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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • JS package catalog npm frees its team software for open source devs

    npm Inc, the company behind the Node.js package manager and command-line utility known by the same three letters, on Wednesday plans to make its developer collaboration tool known as Orgs free for open source projects.

    Those using npm to manage private packages still have to pay. "This lets us decouple the paid features from the team management features," said npm cofounder Isaac Schlueter in a phone interview with The Register.

    Orgs, or Organizations, depending upon where one looks on the inconsistent npm website, costs $7 per month per user. There's also a sensible requirement for at least two users. Otherwise it's not much of an organization.

  • A new (slow) open source JPEG algorithm makes images 35% smaller and looks better than older compression systems

    Guetzli is Google's new free/open JPEG compression algorithm, which produces images that are more than a third smaller in terms of byte-size, and the resulting images are consistently rated as more attractive than traditionally compressed JPEGs. It's something of a web holy grail: much smaller, better-looking files without having to convince people to install a plugin or browser makers to support a new file-format.

  • Open source: The new normal in enterprise software

    Open source software — that is, software that gives users permission to modify, copy and distribute its source code and is either freely distributed or licensed — used to be viewed as the red-headed stepchild of enterprise software.

    "It took time for enterprise to come on board," said Rafael Laguna, CEO of Open-Xchange, a German open-source company specializing in open-source email software. "If you go back 10 years, [proprietary software from] Microsoft, IBM dominated the architecture of enterprise software, but that is changing."

  • Blender Making Progress On Its Realtime PBR Engine

    F
    Eevee is the codename for the Blender project to implement a realtime engine with physically-based rendering (PBR) within Blender 2.8.

    This realtime, PBR-based engine is aiming to deliver high-end graphics with a responsive realtime view-port. The developers working on "Eevee" have made progress with lighting, materials, and other features.

  • Chef automation survey: what shape is the continuous enterprise?
  • Cloud Foundry connects open-source standards for quicker code development

    Tech businesses are discovering a powerful truth: building custom code is no fun. It takes time, it’s a distraction from working on core products and it’s likely someone out there already did it better. The real solution is for a company to integrate mature and tested products into their own systems, but that can be a job in itself.

    Open-source software, built around specific abstract standards, can help simplify the work involved. Cloud Foundry is an organization dedicated to creating and maintaining an open-source abstraction platform to speed up software development.

  • IBM's cloud dreams soar on the wings of AI, open source
  • IBM launches cloud-based blockchain service for Linux Hyperledger Fabric

    IBM also announced availability of blockchain governance tools and new open-source developer tools aimed at shortening the time it takes to build with Hyperledger Fabric.

  • 10 Vendors Jumping on the Kubernetes Bandwagon
  • From supply chain to equity, seven real-world uses of the blockchain today

    A blockchain is a digital ledger that is available for all parties to see, providing transparency across the chain – and businesses in financial trading, insurance, and supply chain management are all taking notice.

  • Mozilla has proposed 'Obsidian', a low-level GPU API for the web

    So it looks like after Vulkan for desktop and mobile, the web may be getting a low-level API for interactions with the GPU. They are calling it Obsidian right now (temporary name) and they state it's not a specification just yet, as they are looking to gather feedback.

Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS
  • 33C3 - Event Report

    I recently had the opportunity to attend the 33rd Chaos Communication Congress (33C3). The event, as its name suggests, was chaotic. Let me give you two hints: twelve thousand (12000) participants, plus twenty-four (24) hours unrestricted access to the venue.

  • LibrePlanet free software conference returns to MIT this weekend, March 25-26

    LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. LibrePlanet 2017 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels.

    In accordance with the theme "The Roots of Freedom," the conference's sessions will examine the roots of the free software movement, including the Four Freedoms, the GNU General Public License and copyleft, and the community's focus on security and privacy protections. Other sessions will explore new ideas and current work that has arisen from those roots, reaching in to activism, the arts, business, and education.

    Keynote speakers include Kade Crockford, Director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, special consultant to the Electronic Frontier Foundation and author Cory Doctorow, Changeset Consulting founder Sumana Harihareswara, and Free Software Foundation founder and president Richard Stallman.

  • ZTE’s Approach to Digital Transformation with Software-Defined Networking

    The dawn of new services such as 5G, IoT, AR/VR, e-commerce, connected cars,and more, is driving us to digitalization -- a massive transition that also requires the network to change.

  • Easier Persistent Memory Programming with Extensions to libstdc++ and libc++

    Persistent memory, unlike volatile memory, retains its contents even if the server has a power failure. However, as Tomasz Kapela, Software Engineer at Intel, points out during his LinuxCon Europe 2016 talk, persistent memory is hard to achieve. Since persistent memory programming is non-trivial, they have been focused on making it easier for the end user and for applications to use persistent memory correctly.

  • Persistent Memory Extensions to libstdc++/libc++ by Tomasz Kapela, Intel

Chromium and Chrome

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chromium Rolls Out Enhanced GTK3 Theme Support

    Chromium is sporting greater GTK3 support in its latest daily development snapshots. Developers have begun building the browser with proper GTK3 theme integration enabled by default. I know: hardly ground breaking, but as Chromium (and its more popular sibling, Google Chrome) are widely used by Ubuntu users, it’s a change worth a note.

