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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Vulkan support for Dota 2 to come next week

    Dota 2 is the first Valve game that will support the new Vulkan API and it could be as soon as next week.

    Considering how early Valve had access to it, and even showed off a demo of it way before release of Vulkan I am still surprise Talos beat it to be the first public Vulkan game. Well, I say surprised, but "Valve Time" is a thing right?

    It's exciting, as when Valve switched to Source 2 which had native OpenGL the performance was much better on Linux (in terms of smoothness and actual FPS figures) and Vulkan is supposed to improve it even more so.

  • OpenRW: An Open-Source, Linux-Friendly Reimplementation Of GTA III

    There is OpenMW as a re-implementation of Morrowind, OpenRA as a re-implementation of Command and Conquer, and many other open-source game projects out there seeking to be free engine re-implementation of popular classic games.

  • OpenRW, an open source engine for Grand Theft Auto III

    I love open source! OpenRW joins the ranks of game engines like OpenMW (Morrowind), OpenRA (Command & Conquer, Red Alert) CorsixTH (Theme Hospital), OpenXcom (X-COM: UFO Defense) and many more.

    It's early days for the project, but I have high hopes that it will join the ranks of many other playable and open source game engines.

    [...]

    Find OpenRW on github. It's licensed under the GPL.

  • Overfall, the awesome mix of adventure, RPG and strategy is now fully released and available for Linux

    I have a real soft spot for Overfall, it looks simple, but it has some really engaging gameplay with it mixing up a few different styles. The Linux version works really well too.

    What I especially like is the developers including a monitor picker in the games options, that was really useful for me as a dual-monitor user.

  • CRYPTARK, the fantastic 2D sci-fi roguelike shooter has a massive update with a co-op option

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • First Steps with OpenVR and the Vive on Linux

    First up, if you're looking for my upcoming Vive unboxing video, this isn't it!

    When my Vive arrived earlier this month, I'd decided to let it sit in its box for a while. The most recent communication regarding official support was "We are working on it but it's not ready yet," and I had a lot of other work to focus on.

    About a month ago, an OSVR contributor had mentioned in the OpenHMD IRC channel that OSVR had a driver that interfaced with Valve's Vive driver and allowed OSVR to support the Vive under Linux. I didn't have time to look into it, but was glad to know that even if Linux support wasn't being advertised as ready by Valve, that there was something tangible to work with.

    The Vive's official launch came and went without advertised Linux support and it seemed that those users who did have Vives hadn't managed to jump through the correct hoops to get it functioning on Linux until last night when Linux user and developer SketchStick nudged me to take a look at some successes he'd had.

  • Shadwen, the new stealth game from Frozenbyte has released with day 1 Linux support

    Shadwen the brand new action and stealth game from Frozenbyte is now officially available. I can't wait to give it a go.

    I have requested review codes, so I will have to wait and see if Frozenbyte reply on that. Samsai has a copy so hopefully he will livestream it for you guys on Friday.
    Update: Frozenbyte have given me a copy. Thoughts to come when I've put time into it.

    It's nice to see Frozenbyte do something a bit different after Trine, so hopefully it's as good as it looks.

  • Frozenbyte's Shadwen Launches, Recommends NVIDIA Proprietary Driver On Linux
  • Hearts of Iron IV officially up for pre-order and will feature Linux support, releases June 6th

    Paradox fans may want to know that Hearts of Iron IV is officially available to pre-order and there's a trailer.

    It will release on June 6th with a basic price of £34.99 for the smallest edition available right up to £67.99.

    I've not played any of the previous games (which don't have Linux support), so I look forward to seeing what all the fuss is about. I am sure quite a number of people are excited by having this on Linux.

  • Unreal Tournament on Linux, checking up on the progress by Epic Games and how to get it running on Linux

    For those that don't know, or forgot, the new Unreal Tournament does in fact have a Linux version. I check on it now and then and it's really starting to come together.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

How to get gaming on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Gaming on Linux has never been better. With over 1,500 games available on Steam alone that support Ubuntu (officially 12.04 LTS and many other distros, unofficially), the breadth of games that you can get on Linux is astonishing: from casual card games and puzzles for whiling away a few hours, to indie games that might be low on budget but are high on inventiveness, and even big budget 'AAA' games are now available.

5 of the most popular Linux gaming distros

Games are also beginning to run better than ever on Linux distros now that many game engines used by some of the biggest names in the gaming industry – such as the powerful CryEngine – have native Linux support.

Gamers switching from the more demanding Windows 10 OS to Linux can also see performance increases, as their system won't have to devote as much of its resources to background processes and instead concentrate on delivering the best gaming experience possible.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Heroes of Loot 2 dungeon crawler released in Early Access with Linux support

    Heroes of Loot 2 from Orangepixel has released today in Steam's Early Access section. I wasn't a fan of the original, but it looks like the developer may have been able to hook my interest this time around.

  • Blueprint Tycoon has left Early Access, a clever and weird simulation game that supports Linux & SteamOS

    I love Tycoon styled games and Blueprint Tycoon is a weird entry. I mean that in a nice way, as it's great to see some innovation.

    I have yet to play it myself, so this is more of an announcement post in case you haven't seen it before. It's highly rated so far which means it's going on my wishlist to check out sometime.

  • Rocket Fist arena battle game released with Linux & SteamOS support

    Rocket Fist is an indie arena battle game that has just released on Linux, I took a lot thanks to the developer sending in keys.

    I have to say, I enjoyed this game far more than I thought I would. There's something satisfying about being a little robot firing fists around and bumping into other robots.

    Bouncing your fists off walls and have it smash into multiple enemy robots at once is really quite fun. It's an ingenious game and I can imagine it being hilarious at parties on a Steam Machine.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more