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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • SteamOS 2.64 Released with Vulkan-Powered Nvidia Driver, Debian 8.3 Updates

    It would appear that Valve has pushed the 2.64 build of its Debian-based SteamOS gaming-oriented operating system to the stable channel, after being in Beta for the last few weeks or so.

    The stable SteamOS 2.64 update includes mostly the same improvements that we reported on two weeks ago, when the build was pushed by Valve's engineers to the brewmaster_beta channel for public testing, such as the updated Nvidia video driver, version 355.00.28, with support for the new Vulkan API.

  • Opinion: Game Nearly Over

    So here’s the news: Microsoft is forcing game developers and game developing companies through the hoop of their app store, encroaching on their revenue and putting itself in the way of dealing directly with the customers. Why am I not in the least bit surprised?

    [...]

    Here’s a thought: If the industry had diversified the platforms they targeted earlier on, say in the mid-2000s, when Linux was starting to come into its own, maybe this situation could’ve been avoided. Yes, marketshare, library support, drivers, hardware support, and so one, were not ideal on Linux back in the day. But we have seen how things can be turned around, right? We have an example in living memory of how, how by unilaterally nurturing a rich ecosystem of apps, you can get users to adopt a new platform. And with a healthy amount of users, developing for the new guys, even developing drivers, suddenly becomes a sound business strategy for third parties. Yes, it is circular reasoning: more apps attract more users and more users attract more apps (which attract more users), but that is how Android became top dog in the mobile app arena.

  • SteamOS stable updated to 2.64, brings Vulkan to the stable users

    For those not keeping track: SteamOS was recently updated to include the changes from the recent 2.64 beta and it brings Vulkan for Nvidia amongst other changes.

    The only game actually using Vulkan on Linux/SteamOS right now is The Talos Principle from Croteam, but the beta doesn't currently work on SteamOS directly.

  • IndieGameStand blog post on Steam key reselling, plus my thoughts
  • I played American Truck Simulator on Linux, don't ever let me drive a real truck

    American Truck Simulator arrived on Linux day one, which is fantastic, and I was eventually sent over a key by SCS directly to check it out.

    It’s really not all that different to Euro Truck Simulator 2, with the same engine and the same issues. I will start with the issues to get them out of the way.

  • Humble Jumbo Bundle 6 Brings Four Superb Games to Linux Users

    Hooray! Hooray! Attention, Linux gamers from all over the web, there's a new Humble Bundle available that lets you buy up to seven superb, cross-platform games on the cheap, four of them being Linux-ready.

    Humble Jumbo Bundle 6 is now live (click and buy now, read later), and if you've subscribed to their list of announcements, you could have probably already received the great news we want to share with you today.

  • Valve Pushes New Stable Steam Client with Steam Overlay Support for Vulkan Games

    Today, March 8, Valve just pushed a new Steam Client stable update to Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux users, bringing all the changes that have been implemented in the Beta stages of development, and much more.

  • Wine-Staging 1.9.5 Brings Improvements For Older Windows Games On Linux

    Similar to Wine-Staging 1.9.3 that brought better support for older Windows games, Wine-Staging 1.9.5 has continued that trend in allowing Wine to better handle running Windows games on Linux and other supported operating systems.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

MAME becomes FOSS

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OSS
Gaming
  • 10 months later, MAME finishes its transition to open source

    Almost a year after the folks who maintain the Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator or (MAME) said they would make the project completely open source, they've declared the transition a success.

    MAME is seen by many developers to be the foremost emulator of arcade games, and while MAME source code has long been freely available for use, it hasn't technically been open source.

  • MAME is now Free and Open Source Software

    After 19 years, MAME is now available under an OSI-compliant and FSF-approved license! Many thanks to all of the contributors who helped this to go as smoothly as possible!

    We have spent the last 10 months trying to contact all people that contributed to MAME as developers and external contributors and get information about desired license. We had limited choice to 3 that people already had dual-license MAME code with.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Steam for Linux User Is Still Under 1%

    The Steam Hardware & Software Survey: February 2016 has been made public, and it looks like the Linux platform hasn't managed to get over the 1% hurdle.

    The number of Linux Steam users has been keeping steady at the same level for the last few months, just below 1%, and it looks like not much changed for the month of February. We were hoping to see Linux usage growing from month to month, but that is not happening.

  • Looks like Homefront: The Revolution might not have a day-1 Linux release

    Sad news, as Deep Silver originally confirmed to me Homefront: The Revolution was going to be a day-1 release, now they are saying when.

  • America's Army Is Still Getting Ready For Linux

    Last summer we reported on America's Army being ported to Linux and that it was trailing the renewed Mac OS X port. Today is some new information on America's Army coming to Linux.

    While it's been several months since last hearing anything about America's Army for Linux, I heard this morning from the team that the game just very recently got the game compiling and running on Linux after being faced by some delays. While it's working, it will still take some time before it's ready for external testing, but they are now putting more effort into their Linux and Mac ports.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • New Doom Game Runs Great in Linux with Wine, Users Report

    A new Doom game is being released by Bethesda and id Software, and it seems to be working great with Wine in Linux.

    When new titles are launched on the Windows platform, it usually takes a while for Wine to catch up. Most of the time, there are missing libraries or some other form error, which means that, at best, the game can be installed and not played.

    The Wine developers and community are usually quick to fix any issues, especially with big games, but it's very likely that it won't be necessary. A Linux user managed to get the latest Doom Alpha running in Wine with little to no effort.