  • Chrome 58 Beta: IndexedDB 2.0, an improvement to iframe navigation, and immersive full screen for PWAs

    The IndexedDB 2.0 standard is now fully supported in Chrome, making it simpler to work with large data sets in the browser. IDB 2.0 features new schema management, bulk action methods, and more standardized handling of failures.

  • Chrome 58 Beta Supports IndexedDB 2.0, New Developer Features

    Google developers are busy today not only with the Android O Developer Preview but the Chrome team has delivered the first public beta for the upcoming Chrome 58.0.

    The Chrome 58 beta adds full support for IndexedDB 2.0, improvements to iframe navigation by adding a new sandbox keyword to control iframe top navigation behavior, immersive full-screen support for Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), and various other developer changes.

Kodi 17.1 “Krypton” is Released

Filed under
Movies
OSS
  • Kodi v17.1 “Krypton”

    This is the bugfix release for v17.1 “Krypton” which contains our continuous effort to further improve the v17 release. Our team tried to tackle as much of the reported problems as possible with the limited resources we have. We do want to note that since we are just a small team some of the reported bugs might not get fixed due to lack of developers or time. As such we would certainly welcome any developer who has the ability to help us out to try and fix the bugs he or she encounters and submit it to our code base for review. We sure would like to thank every one involved with either development, testing or simply helping out others with answering their questions.

  • Kodi 17 "Krypton" Gets First Point Release, Estuary and Estouchy Skins Improved

    Kodi's Martijn Kaijser announced today the general and immediate availability for download of the first point release to the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and multi-platform media center.

    Kodi 17.1 is here about three weeks after the release of the major Kodi 17 "Krypton" series, and it only addresses some of the issues that users reported since then. The most important change is an update to both the Estuary and Estouchy skins, to which some of the users still need to adjust. However, this maintenance update also improves various other components of the popular media center (see below for details).

Two open source secure email services

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OSS

As much we all complain about email, for most of us, email is still our primary conduit for online communication. That said, numerous hacks and revelations about government surveillance have made it clear that email is also one of the most vulnerable of those conduits.

What you send via email is your business and yours alone. Besides you and the recipient, no one else should be reading that message. Not hackers, not government agencies, and definitely not nosy siblings or friends.

Read more

Linux on Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server
OSS
  • DevOps still very much a work in progress, survey suggests

    That's the key takeaway from a recent survey of 2,045 IT managers and professionals, released by Quali, an IT automation solutions provider. While most people in enterprises would say at this point that they have DevOps underway in some shape or form, achieving agility is another story.

  • IBM chases Google, Microsoft with Kubernetes in the cloud

    It's only a matter of time before every major cloud vendor offers a version of Kubernetes as a service. Now it’s IBM’s turn.

  • In The Virtualization Space, Containers Are Making A Move

    Wow has it been a whirlwind over the last ten years in the virtualization space. Where once Xen and then KVM sat on the pedestal, the baton has been passed to the projects revolved around containers. Names like Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos are most often mentioned. As is generally the case in the FLOSS arena, evolution is a constant. Therefore, if one is in the DevOps arena, it is time to familiarize yourself with containers if you have not already done so.

  • The DOE and NSA Construct Doomsday Scenario for American HPC

    One last point. The Chinese economy continues to expand faster than that of the US, and, depending on who you talk to, will reach the size of the US sometime between 2018 and 2028. Such an economy would be expected to field an HPC capability on par with that of the US. Furthermore, China and the US should both be able to maintain an indigenous and self-sustaining HPC capability for their own use, and it’s unreasonable to think either could prevent the other from doing so. In such a world, the US may no longer enjoy technological supremacy, but it can surely have the wherewithal to control its own future in HPC.

  • [Older] Getting Down To Bare Metal On The Cloud

    When you think of the public cloud, the tendency is to focus on the big ones, like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud Platform. They’re massive, dominating the public cloud skyline with huge datacenters filled with thousands of highly virtualized servers, not to mention virtualized storage and networking. Capacity is divvied up among corporate customers that are increasingly looking to run and store their workloads on someone else’s infrastructure, hardware that they don’t have to set up, deploy, manage or maintain themselves.

  • Avoid complex infrastructure when building simple things

    For local development, go crazy. For real production use.. I think you should avoid this until you’re the size of business that someone else will do this for you. If this seems controversial do the math: include backing it up, patching it, keeping it highly available, the time spent not working on your differentiating features etc. There are plenty of datastore services available that will do all this for you and let you focus your limited time on your app, and they’re really very cheap when you consider the actual cost of running a production database. Write your app so that the cost of moving to your own database later if you need to is unlikely to be high. Managing a simple web app instead of managing a web app, a production database, a message queue etc is a big win.

  • DebConf17 welcomes its first eighteen sponsors!

