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OSS

Events: CopyleftConf, LibreOffice Conference, Kubernetes Contributor Summit

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OSS
  • Announcing the Second Annual CopyleftConf!

    Last year's event was the first ever CopyleftConf. It was great! We have some videos up and more are coming. Also, our call for proposals is open now, through the end of the month -- we'd love to hear from you.

    The response was really positive and we're looking forward to putting on a fantastic 2020 event. Because last year's event was so well attended, we've gotten a larger venue for this year.

    Participants from throughout the copyleft world ? developers, strategists, enforcement organizations, scholars and critics ? will be welcomed for an in-depth, high bandwidth, and expert-level discussion about the day-to-day details of using copyleft licensing, obstacles facing copyleft and the future of copyleft as a strategy to advance and defend software freedom for users and developers around the world.

  • Nine more videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Yes, we’ve uploaded some more presentations from the recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain. Many of these cover interoperability between LibreOffice and other office software.

  • Contributor Summit San Diego Schedule Announced!

    There are many great sessions planned for the Contributor Summit, spread across five rooms of current contributor content in addition to the new contributor workshops. Since this is an upstream contributor summit and we don’t often meet, being a globally distributed team, most of these sessions are discussions or hands-on labs, not just presentations. We want folks to learn and have a good time meeting their OSS teammates.

    Unconference tracks are returning from last year with sessions to be chosen Monday morning. These are ideal for the latest hot topics and specific discussions that contributors want to have. In previous years, we’ve covered flaky tests, cluster lifecycle, KEPs (Kubernetes Enhancement Proposals), mentoring, security, and more.

OBS Studio is an open source video recorder and streaming app for Windows, Linux and macOS

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OSS

OBS Studio aka Open Broadcaster Software Studio is very popular among YouTube users. You can use it to broadcast gameplay streams live or use it to record videos (which you may then upload to YouTube or other video hosting sites). Want to set up a camera and mic to record content for your vlog? You can do that too.

This is one of those rare applications that is user-friendly on the one hand but still advanced enough to deliver the options that advanced users require. That being said, we're going to take a look at the basic usage of the program, the recording of on-screen content.

OBS Studio is a cross-platform program that is available for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux.

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KDE Applications 19.08.2 Open-Source Software Suite Released with Many Bug Fixes

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KDE
OSS

Coming a month after the first point release, KDE Applications 19.08.2 is here to address more than 20 bug fixes across a wide range of applications and core components, including Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Kdenlive, Kontact, Konsole, Lokalize, Spectacle, and many others, in an attempt to make the KDE Applications 19.08 open-source software suite more stable and reliable.

Highlights of this release include improvements to High-DPI (HiDPI) support in the Konsole terminal emulator and other apps, the ability to update the search parameters when switching between different searches in the Dolphin file manager, and support for the KMail email client to save messages directly to remote folders.

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Also: Applications 19.08.2

System76 Launches Two Linux Laptops Powered by Coreboot Open-Source Firmware

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Linux
OSS

Driven by the idea that technology should always be free and open, System76 is launching today the Galago Pro and Darter Pro laptops with their new Coreboot-based open-source firmware, which not only makes these computers boot faster than with a proprietary firmware, but it also protects them against various security vulnerabilities and other threats.

"Our lightweight open source firmware gets users from boot screen to desktop 29% faster," said System76. "Removing unnecessary features from the firmware such as network connectivity and execution environments also decreases the potential for vulnerability, meaning users who upgrade to the new laptops will benefit from increased security."

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Also: System76 Will Begin Shipping 2 Linux Laptops With Coreboot-Based Open Source Firmware

System76 launches two Linux with Comet Lake chips and Coreboot

System76 Launches Two Intel Laptops With "Open-Source Firmware" Coreboot

Freedom from censorship on mailing lists

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OSS

One prominent tool used to construct the fake community is the email discussion list.

When people join a discussion list, they assume and believe that they are being exposed to a wide range of opinions. Therefore, when some opinions or critical information is hidden, ordinary members of the list are deceived. People have not consented to this deception.

In 2018, FSFE used these tactics to make it appear that nobody supported elections any more. In 2019, rogue elements of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) staff used the same tactics to undermine their own founder, Richard Stallman. FSF is the organization that explains their use of the word Free using the phrase Free as in speech, not free as in beer. When they don't even allow Free Speech on their own LibrePlanet-discuss mailing list, the organization loses all credibility.

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BleachBit 2.3 Beta

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OSS

When your computer is getting full, BleachBit quickly frees disk space. When your information is only your business, BleachBit guards your privacy. With BleachBit you can free cache, delete cookies, clear Internet history, shred temporary files, delete logs, and discard junk you didn't know was there.

Designed for Linux and Windows systems, it wipes clean thousands of applications including Firefox, Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, and more. Beyond simply deleting files, BleachBit includes advanced features such as shredding files to prevent recovery, wiping free disk space to hide traces of files deleted by other applications, and vacuuming Firefox to make it faster. Better than free, BleachBit is open source.

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Beware open source vendor lock-in

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OSS

With open source having become not only mainstream but also so ubiquitous it is all but invisible, there is a real danger that open source users could find themselves in a whole new world of “open source” vendor lock-in.

That was the warning sounded by Obsidian’s Karl Fisher at the start of LinuxConf [ZA] 2019, a Linux and open source conference which marked the start of Open Source Week in South Africa this week.

Fisher took the delegates, mainly open source aficionados and developers, though a potted evolutionary history of open source – from the days when it was disparaged by Microsoft founder Bill Gates, and later his successor as CEO Steve Ballmer who infamously dubbed Linux a 'cancer'; to Microsoft’s recent, multi-billion dollar acquisition of GitHub, the world’s largest open source code hosting platform.