  • Microsoft's latest tactics show Gabe Newell of Valve was right to worry

    Gabe Newell from Valve was quite right to fear about the future when he starting talking up Linux, and now it looks like Microsoft will be trying to push their own store even more.

  • That Dragon, Cancer now available on Linux & SteamOS

    That Dragon, Cancer is now officially available on Linux & SteamOS. An immersive, narrative videogame that retells Joel Green’s 4-year fight against cancer through about two hours of poetic, imaginative gameplay that explores themes of faith, hope and love.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Deponia Doomsday: initial thoughts and early review

    Out of nowhere, Daedalic decided to release a sequel to their most popular (and often divisive) point-and-click game series Deponia, announcing it just a week before release to the surprise of many. Those who played the original trilogy will know that it ended very definitively and was intended to be a trilogy with a clear beginning, middle and end. Similarly, the ending drew a bit of criticism and left fans hungry for more, so despite being an unexpected surprise, a sequel also makes perfect sense.

  • Overfall, an exploration strategy game released for SteamOS & Linux, some thoughts

    I had a chance to take a look at Overfall, a very interesting mix of rogue-like exploration, RPG and strategy mechanics wrapped up in a funny looking shell.

  • Trulon: The Shadow Engine RPG released for Linux & SteamOS

    I am happy to say that the Linux version seems to work really well, one minor graphical glitch and that's all I've noticed. Turn off Bloom, and you will have a better experience.

  • Want to see the very popular Stardew Valley on Linux? There's a chance

    Stardew Valley from ConcernedApe and Chucklefish is a big hit right now, and it's possible it could come to Linux without enough of a push from Linux gamers.

  • Linux Gaming Marketshare Regressed So Far 2016

    While more Steam Linux games continue to appear, the overall market-share still hasn't been trending upwards in the Linux battle against Windows and OS X.

    The Steam 2016 January statistics showed the Linux gaming marketshare regressing on a percentage basis and that was carried over to February. The February 2016 Steam survey results are now available and it doesn't show the Linux gaming market-share as a percentage improving at all.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Vendetta Online 1.8.371 3D Space Combat Game Re-Adds the Furie-Related Missions

    Guild Software had the great pleasure of announcing this past weekend the general availability of yet another maintenance release in the Vendetta Online 1.8 series of the popular and cross-platform MMORPG game.

  • We Are The Dwarves, a real-time tactical adventure now on Linux, some thoughts

    Today I took a look at We Are The Dwarves on Linux. It looks good and I love these games, but is it any good?

  • Spring RTS Open-Source Engine 101.0 Released

    Spring RTS 101.0 has been released with performance improvements, bug fixes, and new features.

    Spring RTS 101.0 brings support for custom shaders and map drawing via Lua scripting, line of sight refactoring, refactoring of transports, an internal pr-downloader, and a ton of fixes.

  • There Are Now 1,900 Steam Linux Games Available For Download

    As of this evening on Steam, there are 1,900 released games available for download with native Linux support.

    After a recent Steam change, there were more than 1,900 Steam Linux games listed as Valve ended up including yet-to-be-released Linux game ports. That total including unreleased Linux games is now up to 2,009! But in terms of released Linux game titles available for download right now, the 1,900 threshold was crossed tonight to end out February.

  • XWayland Gains Partial XvidMode Support To Run Older Linux Games

    The latest X.Org Server code's XWayland support path now is able to run some older Linux games.

    Landing within the X.Org Server Git code-base is partial xvidmode extension support for XWayland, for running older Linux games that lack native Wayland support, such as those making use of SDL1. The work was done by Red Hat's Olivier Fourdan.

  • American Truck Simulator On Linux

    Another year, another simulation game from S.C.S Software. I should preface this article by saying I am not usually a fan of simulation game-- whether they be truck, plane, bus, or anything else. That being said... I might be a convert after this.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Licensing: Facebook Responds to Licence Complaints, Cloud Native Open Source License Choices Analysed

  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects.
  • Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js
    Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.
  • Cloud Native Open Source License Choices
    One of the most common questions regarding open source licensing today concerns trajectories. Specifically, what are the current directions of travel both for specific licenses as well as license types more broadly. Or put more simply, what licenses are projects using today, and how is that changing? We’ve examined this data several times, most recently in this January look at the state of licensing based on Black Duck’s dataset. That data suggested major growth for permissive licenses, primarily at the expense of reciprocal alternatives. The Apache and MIT licenses, for example, were up 10% and 21% respectively, while the GPL was down 27%. All of this is on a relative share basis, of course: the “drop” doesn’t reflect relicensing of existing projects, but less usage relative to its peers. [...] One such community with enough of a sample size to be relevant is the one currently forming around the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Founded in 2015 with the Kubernetes project as its first asset, the Foundation has added eleven more open source projects, all of which are licensed under the same Apache 2 license. But as a successful Foundation is only a part of the broader ecosystem, the real question is what are the licensing preferences of the Cloud Native projects and products outside of the CNCF itself. [...] Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the influence of the CNCF itself, Apache strongly outperforms all other licenses, showing far greater relative adoption than it has in more generalized datasets such as the Black Duck survey. Overall in this dataset, approximately 64% of projects are covered by the Apache license. No other project has greater than a 12% share. The only other licenses above 10%, in fact, are the GPL at 12% and MIT at 11%. After that, the other projects are all 5% or less.

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?