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OSS

The Private Internet Access Android app is being open sourced

Filed under
Android
OSS
Security

Private Internet Access (PIA) is open sourcing its Android VPN app and dependencies code to the public as part of its commitment to open sourcing all clients in the name of transparency and privacy. The Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) community is a cornerstone of everything we enjoy on the internet.

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Browsers and Privacy

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Browsers, web sites, and user tracking

    Browser tracking across different sites is certainly a major privacy concern and one that is more acute when the boundaries between sites and browsers blur—or disappear altogether. That seems to be the underlying tension in a "discussion" of an only tangentially related proposal being made by Google to the W3C Technical Architecture Group (TAG). The proposal would change the handling of the User-Agent headers sent by browsers, but the discussion turned to the unrelated X-Client-Data header that Chrome sends to Google-owned sites. The connection is that in both cases some feel that the web-search giant is misusing its position to the detriment of its users and its competitors in the web ecosystem.

  • Data detox: Four things you can do today to protect your computer

    From the abacus to the iPad, computers have been a part of the human experience for longer than we think. So much so that we forget the vast amounts of personal data we share with our devices on a daily basis. On any given day we could be tackling sensitive work emails, planning our next vacation, or just booking some good ole doctor’s appointments. No big deal right? Well, in the wrong hands it can become a huge deal.

    Thankfully, it’s pretty easy to tighten your device security. Read on for four easy things you can do today to protect your personal info along with your devices.

What Every Open Source Software User Needs to Know About Open Source Licenses

Filed under
OSS

Not all free and open source (OS) software licenses have been created to achieve the same goals, and failure to understand the differences can have dire consequences. Some OS licenses are business-friendly in that they allow the code to be combined with downstream proprietary applications without imposing open source licensing requirements on those downstream applications. Others do not allow such combinations in any circumstances (at least if the developer wishes the products to remain proprietary), and some licenses fall somewhere in between these two extremes. Here is the minimum knowledge your company and development team should have regarding OS license types before incorporating OS code into software you develop.

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"I Love Free Software Day": Swipe (copy)left on dating apps

Filed under
GNU
OSS

Every year, Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) encourages supporters to celebrate Valentine’s Day as “I Love Free Software Day,” a day for supporters to show their gratitude to the people who enable them to enjoy software freedom, including maintainers, contributors, and other activists. It seems appropriate on this holiday to once again address how seeking love on the Internet is, unfortunately, laden with landmines for your freedom and privacy. But today, I’m also going to make the argument that our community should think seriously about developing a freedom-respecting alternative.

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Servers and CMS Leftovers (HPCC, Weblate and AgoraCart)

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web
  • Stanford Student Program Gives Supercomputers a Second Life

    Despite their incredible capabilities, today’s supercomputers typically only have three years of operating life before they need an upgrade. With the march of Moore’s Law, faster, more efficient systems are always waiting to replace them.
    A novel program at Stanford is finding a second life for used HPC clusters, providing much-needed computational resources for research while giving undergraduate students a chance to learn valuable career skills. To learn more, we caught up with Dellarontay Readus from the Stanford High Performance Computing Center (HPCC).

  • 30 projects migrated their translation to Weblate, what about yours?

    The localization community gave it’s approval: Weblate fits our expectations. Many projects have already migrated. It’s time for yours to migrate, because the next Fedora release will mark the end of the old translation platform.

  • AgoraCart "Route 66" Version Released

    I have avoided any spotlight in the Perl community after negative experiences early on but at the urging of Gabor Szabo over at PerlMaven.com, I realized that I should not care if I am not the normal Perl community member/developer. As a result, announcements on Perl type groups was skipped until now. So here's to new beginnings.

    I love the flexibility of Perl and hated the feeling that I was giving up on it as other languages rose in popularity and Perl seemed to surrender from the web on its own accord. I restarted development of the new version of AgoraCart during my masters degree coursework, and kept grinding on the development and testing for another 2+ years. This release marks a huge milestone, for AgoraCart and for me personally. I basically gave up on AgoraCart for a few years (motivation to work on it came and went like the changes in the wind after a family tragedy).

Open Source and Free Software (FSF)

Filed under
GNU
OSS
  • My whole career is built on FOSS

    My whole career is built on FOSS.

    My x86(-64) desktop runs GNU/Linux since day one (September 2000) as main system. There was OpenDOS as second during studies due to some stuff.

    I had MS Windows XP as second system on one of laptops. But that’s due to some Arm hardware bringup tool being available only for this OS (later also for Linux). My family and friends learnt that I am unable to help them with MS Windows issues as I do not know that OS.

  • Five Open-Source Projects AI Enthusiasts Might Want to Know About

    Linux is arguably software developers’ favorite OS. Over 14,000 contributors have invested countless hours in developing the Linux Kernel. With Linux becoming increasingly popular due to its security and flexibility, developers who are interested in artificial intelligence (AI) may want to explore the possibilities within the Linux environment.

    [...]
    AI is all the rage in different industries, and rightly so. AI-powered tools and systems have the potential to change processes for the better—healthcare becomes more factual than intuitive, increases in revenue can be seen more clearly in marketing efforts, and food security becomes a reality rather than a dream.

    However, we should not discount the fact that AI can also be weaponized, empowering the wrong people. Cybersecurity systems must also be upgraded to counter AI-powered cyberattacks. And when developing AI-powered machines, it is critical to ensure that they are not vulnerable to attacks.

