro for you. It offers that elusive technology platform with which your kids will feel at home and you will have the flexibility to customize it to match their growing needs.

Linux Free Mega Games Pack

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Gaming Free Mega Games Pack (FreeMGP) Vol. 1 for Linux is an endeavor by LastOS team at to create a free mega compilation of open-source and freeware games with light system requirements.

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More in Tux Machines

KTU exams to run on open source software

All examinations of the A.P.J. Abdul Kalam Technological University (KTU) — which run on an online platform — would switch to open source software from the second semester onwards. For the first semester examinations, the KTU would use a proprietary, Microsoft, software. In response to demands from student organisations, the KTU has pushed back its first semester examinations by two days. The first of the examinations would now begin on December 4 instead of December 2. The first of the results would be published on December 19. Read more Also: KTU goes ahead with exam outsourcing

CMS News

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security updates
  • Researchers poke hole in custom crypto built for Amazon Web Services
    Underscoring just how hard it is to design secure cryptographic software, academic researchers recently uncovered a potentially serious weakness in an early version of the code library protecting Amazon Web Services. Ironically, s2n, as Amazon's transport layer security implementation is called, was intended to be a simpler, more secure way to encrypt and authenticate Web sessions. Where the OpenSSL library requires more than 70,000 lines of code to execute the highly complex TLS standard, s2n—short for signal to noise—has just 6,000 lines. Amazon hailed the brevity as a key security feature when unveiling s2n in June. What's more, Amazon said the new code had already passed three external security evaluations and penetration tests.
  • Social engineering: hacker tricks that make recipients click
    Social engineering is one of the most powerful tools in the hacker's arsenal and it generally plays a part in most of the major security breaches we hear about today. However, there is a common misconception around the role social engineering plays in attacks.
  • Judge Gives Preliminary Approval to $8 Million Settlement Over Sony Hack
    Sony agreed to reimburse employees up to $10,000 apiece for identity-theft losses
  • Cyber Monday: it's the most wonderful time of year for cyber-attackers
    Malicious attacks on shoppers increased 40% on Cyber Monday in 2013 and 2014, according to, an anti-malware and spyware company, compared to the average number of attacks on days during the month prior. Other cybersecurity software providers have identified the December holiday shopping season as the most dangerous time of year to make online purchases. “The attackers know that there are more people online, so there will be more attacks,” said Christopher Budd, Trend Micro’s global threat communications manager. “Cyber Monday is not a one-day thing, it’s the beginning of a sustained focus on attacks that go after people in the holiday shopping season.”

Openwashing (Fake FOSS)