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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

Linux gaming rising: 7 big-name PC games that now call Linux home

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Linux
Gaming

Linux's gaming potential is about more than SteamOS and blockbuster ports. Earlier this year, GOG.com announced plans to bring a bevy of classic games to Ubuntu and Mint Linux this fall, with more than 100 games expected to be available at launch. Expect them to work just fine with SteamOS when the operating system finally launches sometime in 2015, too.

Speaking of Steam, it's not the big-name games but the indies that are driving Steam for Linux's true growth. After launching with a mere 60 native games just over a year ago, Steam for Linux now stands at more than 300 games strong—tremendous growth in a very short time. More and more games—like Europa Universalis IV, and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, and Dota 2, and Starbound—are starting to launch Linux versions alongside Windows counterparts.

It's still not quite the year of Linux on the desktop, but one thing's for certain: Linux's gaming prospects are looking brighter than ever before.

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Will Linux Ever Be Regarded as an Equal to Windows and Consoles at E3?

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Linux is slowly becoming a gaming alternative, but it's still a long way from consoles and Windows. How long will it take to see Linux represented at the E3 Expo in full effect, just like all the other platforms?

Making predictions is very hard, especially about the future. This simple statement from physicist Niels Bohr explains very well why it's difficult to anticipate what will happen in the world of technology. Some things evolve faster than we can predict and others seem to stagnate...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Superb Interstellar Marines Tactical FPS Arrives on Steam for Linux

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Gaming

nterstellar Marines, a tactical FPS developed and published by Zero Point Software, has just received Linux support with the latest patch.

Interstellar Marines is a very promising first-person shooter and its developers said that they took inspiration from Half-Life, System Shock 2, and Rainbow Six 3: Raven Shield. The game has been built mainly as a multiplayer experience, but a limited single-player is also available.

The latest update for the Interstellar Marines also brought support for the Linux platform and it looks like this title aims to be one of the best-looking on the open source platform...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Unreal Engine 4.2 Brings 500+ Updates

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Gaming

The latest major update to Epic Games' Unreal Engine 4 was released this week and the Linux support has taken another step forward.

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Valve Funds Glassy Mesa Development For Better Driver Performance

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Gaming

Valve has funded work by LunarG on a project codenamed "Glassy Mesa" to deliver potential performance improvements on the open-source Mesa graphics driver stack.

Glassy Mesa is an experimental project using LunarGLASS for plugging LLVM into Mesa for shader compilation and run-time improvements. LunarGLASS originated back in 2010 as using LLVM IR as the base intermediate representation for the shader and kernel compiler stack. LunarGLASS has performance potential via taking advantage of LLVM's many optimization passes.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software

Pithos 1.2

  • New Version of Linux Pandora Client ‘Pithos’ Released
    A new release of open-source Linux Pandora client Pithos is now available for download.
  • Pithos 1.2 Improves The Open-Source/Linux Pandora Desktop Experience
    Chances are if you've ever dealt with Pandora music streaming from the Linux desktop you've encountered Pithos as the main open-source solution that works out quite well. Released today was Pithos 1.2 and it ships with numerous enhancements for this GPLv3-licensed Pandora desktop client. Pithos 1.2 adds a number of new keyboard shortcuts for the main window, initial support for translations, an explicit content filter option, reduced CPU usage with Ubuntu's default theme, redesigned dialogs and other UI elements, and more.