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Linux and FOSS Events: DebConf17, OpenStack Summit, LPC, and Fedora

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OSS
  • Bursary applications for DebConf17 are closing in 48 hours!

    This is a final reminder: if you intend to apply for a DebConf17 bursary and have not yet done so, please proceed as soon as possible.

    Bursary applications for DebConf17 will be accepted until May 10th at 23:59 UTC. Applications submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

  • OpenStack Summit Emphasizes Emerging Deployment Models

    The OpenStack Summit kicked off here today with multiple announcements and an emphasis on the evolution of the cloud deployment model.

    Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation, said during his keynote that there has been a 44 percent year-over-year increase in the volume of OpenStack deployments, with OpenStack now running on more than 5 million compute cores around the world.

  • OpenStack Foundation slams claims open source cloud platform's days are numbered

    The OpenStack Foundation is on a mission to clear up a number of misconceptions about the open source cloud platform, particularly those pertaining to its often predicted demise.

  • OpenStack Summit: All the biggest news from Red Hat to Rackspace & Dell EMC
  • Submission deadline for LPC refereed track proposals extended

    The deadline for submitting refereed track proposals for the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) has been extended until May 13. "The refereed track will have 50-minute presentations on a specific aspect of Linux "plumbing" (e.g. core libraries, media creation/playback, display managers, init systems, kernel APIs/ABIs, etc.) that are chosen by the LPC committee to be given during all three days of the conference." LPC will be held September 13-15 in Los Angeles, CA.

  • Conference travel for speakers

    In Free and Open Source Software culture, conferences became an important part of the community. Most of the projects or communities do the work over this beautiful thing known as the Internet, people are taking part from the warmth of their home. Conferences are the only time when we all get a chance to meet, discuss new ideas, share the knowledge among ourselves. Conference speakers are generally the volunteers who agree to spend a lot of time to prepare and then give the talk, do the QA session. This also involves a lot of travel, for any mid-sized to a big conference, you will always find at least couple of speakers traveling half of the world to give those talks.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • MapD's GPU-powered database is now open source

    As announced in a press release and blog post, the core database and its "associated visualization libraries" are available under the Apache 2.0 license. But enterprise-level features like the high availability, LDAP, ODBC, and horizontal scaling functionality—many of which debuted in the 3.0 version released earlier this month—will be kept close to the chest.

  • Sprint, Intel Join Forces on C3PO 5G User Plane Open Source Project

    SAN JOSE, California —Although it’s not May 4, the annual day of celebration to honor the iconic “Star Wars” movie, it still seems fitting to talk about Sprint’s new open source project, called C3PO. Last week at the 2017 NFV World Congress, Sprint revealed it’s working with Intel on the open source project the companies believe will result in a more flexible and scalable 5G control plane. C3PO stands for CUPS [control and user plane separation] for packet optimization.

  • Dell EMC's newest switches will come with its open network OS

    Dell's drive into open networking accelerated on Monday with the announcement of the first switches to ship with OS10, the company's network operating system that's based on open source.

    At Dell EMC World in Las Vegas, the company introduced two data-center switches running OS10 Enterprise Edition, an enhanced version of the open-source OS that Dell announced early last year.

    The software is based on technologies from the Linux Foundation and the Open Compute Project and is already available through an extended beta to customers who already have hardware. The Enterprise Edition is a complete software platform, including Dell's networking stack, but its open-source foundation means it can be extended with third-party software, said Jeff Baher, Dell EMC's executive director, networking.

  • Verizon unlocks the power of open source and virtualization with the addition of new whitebox options to its universal CPE offer
  • Dell EMC must adapt or die in open-source and cloud-dominated world, say analysts
  • 8 ways to get started with open source hardware

    Alan Kay, famed computer scientist, once said, "People who are really serious about software should make their own hardware." I'd argue that's as true today as it was in 1982 when he said it. However, what's changed between then and now is that hardware has gotten faster, smaller, and most importantly: cheaper. it's now possible to buy a full computer for $5.

