Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Godot Engine 2.1 Released, Focuses On Usability Improvements

    Version 2.1 of the Godot Engine, a cross-platform 2D/3D game engine that was opened up back in 2014, is now available.

    Godot 2.1 development was focused around usability improvements in large part. The project's release announcement explained, "This release marks the conclusion of a series focusing on usability improvements. We have listened to and worked with our awesome community to make Godot one of the easiest game development environments to use. Our goal is and will always be to aim for the top in the ease of use vs power ratio."

  • Godot reaches 2.1 stable!

    After almost six months of hard work, we are proudly presenting you the marvellous Godot Engine 2.1. Just like 2.0, this version focuses almost exclusively on further improving usability and the editor interface.

    This release marks the conclusion of a series focusing on usability improvements. We have listened to and worked with our awesome community to make Godot one of the easiest game development environments to use. Our goal is and will always be to aim for the top in the ease of use vs power ratio.

  • Vendetta Online 1.8.384 Adds New Voice Chat Commands, VR Improvements

    Guild Software announced a new maintenance update for their popular Vendetta Online MMORPG (Massive Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) title, version 1.8.384, for all supported platforms.

    According to the release notes, Vendetta Online 1.8.384 is a small update that only introduces a /voicegroup set of commands designed to allow players to create random Voice Chat channels supporting up to 32 users. The /voicegroup command set is similar to the /group command set, and to learn how to use it simply type /voicegroup.

  • Arma 3 Linux beta has been updated

    This is version 1.58, so it's not currently as up to date as the Windows version. This means you won't be able to play online with your Windows pals just yet unless they are using the same version.

    It looks like this version now has BattlEye anti-cheat enabled for Linux gamers, so at least we can play on servers using it now.

  • How to fix bodies not showing in Shadow of Mordor with Nvidia drivers temp fix
  • Super Crate Box, GUN GODZ & Serious Sam: The Random Encounter to come to Linux

    Vlambeer have written up a blog post detailing what they have been up to recently and the news is good for us. Super Crate Box (freeware), GUN GODZ (freeware) & Serious Sam: The Random Encounter (Steam) will all get updates which include Linux support.

  • The Great Whale Road developers are looking for a small amount of Linux testers

    The Great Whale Road developers posted on their forum that they are looking for a small group of testers to help with dependencies and troubleshooting.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Steam and KDE on FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD
Gaming
  • Script Makes It Easy To Deploy Steam On FreeBSD

    With a new script, it's possible to get Valve's Steam Linux game client running relatively well on FreeBSD.

    On FreeBSD in conjunction with its Linux binary compatibility layer it's possible to run Steam for handling your favorite Steam Linux titles. If you are unfamiliar with FreeBSD's Linux compatibility layer, see FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?. That article has background information along with some Linux vs. FreeBSD gaming benchmarks I did five years ago... When FreeBSD 11.0 is out, I'll try again to get it working to see how FreeBSD 11 performs for running Linux native games.

  • Time flies for FBSD updates, too

    The older KDE stuff — that is, KDE4, which is still the current official release for the desktop on FreeBSD — is also maintained, although (obviously) not much changes there. We did run into a neat C++-exceptions bug recently, which was kind of hard to trigger: running k3b (or ksoundconverter and some other similar ones) with a CD that is unknown to MusicBrainz would crash k3b. There’s not that many commercially-available CDs unknown to that database, so I initially brushed off the bug report as Works For Me.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Audacious 3.8 Beta 1 Released, Available In PPA

    Audacious 3.8 beta 1 was released a couple of days ago and is available in the WebUpd8 Unstable PPA. The new version brings support for running multiple Audacious instances, a new plugin for the Qt interface, and various other improvements and bug fixes.

  • Total System Backup and Recall with Déjà Dup

    You will be hard pressed to find an easier, more reliable backup GUI for Linux than Déjà Dup. Although it might not have all the flexibility of some of its command-line counterparts, it is a solution that anyone can depend upon. Install it and schedule a regular backup of your important data...and hope that you never have to use (but rest assured it’s there).

  • RcppStreams 0.1.1

    A maintenance release of RcppStreams is now on CRAN. RcppStreams brings the excellent Streamulus C++ template library for event stream processing to R.

    Streamulus, written by Irit Katriel, uses very clever template meta-programming (via Boost Fusion) to implement an embedded domain-specific event language created specifically for event stream processing.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.16 is now available.

  • New Commercial Wine Interface CrossOver Brings Impoved Support For Windows Apps
  • GCC 6.2 Is Coming Quite Soon

    Version 6.2 of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is expected to come quite soon.

    This is important as GCC 6.2 is the first point release to the stable GCC6 compiler under the versioning scheme they rolled out last year: GCC 6.0 was development, GCC 6.1 was the first stable release, and GCC 6.2 is now the first point release. That's important since a number of distribution vendors tend to wait until around this first point release before incorporating a major new version of the GCC compiler.

  • The GNU C Library version 2.24 is now available
  • This Is the Police released for Linux, some thoughts on this intriguing strategy and adventure game

    The only thing I don't like is the checkpoint save system. You don't get to save the game whenever you like. It appears each day is a new save. I always get frustrated by checkpoint-only saves, so that's the only mark against the game in my personal opinion.

