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  • Samsung’s new Chromebook Pro comes with an S Pen

    OK, it’s no longer called an S Pen, but the Samsung Chromebook Pro has a PEN. All all caps pen, so you know it’s a big deal, even if it does look exactly like an S Pen pulled from the cold dead fingers of the Galaxy Note 7 (too soon?). All jokes aside, this new Chromebook from Samsung actually looks really nice, and it can be picked up right now on Samsung Korea’s website.

  • Steam Finds Win 10 Losing Players, Win 7 and Linux Gaming Rising

    Does Linux hold a chance to compete with Windows as a gaming operating system? Well, not exactly. Despite Steam’s work on SteamOS, it doesn’t seem like Linux is about to become a major gaming operating system any time soon. But it’s definitely growing, and Steam users understand its benefits. Perhaps by this time next year, Mac will be going head-to-head with Linux players in the Steam Hardware Survey.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Transport Fever confirmed for day-1 Linux release on November 8th, plus gameplay video

    Transport Fever [Official Site, Steam] is really starting to look great, and the best news is that Linux is confirmed to be a day-1 release. We also have a new gameplay video.

    This is the first actual proper gameplay video, and it's really got me excited to try it out.

    It's impressive that you can zoom right into street level and see each individual person walking or driving around.

  • Looks like the beautiful open source RTS '0 A.D.' is closing in on the next release, Alpha 21
  • Colony building sim 'Maia' has a big update, taking another look

    'Maia' [Official Site, Steam] is an Early Access colony building sim that has always shown promise, but the problem is that it has been quite buggy. This new release has polished the game up quite a bit.

    The AI certainly feels a lot more polished, there's far less wandering around when you have set down some build orders, something that plagued earlier builds. It still happens, but far less often.

  • Tyranny, the new RPG from Obsidian, gets a release date

    This is a game I’m personally very excited for. I enjoyed Pillars of Eternity a great deal – even if it had more than its fair share of kinks at launch. The premise for Tyranny is a world where the evil overlord has won and the player is entrusted to pacify and hand down judgment in the conquered lands. Developer diaries and videos emphasize that choices can have very far-ranging consequences on the game world and so this should be a title with plenty of replayability. The setting and lore also seem pretty interesting so I can’t wait until the game is out to explore it.

  • Steam Dev Days: VR, VR, VR; Valve Looking To Contract Mesa Developers For AMD Work

    For those not paying attention to the #SteamDevDays tweets from the many developers at the Seattle event, the first day of Valve's 2016 conference appears to have been a huge success and the overall focus was on VR.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux (VR Support for Linux and More)

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
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