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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Achievement Unlocked, There Are Now Over 2,000 Games on Steam for Linux

    Yes, that's right, you're reading it correctly: as of today, March 31, 2016, there are over 2,000 games on Steam that offer support for the Linux platform, including Valve's SteamOS gaming operating system based on Debian GNU/Linux.

  • Unreal Engine 4.11 Released with Major New Features, Countless Improvements

    Today, March 31, 2016, Epic Games has had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of its brand-new Unreal Engine 4.11 game engine software for all supported platforms.

  • 0 A.D. Alpha 20 Timosthenes Free RTS Game Released with Ten New Maps, More

    After more than four months of development, free RTS (real-time strategy) game 0 A.D. was updated on March 31, 2016, by developer Wildfire Games to version Alpha 20, dubbed Timosthenes.

    0 A.D. Alpha 20 Timosthenes comes with a bunch of cool new features, among which we can mention ten new maps, including the Stronghold, Hell’s Pass, Empire, Ambush, Lions Den, Island Stronghold, Flood. There are also Frontier random maps, and the Golden Island and Forest Battle skirmish maps for two and four players, respectively.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Don't Starve: Shipwrecked Expansion sails out of Early Access, Linux supported

    Don't Starve: Shipwrecked Expansion is a pretty big expansion to the really great survival game Don't Starve. It is now fully available and features Linux support.

    I haven't had a chance to look at it yet myself, but the reviews are suggesting it's amazing.

  • 1993 Space Machine, a game originally meant for the Amiga is coming to Linux

    1993 Space Machine a game that was originally supposed to be on Amiga, but never released is out for other platforms. The developer has confirmed it's on its way to Linux.

    It doesn't just look retro, it really is retro. The game was built in 1993 and has been released in 2016. Now this right here is a proper classic game.

  • Hyper Light Drifter Classic Action RPG Now Available on Steam for Linux

    The anticipated Hyper Light Drifter role-playing game that was first spotted on Kickstarter two and a half years ago, has been finally released today on Steam.

  • Hyper Light Drifter released, some thoughts
  • Unreal Engine 4.11 Released With Better Performance & Greater Visuals

    Epic Games is ending out the month by releasing the newest version of UE4, Unreal Engine 4.11.

    Unreal Engine 4.11 delivers a wide variety of performance improvements, greater parallelism thanks to threading improvements. new realistic hair shading, realistic eye shading, improved skin shading, realistic cloth shading, capsule shadows, particle depth of field, improved hierarchical LOD, support for LLVM Clang 3.7 on Linux, and a ton of other improvements.

  • There Is A Steam Linux Game Where Nouveau On Kepler Is Outperforming NVIDIA's Blob

    With yesterday's Nouveau Kepler vs. Maxwell Performance On Linux 4.6 + Mesa 11.3-dev benchmarks, a number of Phoronix readers expressed their surprise how well the GeForce 600/700 "Kepler" series hardware was performing on the open-source Nouveau driver once manually re-clocking these graphics cards. It's certainly much better than the GTX 900 series performance on Nouveau as the Maxwell GPUs don't have any re-clocking support on Nouveau at all. I'm working on some fresh Nouveau vs. NVIDIA Kepler tests and for one Steam Linux game, this reverse-engineered NVIDIA open-source driver is able to beat out the "binary blob" from NVIDIA.

  • CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 15.1.0 for Linux and Mac, Based on Wine 1.8.1

    CrossOver developer CodeWeavers has just informed us via an email announcement about the immediate availability of CrossOver 15.1.0 graphical interface for Wine, for both GNU/Linux and Mac OS X platforms.

  • CrossOver 15.1 Released For Linux & OS X Users

    CodeWeavers this morning announced the release of CrossOver 15.1 as the latest version of their software to allow Windows programs to run on Linux and OS X. CrossOver 15.1 is now powered by Wine 1.8.1.

Linux now has 2,000 games on Steam, big milestone

Filed under
Gaming

I have double checked this, and it seems to be accurate. Linux now has 2,000 games on Steam, and that's a pretty healthy milestone.

Read more

Free Software and Proprietary Games, Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • QEMU 2.6 Is Coming With Many Improvements

    QEMU 2.6-rc0 was tagged today as the first milestone leading up to the QEMU 2.6 release in the near future.

    QEMU 2.6 is bringing many ARM and MIPS improvements, support for new x86 CPU features, QEMU VFIO now supports AMD XGBE platform passthrough, performance improvements in VirtIO, SDL2 and SPICE now support OpenGL and VirGL, block device improvements, and more.

  • OpenToonz Animation Software Begins Seeing Linux Support

    Toonz is an animation software solution used by studios like Studio Ghibli and has been in development for more than two decades. Earlier this month it was announced Toonz would be open-sourced and then a few days back the code was published as OpenToonz. While Toonz/OpenToonz originally didn't have Linux support, patches are emerging to allow this high-end animation software to run on Linux.

  • Libav's libavcodec Adds New VA-API Encoders

    For those still relying upon the FFmpeg-forked libav project, their libavcodec code has added new VA-API encoder support.

    With the Video Acceleration API (VA-API) largely backed by Intel, the Libav code-base is supporting GPU-accelerated H.264 encoding and H.265/HEVC encoding.

  • Latest Steam Client Beta Adds Support for Steam Controller to OpenVR Games

    Just three days ago, we reported about the latest stable Steam Client update Valve pushed to Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows users, which brought numerous Steam Controller and SteamVR features, and now a new Beta version is out.

  • It Was Only 4 Years Ago That Many Thought Steam On Linux Was An April Fools' Day Joke

    While there are around two thousand Linux-native games now available on Steam brought over by many different studios, it was just four years ago that many thought Valve bringing Steam to Linux was a joke or far-fetched rumor.

    Today marks four years to the day since Gabe Newell had emailed us about Linux driver problems in their porting of Source Engine games to Linux as part of their initial Steam Linux bring-up. Many didn't believe it then, in part due to being close to April Fools' Day, and even when in 2012 I went out to Valve's HQ to talk with them about their Linux plans including what would become Steam Machines and SteamOS.

  • Vivaldi 1.0 Web Browser Is Just Around the Corner, Based on Chromium 49.0

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard has announced earlier the release and immediate availability for testing of what appears to be one of the last snapshots before the final build of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.0 web browser.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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How will the GDPR impact open source communities?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was approved by the EU Parliament on April 14, 2016, and will be enforced beginning May 25, 2018. The GDPR replaces the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC which was designed "to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, to protect and empower all EU citizens data privacy and to reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy." The aim of the GDPR is to protect the personal data of individuals in the EU in an increasingly data-driven world. Read more

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!