  • Classic Disney games, Transport Fever, and more Linux gaming news
  • Total War: Warhammer Heading To Mac & Linux

    Announced through a press release that was sent over earlier today, Total War: Warhammer will be heading towards both Mac and Linux later this year. The video game is developed by Creative Assembly in partnership with Games Workshop where gamers can expect a turn-based campaign filled with real-time battles.

Disney on GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unigine 2.3 Improves Screen-Space Raytraced Reflections

    The visually stunning and longtime Linux-friendly Unigine Engine is up to version 2.3 with a number of new features.

    Unigine 2.3 rolls out HTC Vive VR support, round earth support, a completely redesigned landscape tool, the meatlness workflow enabled by default, improved screen-space raytraced reflections, improved GGX mipmaps, parallax depth cutout, configurable TAA, water improvements, and more.

  • Near Death patch released, has an amusing bit for Linux gamers

    Personally I think it's a very cool game and I am looking forward to spending more time with it soon! If I don't find that damn penguin I'm going to cry a little inside.

  • The Fall Part 2: Unbound To Land Early 2017 & Part 1 Updated For Linux

    Before digging into the juicy news, I'd like to take a moment to note that last week we were finally able to get The Fall's Linux builds updated, bringing Linux users into sync with Windows and Mac users, and making new features like developer commentary available across all platforms.

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Unity, Mir, and Snapd

  • Ubuntu Touch Q&A 23
    The developers have been hard at work on Xenial! ARM64 now working on Ubuntu Touch, and applications launch! As many modern CPUs don't include 32-bit compatibility mode, ARM64 native mode on UT can start to make use of more modern CPUs.
  • UBports Continues Working On Unity 8, Developer ISO Coming
    While Canonical is no longer involved in Unity 8 development, the community-driven UBports team continues working on their "Unity 8" and "Ubuntu Touch" efforts with a hope to deliver a developer ISO soon. Sadly the Yunit project that also forked Unity 8's code-base doesn't seem to be active at least not regularly anymore, but the UBports team is working on delivering. In their latest Q&A session they share that Unity 8 on the desktop is coming together. One of the developers commented, "While it's both good and pretty, it's not 'pretty good'."
  • This Week In Mir (16th Feb, 2018)
  • Snapd 2.31 Better Supports Wayland Via Mir, Canonical Hires Another Mir Developer
    Besides Mir 0.30 being released this week, other Mir progress was also made by these Canonical developers working on forging Mir into a viable Wayland compositor. Gerry Boland of Canonical's Mir team has shared that Snapd 2.31 now supports any Snap implementing the Wayland interface. This allows for Mir to be shipped as a Snap and support Wayland clients using Canonical's app sandboxing approach alternative to Flatpaks.

Debian: The SysVinit Migration, Debian Debates, and package-hosting repository,

  • The SysVinit upstream project just migrated to git
    Surprising as it might sound, there are still computers using the traditional Sys V init system, and there probably will be until systemd start working on Hurd and FreeBSD. The upstream project still exist, though, and up until today, the upstream source was available from Savannah via subversion. I am happy to report that this just changed.
  • futures of distributions
    Seems Debian is talking about why they are unable to package whole categories of modern software, such as anything using npm. It's good they're having a conversation about that, and I want to give a broader perspective.
  • What is Debian all about, really? Or: friction, packaging complex applications
    This weekend, those interested in Debian development have been having a discussion on the debian-devel mailing list about "What can Debian do to provide complex applications to its users?". I'm commenting on that in my blog rather than the mailing list, since this got a bit too long to be usefully done in an email.
  • Updated my package-repository
    Yesterday I overhauled my Debian package-hosting repository, in response to user-complaints.

Games: Silver Case, Mercury Race, Ignorance is Strength, OpenRA and More

Future of Wine Staging

  • Future of Wine Staging
    Some of you may have already wondered why there were no Wine Staging releases lately and whether anything has changed. There are indeed some major changes, which we want to explain in this post. Before doing so, let us take a quick look at the history of this project. Wine Staging originated from Pipelight, a software to use Windows browser plugins in Linux/FreeBSD web browsers. In order to support Silverlight and its DRM system PlayReady, we had to create our own Wine version as the development code did not support storing Access Control Lists (ACLs) for files. It turned out that getting the support into the development version was quite difficult and Erich E. Hoover tried this since 2012. We figured out that there must be more patches that are considered as too experimental for the development branch and started with Wine Staging in 2014. While the project got larger and larger in roughly 120 releases, the maintenance effort also increased, especially since we follow the 2 week release cycle of the development branch.
  • Wine Staging is no longer putting out new releases
    There have been many people asking questions about the future of Wine Staging, turns out it's no longer going to have any new releases. I won't quote the entire post titled "Future of Wine Staging", but the gist of it is that they just don't have the spare time to put into it now. They have full time jobs, so naturally that doesn't leave much for something like this. I fully understand their situation and wish them all the best, I've seen so many people appreciate the work they did to bring so many different patches together for testing. The good news, is that there's already a fork available. On top of that, Wine developer Alexandre Julliard posted on the Wine mailing list about keeping it going in some form, so there might be light at the end of the tunnel.
  • Wine-Staging Will No Longer Be Putting Out New Releases
    Wine-Staging as many of you have known it for the past four years is unfortunately no more. We'll see if other reliable folks step up to maintain this experimental version of Wine but the original developers have sadly stepped away.