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Gaming

Top 8 Games For 'Non-Gamers' in Linux

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Gaming

techdrivein.com: I am not a serious gamer at all. If you want to see me totally disoriented, play an FPS game in front of me. But then there are always these silly games for people like me. Here is a quick list of my favorite time wasters or puzzle games or whatever you call it.

Quake2 engine day ;)

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Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: Believe it or not Quake2 is alive and kicking... and its engine is featuring some of the very best open-source games!

5 More Linux Games

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Gaming
  • 5 More Linux Games You Probably Haven’t Played
  • The Chzo Mythos For GNU/Linux Released

Thousands Play Starcraft 2 on Linux

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Gaming

jeffhoogland.blogspot: I play Starcraft 2 on Linux and apparently I'm not the only one.

Some puzzle games

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Gaming
  • Some puzzle games
  • Lots of Gaming Lushness

10 Websites for Puzzles, Brain Teasers and Riddles

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Web
Gaming

makeuseof.com: Riddle me this, riddle me that… So goes the popular line from one of superhero fiction’s most popular villains. And we are hooked as The Riddler plots Batman’s downfall with a riddle. That’s the hook that a good riddle delivers.

Quake LIVE Pro and Premium packages

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Gaming

itwire.com: Playing Quake, an all action First Person Shooter, inside your browser window was completely mythical five years ago. But the free game phenomenon now has some pay-to-play options for those wanting more from their browser based bangs.

Fifteen Puzzle: Overhauled

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Gaming

liveblue.wordpress: I remember, a long time ago, Tomaz (tumaix || tcanabrava) showing me what KDE was all about, explaining all the philosophy behind it and why it was there for. “I like this puzzle thing.” He’d let go a frustrated sigh.

Makers of Machinarium Having Pirate Amnesty Sale

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Gaming

maximumpc.com: The makers of the point-and-click adventure game Machinarium came to a realization recently. Their DRM-free game was being pirated by about 90% of players. Such is life for a game that doesn't bother users with serials or authentication.

The Amnesia Game Gets Ready For A Linux Release

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Gaming

phoronix.com: For those trying to find a new Linux game that offers good graphics while not being a first person shooter with little to no plot -- as is the case for a majority of the commercial and open-source games available for Linux -- the Amnesia: The Dark Descent game is expected to be released next month.

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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more