    With big companies driving down prices for their own products, it's grown a manufacturing ecosystem capable of producing production-grade hardware that's cheap enough and accessible enough that it is now within reach of normal individuals. This accessibility and affordability are helping drive things like crowdfunding and the maker movement, but they're also giving way to more individuals being able to participate in open source through open source hardware.

  • The IDAR Graph

    UML (Unified Modeling Language)6 is the de facto standard for representing object-oriented designs. It does a fine job of recording designs, but it has a severe problem: its diagrams don't convey what humans need to know, making them hard to understand. This is why most software developers use UML only when forced to.1

    For example, the UML diagrams in figures 1 and 2 portray the embedded software in a fax machine. While these diagrams are attractive, they don't even tell you which objects control which others. Which object is the topmost controller over this fax machine? You don't know. Which object(s) control the Modem object? You don't know.

Leftovers: OSS

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  • Financial services organisations are “waking up” to finding talent through open source

    Symphony, the Google-backed chat tool touted as the “Bloomberg Killer” has the backing of the vast majority of investment banks – Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Citi, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, HSBC, Jefferies, JPMorgan, Morgan Stanley, Nomura and Wells Fargo have all invested – and it now has big asset managers like BlackRock and Citadel.

    While the secure cloud-based chat tool gets most of the headlines, there’s a sister, non-profit organisation called the Symphony Software Foundation, which promotes open-source software collaboration and is quietly capturing the attention of financial services organisations by uncovering coding talent. Gabriele Columbro, an executive director at the firm, says that open source development creates opportunities for developers that just wouldn’t be there otherwise.

  • MapD Open Sources High-Speed GPU-Powered Database
  • MapD Technologies Open Sources Lightning-Fast GPU-Powered Database
  • Open source drives ‘composable infrastructure’

    Today’s software world is growing ever more cloudy and every more fragmented. We have myriad programming languages, numerous application platforms and services-oriented architectures (yes, but not the dusty ones of yesteryear!)

    [...]

    Composable infrastructure is right for this because, for instance, not every data store is right for every customer, he pointed out. And open-source is the source of many of these parts, he said. “Google uses open source to build critical parts of our infrastructure. Google Cloud is an extension of that. Developers will build their own tools using Python or Go… programming languages we invented that are the foundation for cloud computing around containers.”

  • Open source can protect your virtualised network. Here’s how.

    Virtualisation has been a hot topic in telecommunications for nearly half a decade, and security concerns have remained an ever-present feature. This is not surprising given the extent to which NFV/SDN is transforming the industry and the many ‘known unknowns’ this entails.

    As networks migrate from hardware to software, and ‘walled gardens’ turn into much more open cloud-like architectures, so security risks increase.

    Throwing open source software development into the mix adds a further layer of complexity.

  • 3000 Reviews on the ODRS

    The Open Desktop Ratings service is a simple Flask web service that various software centers use to retrieve and submit application reviews. Today it processed the 3000th review, and I thought I should mark this occasion here. I wanted to give a huge thanks to all the people who have submitted reviews; you have made life easier for people unfamiliar with installing software much easier. There are reviews in over a hundred different languages and over 600 different applications have been reviewed.

Events: OpenStack Summit and OSCAL

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OSS
  • OpenStack Summit: The Golden (Channel) Age Of Open Source

    Some of us remember when running any production workload on Linux was considered living dangerously. My, have times changed. Last week, I spent some time at the largest-yet Red Hat Summit, along with about 6,000 other attendees. All three big public cloud vendors had booths on the expo floor — in fact, Microsoft was a platinum sponsor. Cisco, HPE, IBM, Juniper, Oracle and other household names jockeyed for attention with the likes of Big Switch, Black Duck and NuoDB.

  • OPNFV Membership Grows as Community Hosts OPNFV Open Source Day at OpenStack Summit

    OpenStack Summit -- The OPNFV Project, an open source project that facilitates the development and evolution of Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) components across various open source ecosystems through integration, deployment, and testing, today announced China SDN/NFV Industry Alliance, a 50+-member alliance focused on increasing the readiness of SDN/NFV, and Netscout, a leading provider of business assurance, have joined the project.

