Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Ioquake3 Is Finally Moving To Its New OpenGL Renderer By Default

    The ioquake3 open-source game engine project that's built around the Quake III: Arena code-base is finally moving to its new renderer by default and abandoning the original 17-year-old renderer.

    Beginning next month they will be defaulting new ioquake3 installs to using their "OpenGL 2" renderer and in November will disable the original renderer for all ioquake3 installations.

  • Agricola spinoff and Patchwork pass Greenlight, heading to Linux

    Two more digital incarnations of designer Uwe Rosenberg's hit 2-player board games are coming to Linux on Steam, as they've both now passed their Greenlight campaigns!

    Yes, they are mobile ports, just as Le Havre: The Inland Port is, but that doesn't mean they're of poor quality. In fact, it's just the opposite. I've played all three on Android (and the Le Havre spinoff additionally on Linux), and they're all fantastic and well-polished implementations. DIGIDICED is a team of only 4 developers, but they're really doing a great job with the licenses. They've even shown evidence of acting on user feedback with Le Havre, so I feel confident in recommending them to my fellow Linux gamers.

  • Wargame: European Escalation works once again for Nvidia users, two years after breaking

    It seems Wargame: European Escalation was broken for nearly two years (see this forum post) for Nvidia GPU users on Linux.

  • Curvatron, a simple yet interesting evolution of the old game 'Snake', we have free keys for you

    Curvatron has recently been released on Linux and the developer sent in a bunch of keys for you lucky people. The game itself is inspired by the old game 'Snake' that was on rather old Nokia mobile phones.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • We Happy Few to release on Linux after the full release, not during Early Access

    I spoke to the developer of We Happy Few on twitter to get an update on the Linux version, it seems it has been pushed back.

  • Booting the Final GameCube Game

    Every single GameCube game can at least boot in Dolphin 5.0. Except one. Star Wars: The Clone Wars and its complex way of using the PowerPC Memory Management Unit rendered it unplayable in Dolphin up to this day. But finally as of Dolphin 5.0-540, this challenge has come and gone: Dolphin can finally boot every single GameCube game in the official library.

  • Our Fourth Podcast with Cheese, Porter on DOTT Remastered

    A couple of weeks ago I had the chance to get some time with Cheese (based in Australia), who worked on the recent port of Day of the Tentactle Remastered by Double Fine. We actually ended talking for a very long time (Cheese is very talkative, but that’s great because most of what he talks about is really interesting and insightful) so his podcast is just a short, edited version of the bits we found the most relevant to share with you.

    Since Day of the Tentacle Remastered was the first port of Cheese (while he was already involved in Linux game development for a long time), it was a great opportunity to learn more about how you should approach porting and games packaging for Linux. He had already provided some great amount of details in his blog post, and I wanted to go a little further with this podcast on some particular points.

  • Rocket League Beta Impressions

    Rocket League is the sequel to Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars (AKA SARP Battle-Cars) for the PlayStation 3. Seeing as the first game wasn’t a very good success, Psyonix, the developer and publisher behind both games, looked to address some of the issues that were presented, while still maintaining much of the core of Battle-Cars: you’re in control of a remote-controlled car in a soccer/football field, and the goal is simple: knock a ball into the goal, while preventing the opposing team from doing the same thing. It’s basically soccer (or, what most countries would call football) with RC cars. These cars can be customized to your liking, whether you like a monster truck with flaming red flames or a limousine with simple design and elegance. Much of the DLC actually has additional fancy-looking cars from which you can purchase (I’m probably going to wait until there’s a Game of the Year edition, as none of the DLC actually expands the gameplay itself). Your car has a boost gauge that will fill up as you collect orange patches on the ground and drain as you use it. These boosts give the game a little bit more complexity as cars can rush to their side to prevent a goal, add a little more knockout force when hitting the ball, or lifting yourself up into the air for an air hit. Or, if you’re like me, if your car goes fast enough you can run other cars over, forcing them to respawn to a random location. In addition, the cars can do frontflips, backflips, and sideflips to ensure a more accurate shot. Now Rocket League is currently among the top ten highest-player-count games on Steam. I’m honestly not much into the game myself but I certainly understand why it’s so popular. In fact, it’s considered to be an eSport, with tournaments every weekend.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Rocket League for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Rocket League Officially Released for SteamOS and Linux with a 25% Off Promotion

    On September 8, 2016, game studio Psyonix was proud to announce the availability of a Beta version of the popular Rocket League game for SteamOS/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems.

    Rocket League is a futuristic, physics-based sports/action game that lets players play European football while driving booster-rigged vehicles. It is the successor of the popular and classic Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars game released in 2008 only for Sony's PlayStation 3 gaming console, also developed and published by the Psyonix game studio.

    The game officially hit the Microsoft Windows and PlayStation 4 platforms in July 2015, and a few months later, in February 2016, it arrived for Microsoft's Xbox One gaming console as well. Due to popular demand, Rocket League is now also officially available for the Linux and Apple's Mac OS X operating systems, but only in a Beta form at the moment of writing this article.

  • Rocket League Finally Released For Linux
  • Rocket League released for SteamOS, it's in beta

    Rocket League is now officially available for SteamOS, due to the time of the release I will be unable to give any actual impressions as I am likely asleep while this gets published.

    I will be able to get impressions up rather early tomorrow morning (UTC time), as it will be my first priority. It will likely be the main game on our Friday livestream too.

    It's been a bit of a wild ride, but it's here ‒ finally.

  • Mesa & AMDGPU-PRO Appear To Run Fine With Rocket League On Linux

    With many Linux gamers having looked forward to the Linux release of Rocket League, I tested out the Linux port of the game when using Mesa RadeonSI Gallium3D as well as the AMDGPU-PRO blob.

    Considering Rocket League on Linux lists system requirements even lower than the Windows specifications and do mention AMD, I was expecting the process to go well. Additionally, Rocket League is powered by Unreal Engine 3 -- yes, UE3, not UE4. Considering that, it went well.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Rocket League Launches on Linux This Week

    Oh boy, have you been patiently waiting for it — and now it’s finally coming. Yes, Rocket League for Linux will launch in beta on September 8. Developer’s Psyonix say they will only support SteamOS “officially”, though the game should be able to run on any modern Linux distro that Steam does, including Ubuntu.

  • Rocket League coming to OS X and Linux this week

    Rocket League, the race car-football (soccer) game fusion, will receive a new update on Thursday, September 8th. One of the biggest components of the update is the included OS X and SteamOS (including Linux distributions) support. The update also comes with a new Rumble mode, updates to classic Rocket Trails, and other changes.

  • Unigine-Powered Sci-Fi MMORPG Turn

    Earlier this year we heard of a science fiction MMORPG game making use of Unigine 2 after switching from Unreal Engine 4.

SteamOS 2.91 Beta Updates Linux Kernel to Improve ath10k Wireless Support

Filed under
Development
Gaming

Valve released a new Beta version of the next stable branch of its SteamOS gaming distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux, SteamOS 2.91, which was pushed to the brewmaster_beta channel on August 31, 2016.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more