  • New Faces added in 2019

    I’m pleased to report that we added 18 new Faces to the project in 2019!

  • Thank you for supporting the FSF

    On January 17th, we closed the Free Software Foundation (FSF)'s end of the year fundraiser and associate membership drive, bringing 368 new associate members to the FSF community.

    This year's fundraiser began with a series of shareable images aiming to bring user freedom issues to the kitchen table, helping to start conversations about the impact that proprietary software has on the autonomy and privacy of our everyday lives. Your enthusiasm in sharing these has been inspiring. We also debuted the ShoeTool video, an animated short presenting a day in the life of an unfortunate elf who is duped into forking over his liberty for the sake of convenience. And we also sent out our biannual issue of the Free Software Bulletin, which had FSF staff writing on topics as diverse as ethical software licensing and online dating.

OpenShot 2.5 Open-Source Video Editor Adds Hardware Acceleration

Filed under
OSS

OpenShot 2.5 is here two and a half years after the OpenShot 2.4 release, and almost a year after the OpenShot 2.4.4 point release. It’s a major update that introduces experimental hardware acceleration (encoding and decoding) support, which should greatly improve the performance of the video editor.

If you’re installing OpenShot 2.5 on a powerful computer with a capable graphics card, you should notice up to 40% performance increase. However, please keep in mind that hardware encoding and decoding is still under development, so it may not work as expected all the time.

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Outreachy: Anisa Kuci at FOSDEM 2020 & Outreachy Summer 2020 Openings

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • FOSDEM 2020

    As many other people, this year I attended FOSDEM.

    For the ones that might not be familiar with the name, FOSDEM is the biggest free software developers gathering in Europe, happening every year in Brussels, Belgium.

    This year I decided to attend again as it is an event I have really enjoyed the last two times I have attended during the past years. As I am currently doing my Outreachy internship I found FOSDEM a very good opportunity to receive some more inspiration. My goal was to come back from this event with some ideas or motivation that would help during the last phases of my internship, as I need to work on documentation and best practices on fundraising. I also wanted to meet in person the people that I have worked with so far regarding Outreachy and discuss with them in person about organizational topics and even ask for advice.

    [...]

    My Outreachy internship finishes soon and this is also one of the reasons why my mentor supported attending FOSDEM using the Outreachy stipend. FOSDEM is huge, and you meet hundreds of people within two days, so it is a good opportunity to look for a future job. There is also a job fair booth where companies post job offers. I surely passed by and got myself some offers that I thought would be suitable for me.

    And the cherry on top of the cake during FOSDEM, are all the booths distributed in different buildings. I did not only meet friends from different communities, but also got to know so many new projects that I had not heard of before. And of course, got some very nice swag. Stickers and other goodies are never too much!

  • Two Weeks Are Left To Apply For An Outreachy Summer 2020 Open-Source Internship

    Accepted Outreachy interns are awarded with a $5,500 USD stipend (and $500 travel stipend) for contributing from May to August. For this round, there are six HTML/CSS projects, five JavaScript projects, four Python projects, four Git projects, and other skill-sets. This summer 2020 round includes working on Creative Commons, improving internationalization for the Guix data service, better desktop environment integration for Guix, improving Sound Open Firmware debugging, and creating a command-line runner for Wikimedia's MediaWiki maintenance tasks, among others.

Open Hardware/Boot: Coreboot, Oreboot, Bootlin

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • The Current State of AMD Zen Coreboot Support: Basically Limited To Chromebooks

    Firmware developer Michał Żygowski of embedded consulting firm 3mdeb has provided a convenient overview over the current state of AMD Coreboot support for booting with this open-source alternative to conventional proprietary BIOS.

  • Oreboot Continues Advancing For Open-Source, Rust-Based Booting On RISC-V

    Oreboot is the effort that has been taking shape over the past year as an open-source focused, Rustlang-based downstream of Coreboot. Oreboot continues advancing in its own right concurrent to the wonderful Coreboot advancements.

    Oreboot continues to pride itself on being as open-source as possible though acknowledging at least for now on x86 CPUs they need the likes of ME/FSP firmware. Oreboot is also still focused on using Rust code rather than C code in the name of better security and reliability.

  • Bootlin at Embedded World 2020

    Bootlin will be preent at Embedded World 2020, in Nuremberg on February 25-27. We will be present on STMicroelectronics booth in hall 4A, stand 138. We will have two demos of the STM32MP1 platform running Linux, and of course details about Bootlin services around embedded Linux and Linux kernel development and training.

    Three people from Bootlin will be present: Michael Opdenacker (CEO), Thomas Petazzoni (CTO) and Alexandre Belloni (embedded Linux engineer and trainer).

Dino is a Modern Looking Open Source XMPP Client

Filed under
OSS

XMPP (Extensible Messaging Presence Protocol) is a decentralized model of network to facilitate instant messaging and collaboration. Decentralize means there is no central server that has access to your data. The communication is directly between the end-points.

Some of us might call it an “old school” tech probably because the XMPP clients usually have a very bad user experience or simply just because it takes time to get used to (or set it up).

That’s when Dino comes to the rescue as a modern XMPP client to provide a clean and snappy user experience without compromising your privacy.

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