Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

New Wine and GNU/Linux Games

Filed under
Gaming

Graphics and Games: RandR and AMDGPU, Opus Magnum

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • "NonDesktop" Proposed For RandR: Useful For VR & Apple Touch Bar Like Devices

    Besides Keith Packard working on the concept of resource leasing for the X.Org Server and resource leasing support for RandR, he's also now proposing a "NonDesktop" property for the Resize and Rotate protocol.

    The resource leasing has already been worked out as a candidate for the next update, RandR 1.6, while now this veteran X11 developer is proposing a new "NonDesktop" property for identifying outputs that are not conventional displays.

  • More AMDGPU Changes Queue For Linux 4.15

    Adding to the excitement of Linux 4.15, AMD has queued some more changes that were sent in today for DRM-Next.

    Already for Linux 4.15, the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver should have the long-awaited "DC" display stack that brings Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting and more. Other pull requests have also brought in a new ioctl, UVD video encode ring support on Polaris, transparent huge-pages DMA support, PowerPlay clean-ups, and many fixes, among other low-level improvements.

  • Opus Magnum, the latest puzzle game from Zachtronics, is released into Early Access

    The developers behind the challenging puzzle games TIS-100 and SHENZEN I/O are at it again and have released their latest title into Steam’s Early Access today.

  • Open your wallets, there's some great Linux games on sale right now

    It's time to throw your wallet at your screen, as we're going to take a look at some awesome Linux games on sale.

Games: JASEM, openage, Riskers, Rise to Ruins, Slime Rancher

Filed under
Gaming

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

Filed under
Gaming
  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support

    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.

  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month

    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch.

    One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux!

    Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.

  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux

    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'.

    Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.

  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone

    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable.

    Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.

  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support

    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows.

    This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Games: OpenMW and Linux Gaming Benchmark

Filed under
Gaming
  • OpenMW, the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing

    OpenMW [Official Site], the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing with recent blog posts highlighting some changes sounding rather great.

    Speaking on their official blog, the developers noted back in September that they've had some new developers come on board, with thanks in part to the multiplayer "TES3MP" project (Morrowind Multiplayer), which is built from OpenMW.

  • Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X For NVIDIA/Radeon Linux Gaming

    Following last week's look at using the new "Coffee Lake" Intel Core i3 / i5 / i7 CPUs for Linux gaming comparison among our other ongoing tests of these new "8th Gen" processors, a frequent request has been a closer look at the gaming performance between the Core i7 8700K and the Ryzen 7 1800X. Here's a look with two AMD Radeon graphics cards and two NVIDIA GeForce offerings.

Games: Football Manager, Ravenfield, Dying Light, Tower of Time, Immortal Redneck, Let Them Come, DwarfCorp

Filed under
Gaming

Games: OpenRA, Hell Warders, Ubuntu, Fedora and Wine

Filed under
Gaming

Graphics and Games: AMDGPU DC, Vulkan, GOG

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • More Pre-4.15 AMDGPU DC Patches To Test Out This Weekend

    For Radeon RX Vega Linux users or those with newer Radeon GPUs and just wanting to make use of HDMI/DP audio, there are some new "AMDGPU DC" patches ready for testing this weekend.

    While AMDGPU DC is being staged as a pull request finally for Linux 4.15, the work hasn't yet settled down as AMD developers continue taming this massive code-base of more than 120,000 lines of code. Just recently in fact were another 100+ patches for this display code that allows Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting, and other display feature updates long sought after by Radeon users.

  • Vulkan 1.0.63 Introduces Global Priority Support

    Vulkan 1.0.63 is now available as the latest minor update to this high performance graphics/compute API.

    As usual, Vulkan 1.0.63 is mostly made up of document corrections and clarifications. There is though one new extension.

  • Humble Bundle has been acquired by IGN

    This is rather unsettling to see, Humble Bundle has now officially joined with the massive media site IGN.

Games: Forgotten Lore, Heliborne, Grandpa's Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series. VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]
    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.
  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]
    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn
    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.
  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122
    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.
  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?
    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released
    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released
    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements. Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management. Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.