Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

  • Our 2016 Linux Game Picks

    We decided not to call this the top 10 best Linux games of 2016, because that would suggest we can have an informed opinion about every little game that was released in the past 11~12 months – and that would be just wrong, as our time is limited and there is no way we could have enough time to play most titles out there for Linux.

    So we will focus on what we thought was great based on what we had time to play. There won’t be any particular order (who cares), so don’t assume the first one or the last one is our top 1 pick or something. Alright, let’s go through our picks then.

  • OpenMW 0.41 Continues Re-Implementing Elderscrolls III: Morrowind

    OpenMW 0.41 was released today as the newest version of this open-source game project working to re-implement the game engine found within Elderscrolls III: Morrowind.

    OpenMW 0.41 implements more capabilities such as particle textures for spell effects, AI combat improvements, support for water rendering in OpenMW-CS, and much more. OpenMW 0.41 also has dozens of bug-fixes.

  • Denuvo Spins Doom Dropping Its DRM Into A Victory Dance

    The speed with which the prevailing opinion of Denuvo, the DRM unicorn de jour, has changed has been nearly enough to make one's head spin. It was only at the start of 2016 that the software was being rolled out en masse by many game publishers, leading some normally bombastic cracking groups to predict that the video game industry had finally found its final solution to piracy. That lasted until roughly the middle months of the year, when several games using the DRM were cracked. While Denuvo's makers remained fairly silent, the opinion of it shifted from "final solution" to "hey, it's still the hardest DRM to crack." Cracking groups that typically measure their work in weeks were finding cracking Denuvo to be a project measured in months. That likely explained why so many big-ticket games still used it. Until, somewhat suddenly, multiple big-name games began dropping Denuvo from their code via patches and updates. The latest example of this was Doom silently nixing Denuvo, with id Software not even referencing the move in its patch notes.

    And so the speculation began as to what was going on. Some said the game makers were finally realizing that DRM is pretty much useless at everything other than being a minor inconvenience for cracking groups and a major inconvenience for many legitimate customers. Others suggested that perhaps Denuvo offered some kind of money-back deal if a game using it was cracked within a certain time-frame. Still others claimed that publishers were only using the DRM during the initial release window of the game to protect it during the most crucial sales period, and then dropping it afterwards.

  • Linux Gaming Was Great In 2016, But 2017 Should Be Even Better

    Most of you will probably agree that 2016 was the best year yet for Linux gaming with having a ton of new game releases, several of which were AAA game titles, the premiere of Vulkan is an important step for the future, Valve working on Linux VR efforts, and the Linux graphics drivers getting into better shape for handling the next era of Linux games.

    While 2016 was great, some of you may have been let down by still the relatively minor amount of AAA games making their way to Linux especially on a quick turnaround time to the Windows game releases. There are also some that may have felt letdown by the relatively minor movements around Steam Machines and SteamOS this calendar year, the Steam Linux gaming percentage being around 1% or less, Linux VR support not yet up to scratch, some Linux game ports still performing significantly lower than their Windows ports, etc.

  • DOOM 2016 on Ubuntu Linux via Wine (Vulkan on GTX 1070)

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unigine 2.4 Will Bring Yet More Graphical Improvements To This Linux-Friendly Engine

    Unigine Corp is preparing their next major Unigine 2 engine update, Unigine 2.4. This should be another exciting update while unfortunately their new technology demo isn't making it out in time for Christmas.

    Their new Unigine "superstition" / "classroom" technology demo built off Unigine 2 is a huge advancement over Unigine Heaven/Valley. Unigine Superstition is built off Unigine 2, features VR support, and offers a ton of rich graphical improvements while still being Linux-friendly. While it was supposed to arrive this year, Unigine Corp recently delayed it until Q1'17. But let me tell you, the delay should certainly be worthwhile and this new demo is absolutely gorgeous.

  • Mesa's RADV Vulkan Driver Receives Some Fixes For DOOM

    Red Hat developer Dave Airlie spent some of his Christmas committing some fixes to the open-source RADV Radeon Vulkan driver for benefiting id Software's DOOM game with Vulkan renderer.

  • The art of cutting edge, Doom 2 vs the modern Security Industry

    During the holiday, I started playing Doom 2. I bet I’ve not touched this game in more than ten years. I can't even remember the last time I played it. My home directory was full of garbage and it was time to clean it up when I came across doom2.wad. I’ve been carrying this file around in my home directory for nearly twenty years now. It’s always there like an old friend you know you can call at any time, day or night. I decided it was time to install one of the doom engines and give it a go. I picked prboom, it’s something I used a long time ago and doesn’t have any fancy features like mouselook or jumping. Part of the appeal is to keep the experience close to the original. Plus if you could jump a lot of these levels would be substantially easier. The game depends on not having those features.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Get your dancing shoes, as Crypt of the NecroDancer: AMPLIFIED DLC is on its way

    Crypt of the NecroDancer: AMPLIFIED [Official Site] is the first gameplay DLC for the roguelike rhythm game and it sounds great.

  • Some thoughts on Age of Conquest IV

    Back when I started using Linux full time around 2007, there were two game genres that were well represented: fast action multiplayer oriented first-person shooters in the Quake mould and Risk derivatives. Mostly made in Java, games like Lux Delux and Aevum Obscurum were notable for their presence on a platform that had yet to be embraced by major game distributors. After Desura launched for Linux in 2011, I finally gave one of these games a try in the form of Age of Conquest III.

  • Some Of The Popular Gaming Platforms For Linux

    Online gaming is becoming something of a standard and there quite a few options available for those in the Linux universe. Some are more popular than others but there is nothing wrong in knowing the alternatives as you can check availability from amongst them or compare pricing. So let's look at some of the popular gaming platforms on Linux.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

More Games

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.  

Google: VR180, Android and the Asus Chromebook Flip C101