  • Visiting Kamailio World (Sold Out) and OSCAL’17

    Kamailio World features a range of talks about developing and using SIP and telephony applications and offers many opportunities for SIP developers, WebRTC developers, network operators and users to interact. Wednesday, at midday, there is a Dangerous Demos session where cutting edge innovations will make their first (and potentially last) appearance.

    [...]

    On Saturday I'll be giving a workshop about the Debian Hams project and Software Defined Radio. On Sunday I'll give a talk about Free Real-time Communications (RTC) and the alternatives to systems like Skype, Whatsapp, Viber and Facebook.

MariaDB raises $27.3 Million

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Server
OSS
  • MariaDB raises $27.3 mln

    The European Investment Bank (EIB) announced a EUR 25m funding of MariaDB, the company behind the fastest growing Open Source database, to support the company’s next stage of growth and database innovation. This EIB operation is guaranteed under the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI), a key element of the European Commission’s Investment Plan for Europe, aiming at reviving investment in strategic projects around Europe.

  • MariaDB Raises €25m in Funding

    MariaDB, a Menlo Park, California-based provider of the MariaDB open source database, raised €25m in funding.

    The European Investment Bank (EIB) provided the funding, which is guaranteed under the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI).

  • EIB backs open source database MariaDB with €25m

    The European Investment Bank (EIB) has given €25 million in funding to open source database provider, MariaDB.

    This investment has been offered in order for MariaDB to increase its global client base as part of the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI), a long term plan drafted by the European Commission.

  • Open Source database developer MariaDB picks up $27M from the EIB

    As open source database architecture continues to grow in popularity, one of the bigger developers in the area has picked up some funding to target the opportunity.

  • Open source database MariaDB secures €25m EIB funding

    The European Investment Bank likes what it sees in MariaDB, putting €25m into the open source database for expected growth in the coming years.

    The European Investment Bank’s (EIB) activities throughout the EU have proved quite interesting in recent years.

Upcoming Conferences: ApacheCon and oSC17

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SUSE
  • 3 Developers Explain Why They Attend ApacheCon

    ApacheCon North America is right around the corner. Everyone is looking forward to this year’s event May 16-18 in Miami. There’s plenty new to see, hear, and do this year but that’s not the only attraction for developers.

    The annual conference of The Apache Software Foundation is where users and contributors meet face-to-face to collaborate on the next generation of cloud, Internet, and Big Data tech. The Apache community is huge and has upwards of 4500 committers. There is ample opportunity to meet MVPs and project heroes plus swap war stories with fellow developers in the trenches.

  • Excited about oSC17? Volunteer to experience another aspect of it!

    oSC17 is just around the corner, and if you want to be part of making it awesome you can now sign up to become a volunteer!

    Volunteers are invaluable to conferences, and they play a major role in creating a pleasant conference atmosphere for attendees.

Leftovers: OSS

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  • Red Hat Summit 2017

    A quick recap with self reminders of session links.

    Sunday night was dinner with a couple of other instructors. Always a blast.

    Monday night was the Ansible (Red Hat Management) Social. The venue (Coppersmith) was really cool. Their description is as a vintage warehouse but it looked to me like it had once been a firehouse. The kitchen was in a pair of old food trucks welded together. And there was draft cider.

  • Open Source Firmware For Hoverboards

    2015 was two years ago, and to the surprise of many, we actually had hoverboards at the time. Of course, these weren’t Back to the Future-style hovering skateboards; they were crappy two-wheeled balancing scooters that suffered a few battery explosions and were eventually banned from domestic flights by some carriers. But oh boy, there were some funny Vines of these things.

    While the rest of the world moved on from hoverboards, [Casainho] has been working on Open Sourcing the firmware for these interesting bits of electronics and motors. Now, his work is wrapping up and he has new firmware for electric unicycles and hoverboards.

