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Gaming

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

GNOME Games 3.18: A New App To Organize Your Linux Games

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Gaming

There's a new GNOME application called Games -- not to be confused with the few GNOME games out there like Sudoku and Solitaire. GNOME Games is not a game itself but intended as a tool for managing your game library.

GNOME Games is trying to be a consistent way to access all your games on a Linux system whether they be games installed by Steam, games installed from your package manager, video game console ROMs, web-based games, and other gaming formats. For some games -- like those supporting the Libretro API -- it then tries to offer a bit of integration for managing the game.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Report: Valve is messing about with some ‘Linux compatible’ games on Steam

    According to several reports on Gaming on Linux, Valve has been removing icons for “Linux compatible” games that don’t work 100-hundred percent perfectly with its Steam OS. Linux users who want to download those games cannot download these games even if they don’t use Steam OS, according to the report. This move follows a move Valve made in May of this year when it replaced the familiar “Tux” Linux mascot icon and replaced it with Steam OS icons. Those Linux users who have already purchased games that are “Linux compatible” can still install and play those games despite them being removed…

  • Divinity: Original Sin Enhanced Edition hitting consoles and Linux next week

    Divinity: Original Sin Enhanced Edition has been enormously popular since it hit PC and Mac last year and deservedly so – it’s a fantastic game. Now Larian Studios have announced when PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Linux gamers will be able to get their Source Hunting on – October 27th. Although it hasn’t been confirmed, this is also when we PC and Mac gamers are likely to get the free update containing the Enhanced Edition‘s content and upgrades.

  • Dungeons & Dragons-based Sword Coast Legends out today on Linux, PC, Mac

    As previously reported, it’s a classic top-down RPG in the same vein as Baldur’s Gate and similar titles, only with the ability to ruin your friends’ good time by acting as Dungeon Master.

    The PC, Mac, and Linux title contains a real-time Dungeon Master mode, which like the table-top version of D&D, allows the DM to guide players through customizable adventures. Rather than focusing on typical of 4v1 games, the DM mode “encourages DMs to engage and empower their players” but they can be rather brutal if it suits them.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Pre-orders open for DragonBox Pyra Linux handheld game console

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

The DragonBox Pyra is a handheld gaming device aimed at a very specific niche: folks looking for a versatile, open source machine that can run desktop Linux apps and emulate game consoles including the PlayStation 1 and PlayStation Portable and the Nintendo 64 and Gameboy DS.

It’s been in development for a few years, but now you can finally pre-order a DragonBox Pyra… kind of.

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Valve puling Linux games from Steam that fail to meet SteamOS standards - report

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Gaming

Valve has removed its SteamOS icon from a batch of Linux-compatible games on Steam, which has reportedly resulted in Linux players no longer having the option to download said titles.

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Steam Controllers Don't Work in Ubuntu, Here's What You Need to Do

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Gaming

The Steam Controllers have started to ship to gamers across the world, and some people are already using them to play games. Unfortunately, the Steam Controllers don't work by default with Ubuntu, but there is a workaround in place.

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Steam’s living room hardware blitz gets off to a muddy start

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Gaming

Valve didn’t give itself an easy job when it publicly announced its decision, over two years ago now, to bring the PC gaming experience to the living room TV. Plenty of companies have tried, and most never even got off the ground (see the Infinium Phantom for just one high-profile failure). But Valve is perhaps better positioned for success than any past effort, with a deep understanding of the PC gaming market and a deeply entrenched, market-leading distribution platform in Steam.

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More in Tux Machines

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today. And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking? Read more

A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps

  • Good Game: A switch to Android not as difficult as anticipated
    It’s not quite like learning a new language or how to ride a bike, but at times it does feel a little bit like both. After nearly 10 years of faithful Apple consumption — listening to iTunes, watching an Apple TV, reading iBooks — I did something completely unexpected this month: I made the leap from the neatly walled garden of Apple’s smartphone, smart watch and tablet and into the wilds of the loosely controlled world of Android gadgets. I could blame the change on a variety of must-need wearable, quasi-smart doodads, or virtual reality, or even an edge-to-edge screened smartphone that looks like you’re carrying a piece of the sky around in your pocket. But the real culprit for my leap of consumer faith isn’t one single Samsung product; it was an ecosystem of them.
  • The 50 Essential Android Apps (2017)

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.