    DebConf17 will take place in Montreal, Canada in August 2017. We are working hard to provide fuel for hearts and minds, to make this conference once again a fertile soil for the Debian Project flourishing. Please join us and support this landmark in the Free Software calendar.

  • [OT] Smartphone App: Retro Recorder and Call Recorder for your Tizen mobile

FOSS Events

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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • 9 Open Source Tools For Network Monitoring and Management

    Managing the network could be a headache, especially when you don’t have the right tool. There are plenty of network monitoring tools available which lets you identify loopholes and bugs. Many of them are paid and several open source network management tools are also available.

    Instead of spending a fortune, it’s a viable choice to look for (free) open source tools, as might possible what you are looking for isn’t available with premium one. I have identified 12 best network monitoring and management software to ease IT admins jobs.

  • 19 years ago

    19 years ago on this day I released the first ever version of a software project I decided to name curl. Just a little hobby you know. Nothing fancy.

    19 years ago that was a few hundred lines of code. Today we’re at around 150.000 lines.

  • Open source LittleRP2 DLP 3D printer offers new vat, height, projector options

    The LittleRP 3D printer, an "affordable, open 3D resin printer" released in 2014, has received a full upgrade. The LittleRP2 introduces a configurable vat, an extended height option, additional controller shield options, added projector compatibility, and more new features and refinements.

  • iCub the Open Source Robot

    Apparently, the iCub open-source robot can be taught anything a 4-year-old can learn. I wonder if it can be taught to whine annoyingly, be unkind to its little sister, refuse to go to bed at night, wake up its parents too early in the morning, etc.

Openwashing

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OSS

Malaysian IT decision-makers turn to open source to maximise IT capabilities

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

RED Hat, Inc, a provider of open source solutions, announces the results of a commissioned study by Forrester Consulting, on behalf of Red Hat, about the use of open source in digital innovation initiatives in the Asia Pacific region.

The results, highlighted in the study Open Source Drives Digital Innovation revealed that majority of IT decision-makers in Malaysia are turning to open source in order to maximise their IT capabilities.

The research surveyed 455 CIOs and senior IT decision-makers from nine countries in Asia Pacific. The insights gathered reflect that 76% of respondents in Malaysia regard open source as a cost-saving option whereas 24% consider it to be a strategic investment for their organisations.

“Many anticipate that the pace of digital disruption will only pick up, causing wider and deeper impact on businesses, and every industry may soon find a digital competitor.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE/Qt

  • Device Tailored Compositors with Qt Wayland at CLAAS E-Systems
    Have you heard about software in cars that run on embedded devices? Do you think that creating such software might be challenging? Well, welcome to a complete new world of complexity, welcome to the world of agriculture machines! For many years, automatic steering (on fields), terminals to control the complex mechanical operations of a self-driving 16 ton combine harvester on a soft ground, and self-optimization systems to optimize any tiny bit of your harvester, are key demands from customers. I, myself, am working at CLAAS E-Systems, the electronics and software department within the CLAAS group. Our group is well known for being among the leading manufacturers for combine harvesters, tractors and forage harvesters.
  • Qt Wayland Is Next Appearing On Tractors & Farm Equipment
    With Qt 5.8's Qt Wayland Compositor Framework taking shape, more developers are beginning to tailor a Qt Wayland compositor to their use-cases. One of those is a company specializing in farm equipment like combine harvesters, tractors, and harvesters. As a guest post on the official Qt blog, developer Andreas Cord-Landwehr of CLAAS E-Systems talked up Qt Wayland for their purposes in the highly-regulated agriculture industry.
  • KDevelop 5.1 Open-Source IDE Launches with LLDB and OpenCL Support, Many Changes
    The development team behind the popular, open-source, cross-platform, free and powerful KDevelop IDE (Integrated Development Environment) were proud to announce the official release and general availability of KDevelop 5.1. KDevelop 5.1 is now the most advanced stable version of the application, which is written entirely in Qt and designed to be used on various GNU/Linux distributions that usually ship with the KDE Plasma desktop environment, but also on the latest releases of the Microsoft Windows operating system.

Leftovers: Gaming

GNOME News: GNOME 3.24 Everywhere

  • GNOME 3.24 released
    The GNOME Project is proud to announce the release of GNOME 3.24, "Portland".
  • GNOME 3.24 Released, This Is What’s New
    Hurrah! GNOME 3.24 is now available to download. The latest stable release of the open-source GNOME desktop, GNOME 3.24 brings a number of new features and improvements to the proverbial table, including one that might even help you sleep better!
  • GNOME 3.24 Linux desktop environment is here
    My absolute favorite desktop environment for Linux is GNOME. Quite frankly, if the DE went away tomorrow, I might have to rethink my use of Linux entirely. Yeah, I am that passionate about it. Environment aside, the GNOME experience also includes a collection of applications, creating a coherent user experience.
  • GNOME 3.24 Released
    GNOME 3.24, the latest version of GNOME 3, is now available. Introducing an updated platform and applications, the release includes a number of major new features and enhancements, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. 3.24 represents another step forward for GNOME, and has much to offer both users and developers.