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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • BioWare's 'Orbit 'Java framework now open source

    BioWare has announced that it is making its Orbit Java framework open source. Orbit is described by BioWare as a Java framework to "build and maintain distributed, secure, and scalable online services." This is the same toolset it used to develop technology used in Dragon Age: Inquisition and the Dragon Age Keep, according to BioWare.

  • Bioware Releases an Open Source Version of Orbit

    Bioware has released an open source version of Orbit. The platform is described as the “next-generation” of online technology which is Java Framework, helping in development of secure, stable and scalable online services.

  • Use BioWare's networking tech in your game -- for free

    This week BioWare released an open source version of Orbit, the Java framework that underlies some of the persistent cross-platform online systems at work in Dragon Age: Inquisition and the Dragon Age Keep utility, in an effort to further develop it with help from the developer community.

  • BioWare open sources networking tech Orbit
  • KDots 0.5.3 released

    I gladly want to inform about the next release 0.5.3 of the game KDots, KDE-based prototype of the game of dots.

    This release includes several bug fixes in the game play in general and the new AI plugin based on the Minimax strategy with heuristics for local decisions that showed significant smarter decision making during trial tests.

  • Linux Usage Rose By A Tiny Amount On Steam Last Month

    Valve's monthly hardware/software survey is out for the data collected in March and provides an interesting look at the current Linux gaming market-share.

  • Bonus: A low score of games after a score of games

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Launching into Orbit

    We’re excited to announce today the release of a BioWare project that’s unlike anything we’ve done before. Over the past few months, the BioWare Online Services team has been working hard on the next-generation of our online technology platform: Orbit.

  • The Big SuperTuxKart Update Is Almost Ready

    Towards the end of last year a development version of a big new version of SuperTuxKart was released that brought a new OpenGL 3.1+ graphics engine and other improvements. The new SuperTuxKart game looks great (especially for being an open-source game) and is now closer to being officially released with now having an RC version out.

  • Humble Indie Bundle 14 Drops Torchlight 2, Outlast, and Other Awesome Games on Linux

    Following on the footsteps of the fantastic success of the previous Humble Indie Bundle initiatives, the awesome people behind Humble Bundle, Inc. have put together yet another amazing collection of cross-platform games entitled Humble Indie Bundle 14.

  • New Linux Gaming Survey For April

    The new GOL survey for April is now available, so please make sure to fill it in if you have the time.

  • Team Fortress 2 Update Brings Balancing Fixes

    Team Fortress 2 is an online multiplayer game developed by Valve and it's one of the most popular titles on Steam for Linux. A new update has been released for it, and it applies to the Linux version as well.

  • Grass Simulator Fully Released With Linux Support

    April Fools! Wait, this is real? Grass Simulator added Linux support recently, and today they have released the final version.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

today's leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

today's leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • QEMU 2.3 RC1 Released With Many Last Minute Changes

    Following last week's QEMU 2.3-rc0 release, out today is 2.3-RC1 with over 100 changes in the past few days.

  • Shotwell 0.22.0 Photo Manager Released [Install in Ubuntu]

    Shotwell is a powerful photo manager for GNOME, and a good alternative to applications such as DigiKam (for KDE) or Fotoxx. Shotwell comes with features such as organizing tools, editing photos by applying various adjustments, tags and has support for formats like JPG, PNG, BMP, TIFF, RAW photo images and video files.

  • Pixar Puts Out Free, Non-Commercial Spin Of RenderMan

    This proprietary software is available for 64-bit Linux with GCC 4.4.5+ and Glibc 2.12+. There's also builds for OS X and Windows.

  • MuseScore 2.0 Released!

    Today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the official MuseScore 2.0 release! This release represents the culmination of over four years of development, including technical contributions from over 400 people and feedback from hundreds more users to make this the best free and open source notation program in the world.

  • cursedmate: Right ingredients, but not yet perfect

    cursedmate is python-driven, and isn’t a bad game on the whole. The animation and movement effects are smooth, and pop-up menus and displays don’t get in the way of the action.

  • Three ways to run Windows software in Linux

    Some users switch to Linux to completely get away from Windows. But others still find some Windows software helpful or important. If you're one of those users, you'll be happy to know that there are a number of ways you can run Windows software in Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora-Based Qubes OS 3.0 Release Candidate 1 Linux Distro Now Available for Testing

Joanna Rutkowska announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Release Candidate version of the forthcoming Qubes OS 3.0 computer operating system based on the Fedora Linux distribution. Read more

Debian GNU/Linux 9.0 Will Be Named Stretch

On April 26, the Debian Release Team, through Niels Thykier, announced that the next major release of the acclaimed Debian GNU/Linux computer operating system will be named Stretch. Read more

Linux 4.1-rc1

It's been a normal merge window, and I'm releasing according to the normal schedule. The few days of travel didn't seem to matter, as I had internet access at all times. The merge window is pretty normal in terms of what got merged too. Just eyeballing the size, it looks like this is going to fit right in - while 4.0 was a bit smaller than usual, 4.1 seems to be smack dab in the middle of the normal range for the last couple of years. And all the patch statistics look normal as well: the bulk of the changes are to drivers (just under 60% of the patch), with arch updates being about 20% of it all, and the rest is spread all over. No earth-shattering new features come to mind, even if initial support for ACPI on arm64 looks funny. Depending on what you care about, your notion of "big new feature" may differ from mine, of course. There's a lot of work all over, and some of it might just make a big difference to your use cases. So go out and test. Even -rc1, as raw as it may sometimes be, has tended to be pretty good. It's not that scary. Promise. Read more

Quad-core ARM TV-PC dual boots Android and Ubuntu

Ugoos launched a $179 “UT3S” TV-PC that dual boots Android 4.4 and Ubuntu 14.10 on a 1.8GHz quad-core Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288, and supports 4Kx2K video. Finding a media player or mini-PC that runs Android is easy, but finding one that ships with other species of Linux pre-installed is a bit trickier. Now Ugoos has released a TV-focused Ugoos UT3S mini-PC that can run either Android 4.4 or Ubuntu 14.10 in dual-boot mode. Whereas Ugoos’s earlier Android-based UM2 stick-PC and UT2 mini-PC used the quad-core, Cortex-A9 Rockchip RK3188 SoC clocked to 1.6GHz, the UT3S moves up to the quad-core, Cortex-A17 RK3288 at 1.8GHz. The RK3288, which ships with ARM’s Mali-T764 GPU, is also found in new Android media players including the Tronsmart Orion R28. Read more