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Gaming

Games: Geneshift, Corpse Party, Stellaris, OpenMW

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Gaming

Games: Steam, Cattails, Tempest, OpenMW

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Gaming
  • 30 Best Linux Games On Steam You Should Play in 2017

    When it comes to Gaming, a system running on Windows platform is what anyone would recommend. It still is a superior choice for gamers with better graphics driver support and perfect hardware compatibility. But, what about the thought of gaming on a Linux system? Well, yes, of course – it is possible – maybe you thought of it at some point in time but the collection of Linux games on Steam for Linux platform wasn’t appealing at all few years back.

  • Cattails is a very sweet and relaxing game, here's some thoughts

    Now that Cattails [Steam, Official Site], the animal simulation RPG is out in the wild I've managed to take a look, here's some thoughts.

  • A lot later than expected, but the open-world pirate RPG 'Tempest' is now in Beta for Linux

    I covered Tempest [Steam, Official Site] a couple times in the past, with the developer saying last year it would come to Linux. This open-world pirate RPG is now here with a Beta.

  • OpenMW 0.43 Continues Advancing Open-Source Morrowind For Linux

    OpenMW remains as the open-source game engine project re-implementing the code to power Elderscrolls III: Morrowind, the popular 2002 RPG game from Bethesda. OpenMW 0.43 is now available as the latest release.

    OpenMW 0.43 has implemented more engine functionality including rain/snow effects, AI improvements, new options, and implementing other previously missing features. There was also a lot of work on OpenMW-CS as the content development tool built by this open-source project.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming

Games: Polyball, Parkitect, Seven: The Days Long Gone, and Impact of Steam in China

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Gaming

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Armory Is A Very Promising 3D Game Engine With Full Blender Integration

    Armory is a promising open-source game engine that prides itself in being built around Blender.

    The Armory 3D game engine offers complete Blender integration for essentially being able to build games in full via Blender. Armory also relies upon the Kha multimedia framework and Haxe tool-kit for delivering a cross-platform and performant experience. The renderer for this engine is based on Blender's Cycles nodes and is physically-based, supports an HDR pipeline, and can handle other modern 3D features.

  • Humble Bundle have some interesting deals going on for Linux gamers

    It seems Humble Bundle are doing some interesting deals Linux gamers might want to be aware of right now.

  • Steam Linux Usage For November: 0.27%

    Valve is reporting the Linux gaming marketshare for November 2017 at a mere 0.27%.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming

Games: MAME, GOG, Godot, and Rich Geldreich

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Gaming
  • MAME Emulator Now Supports Oriental Legend 2 and Knights of Valour 2 New Legend

    MAME, the open-source and cross-platform computer emulator software, has been updated this week to version 0.192, a release that incorporates support for new systems and games.

    One of the most important changes of the MAME 0.192 release appears to be the progress done so far for the IGS PGM2 software, which will excite lots of arcade fans. This was possible thanks to a newly built FPGA-based rig that allowed the devs to dump the internal programs from the ARM CPUs for the Knights of Valour 2 New Legend and Oriental Legend 2 games.

  • GOG now have Epic Pinball and the platformer Jazz Jackrabbit with Linux support

    GOG have revived some more classic games today as they have released Epic Pinball: The Complete Collection and Jazz Jackrabbit Collection which have Linux support.

  • Godot 3.0 Game Engine Reaches Beta

    Development on the Godot 3.0 game engine has been happening for the better part of two years while today it reached its much anticipated beta milestone that also marks the feature freeze for this open-source game engine release.

  • Dev snapshot: Godot 3.0 beta 1

    Godot 3.0's development officially entered the beta stage last week, which coincides for us with what we name the feature freeze: from now on, no new features will be merged in the master branch, as the focus will be fully on fixing existing issues to stabilize the current feature set. Don't worry though, Godot 3.1 will arrive soon after the 3.0 release to bring all the nice features that contributors are already working on.

  • Rich Geldreich On The Concerns Of Open-Sourcing In The Game Industry

    Former Valve developer Rich Geldreich who was responsible for a lot of the Linux/OpenGL work at Valve in the earlier days of Linux gaming and who has also spent time at Unity, Microsoft, and other companies before starting his own consulting firm, has second thoughts about open-sourcing in the game industry.

Lakka 2.1 Linux Operating System Will Turn Your PC into a Retro Gaming Console

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Gaming

Based on the latest LibreELEC 8.2 embedded Linux operating system, Lakka 2.1 uses the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel for the Allwinner images and the Linux 4.4.99 LTS kernel for Rockchip images. It supports S812 Amlogic TV boxes, improves HDMI audio for WeTek Play 2 systems, and fixes boot arguments of Odroid-XU3 and Odroid-XU4.

"We now have completely new builds for Allwinner boards, based on the mainline kernel and u-boot. With this new project, we can support many new boards with very little efforts. Being based on a recent kernel increase compatibility with newer joypads and dongles. These new images will replace the a10, a20, H3 and Bananapi images," reads the release announcement.

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Games: Black Mirror, Radline, Dominions, Albion Online

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Gaming

Games: Cutthroat, Son of Scoregasm, Failed State, GemRB

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
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  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
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  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, K

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.