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Gaming

The Free Game Lag

Filed under
Gaming

fsf.org: There is one category of software that many see as being unsustainable as free software: Free video games have lagged behind other areas of free software, and the reasons behind this are fairly simple.

New Linux Game Store 'Gameolith' Launches with 5 Indie Titles

Filed under
Gaming
  • New Linux Game Store 'Gameolith' Launches with 5 Indie Titles
  • Duke Nukem Forever sold 376,000 units in the US in June
  • Can Minecraft Change the Gaming Industry?
  • Blocks that Matter tech demo out
  • Beep Released

The Open Game License: A case study in open source markets

Filed under
Gaming

techrepublic.com: The history of the roleplaying game industry in general, and the Dungeons and Dragons game in particular, serves as an interesting case study in the relative benefits of openness in business models.

SpaceChem in USC

Filed under
Gaming
  • SpaceChem – Now on the Ubuntu Software Center!
  • A Playable Tech Demo is Out for Linux Game 'Blocks That Matter'
  • Those Birds Sure Are Pissed
  • 0 A.D. Alpha 6 Fortuna

Gameolith Announced Launch Titles

Filed under
Gaming
  • Gameolith Announced Launch Titles
  • Popular Board Game Memoir '44 Comes to Linux
  • New 'Molten Sky' Teaser Video Shows Helicopter Campaign
  • Puzzle Moppet for Free?

Linux Gaming: OpenClonk

Filed under
Gaming
  • Linux Gaming: OpenClonk
  • 0 A.D. Alpha 6 Fortuna Presents Some Summer Fun
  • GMines 0.2 Released
  • Minecraft Adventure Notes
  • 30th Anniversary of Donkey Kong
  • From C++ to HTML5: Opera ports game with web standards

Friday Fun: Minecraft

Filed under
Gaming

linuxjournal.com: This week's game is one that isn't free. In any sense. It is closed source, and requires payment to even try it out. Why would we mention such a game here at Linux Journal?

A first look at: The Platform Shooter

Filed under
Gaming

openbytes.wordpress: After navigating the functional yet self explanatory menu’s, the game throws you into a world reminiscent of two retro titles, the first one being Mission Impossible with its platform/shoot-em-up genre, the second being its style of graphics which for me put me instantly in mind of Another World.

'No Time To Explain'

Filed under
Gaming
  • 'No Time To Explain', New Indie Game Coming Soon to Linux
  • A Linux Port is in Works for Action Game 'Garshasp'
  • 10 Popular Real Time Strategy(RTS) Games for Linux
  • Interview with Keith Poole from Desura Part 3

Suite of educational games for children - Childsplay

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Gaming

linuxpoison.blogspot: Childsplay is a fun and save way to let young children use the computer and at the same time teach them a little math, letters of the alphabets, spelling, eye-hand coordination etc.

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