  • RInside 0.2.14
  • x13binary 1.1.39-1

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Does open source still matter?

    The message to the thousands of participants was clear: the open source development model that brings together creators and users of software to solve business and societal problems is winning.

    From Singapore’s myResponder app that activates volunteers within the vicinity of those suffering from heart attacks to the transformation of government services in Mexico, open source software has sparked some of the world’s most inspiring innovations.

    While these open source powered initiatives are laudable, will they still accomplish their goals if the underlying technologies they are using aren’t open source?

  • Open-source tech disruptive force in computing industry, says IBM

    In today’s world, going alone has few benefits. This is doubly true in the tech industry, as companies who do their own thing don’t just have to reinvent the wheel, but also maintain it forever after. Collaboration and partnerships are key to doing effective business, and a common meeting ground for such collaboration is open-source technology, according to Jim Wasko (pictured), vice president of open systems development at IBM.

  • Welcome, GSoC’17 students!

    Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development during their holiday break. The Document Foundation and LibreOffice participate every year, and we are happy to announce three accepted projects aimed to improve usability.

  • Seneca Open Source researcher's $1-million grant renewed for five years

    With funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Seneca Professor Chris Tyler will build on five years as an Industrial Research Chair for Colleges (IRCC) with expanded research into open source software that can run on low-energy, high-performance computers.

  • Finland’s Oskari GIS platform aims to go global

    Oskari, the online geographic map-building tool that was originally developed by the National Land Survey of Finland, is joining the OSGeo foundation, hoping to become one of the world’s standard open source Geographic Information Solutions. “The Oskari network now includes 33 members, mostly public administrations but also 13 companies, and the software is translated into 14 languages”, said Jani Kylmäaho, head of development at the land survey.

  • Italy creates digital transformation team

    On 24 March, the government of Italy started ‘Developers Italia’ a digital government transformation team and software development community focusing on open source software development. Software solutions and software libraries are to be published on GitHub, published under the MIT licence.

  • 4 ways to measure success in open source communities

Open source NAS, offered as a device or bare PCB, runs Linux on MIPS

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The “GnuBee Personal Cloud 1” open-source NAS device, featuring dual GbE ports and up to six internal 2.5-inch SSDs and/or HDDs, has funded at Crowd Supply.

GnuBee designed its $168 “GnuBee Personal Cloud 1” (GB-PC1) NAS device to provide all the functionality of a commercial, proprietary NAS, “but at a much lower cost and with the transparency, reliability, and accessibility advantages that come with using FLOSS.” The GB-PC1 has just funded at Crowd Supply, and is expected to begin shipping by September.

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Sex, Love & Software: History of Free Software, Linux and Open Source

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GNU
Linux
OSS

A few weeks back, when we featured Brian Lunduke’s interview with Richard Stallman, we lamented the fact that most users who come to GNU/Linux these days seem to have little knowledge of the history of free software, Linux and open source. This is not good, for without a community of supporters, free tech cannot survive.

This is much different than it was 10 or 15 years ago, when the main reason for adopting Linux was because of its connection with the free software movement, which began in the 1980s under Richard Stallman, and spurred on by the GNU Project which he founded.

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews AJ Jordon of gplenforced.org

So basically Bradley Kuhn gave a talk at FOSDEM '17 about GPL enforcement and I was like, wow, it sucks how many companies and people think that enforcing the GPL is a bad idea. I mean, if you disagree with copyleft that's fine (though I personally would argue with that position), but then you should use a suitable license. Like MIT. The very idea that we shouldn't enforce the GPL just doesn't make sense to me because it suggests that the text of the license is watery and unimportant. I don't know about you, but when I say I want my programs to respect users' freedom, I mean it. So GPL enforcement is important. It seemed to me that there are probably a lot of developers out there who want to support GPL enforcement but don't have a good way to voice that support. gplenforced.org is essentially a quick and dirty hack I wrote to make that dead-simple. Read more

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