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TeXstudio - A cushty yet nerdy LaTeX frontend

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OSS
HowTos

TeXstudio is a complex, powerful program, and it definitely appeals to my sense of nerdonics. It's rich in features, and it can take a while before you figure everything out - prior knowledge with similar software definitely helps. But then, I think LyX is friendlier and simpler, especially for beginners. With TeXstudio, there were a few errors throughout my test, which ought to be handled a bit more gracefully. Beamer sounds like a great thing, but then, frankly, most people will make do with Powerpoint, for better or worse.

I definitely intend to spend more time learning TeXstudio, as it may come handy in technical work now and then. Plus, there's the simple joy of mastering difficult tools, which then magically turn repetitive burdens into simple tasks. It's all about the optimization of energy. I believe I'm already there with conventional tools as well as LyX, so this ought to be an interesting experiment. For document lovers among you, this software definitely warrants some extended testing. We're done.

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OSS: LibreOffice et al, OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits, CMS news and Collapse OS

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OSS
  • 8 tech freebies: Firewall, cloud storage, Office software and more

    LibreOffice is a set of open source software that’s equivalent to Microsoft Office. It lets you save and open documents in Microsoft formats and do everything Microsoft Office lets you do, like type in documents, set up spreadsheets and create presentations.

    If you’d like access to Microsoft Office, you can get the free trial of Office 365 for a month or you can try Office Online, a cloud-based version of the Microsoft Office Suite available to those with Microsoft accounts. Whichever software you get, you’ll have some amazing office capabilities without paying any money at all.

  • OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits

    Sometime in the last week OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits (*) upon all our repositories since starting at 1995/10/18 08:37:01 Canada/Mountain. That's a lot of commits by a lot of amazing people.

  • Steve Kemp: A blog overhaul

    All in all the solution was flexible and it wasn't too slow because finding posts via the SQLite database was pretty good.

    Anyway I've come to realize that freedom and architecture was overkill. I don't need to do fancy presentation, I don't need a loosely-coupled set of plugins.

    So now I have a simpler solution which uses my existing template, uses my existing posts - with only a few cleanups - and generates the site from scratch, including all the comments, in less than 2 seconds.

    After running make clean a complete rebuild via make upload (which deploys the generated site to the remote host via rsync) takes 6 seconds.

  • WordPress 5.3 Beta 3

    WordPress 5.3 Beta 3 is now available!

    This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

  • Introducing Collapse OS, a z80 kernel that can be designed with “scavenged parts and program microcontrollers”

    There is a new operating system in the market which is designed in anticipation of the collapse of the current economic system – Collapse OS. The goal of this project is “to be as self-contained as possible.” With a copy of this project, its developer Virgil Dupras says, a capable person will be able to easily build and install Collapse OS without external resources. It will also be possible to build a machine with an exclusive design, and from discarded parts with low-tech tools.

    Dupras believes that the global supply chain will collapse before 2030 and post-collapse, it would be difficult to reproduce most of the electronics due to lack of supply chain. This will make it impossible to bootstrap the new electronic technology and thus limit its growth. At this point, Dupras says, Collapse OS can prove to be a good “starter kit”. He affirms that this operating system can be designed from “scavenged parts and program microcontrollers” with sufficient RAM and storage.

Devs Engage in Soul-Searching on Future of Open Source

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OSS

Companies can choose to build on open source and maintain its balance, said Nousiainen. The future of open source depends on the viewpoints of the potential collaborating organizations.

Issues arise, however, when developers or companies monopolize open source code or use it only for personal gain. Those actions, which alter the original purpose of open source licensing, sparked the current debate.

While open source software is available for public use, Nousiainen said, developers should remember that the work they do is for the benefit of all.

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More in Tux Machines

10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10

For the record, we’ve written a list of ‘things to do after installing Ubuntu’ for the past 20 Ubuntu releases. That’s two lists a year, every year, for a decade — and each list is specifically tailored to each version of Ubuntu. Our rundown for Ubuntu 19.10? Well, it’s no exception! As always: we never suggest you do anything that would damage or harm your install. So for tips on how to butcher Eoan with beta software, unstable drivers, and deep-level config meddling, you’ll need to look elsewhere! Otherwise read on for plenty of useful pointers and pertinent advice on how to get the most from your spangly new Linux system. Let’s go! Read more

today's leftovers

  • Google Ejects Open-Source WireGuard From Android Play Store Over Donation Link In App

    Apparently Google doesn't appreciate donation links/buttons within programs found on the Google Play Store even when it's one of the main sources of revenue for open-source programs. WireGuard has been reportedly dropped over this according to WireGuard lead developer Jason Donenfeld. After waiting days for Google to review the latest version of their secure VPN tunnel application, it was approved and then removed and delisted -- including older versions of WireGuard. The reversal comes on the basis of violating their "payments policy". Of course, Google would much prefer payments be routed through them so they can take their cut...

  • [Older] Sourcehut makes BSD software better

    Every day, Sourcehut runs continuous integration for FreeBSD and OpenBSD for dozens of projects, and believe it or not, some of them don’t even use Sourcehut for distribution! Improving the BSD software ecosystem is important to us, and as such our platform is designed to embrace the environment around it, rather than building a new walled garden. This makes it easy for existing software projects to plug into our CI infastructure, and many BSD projects take advantage of this to improve their software.

    Some of this software is foundational stuff, and their improvements trickle down to the entire BSD ecosystem. Let’s highlight a few great projects that take advantage of our BSD offerings.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (sudo), Debian (libsdl1.2 and libsdl2), Mageia (e2fsprogs, kernel, libpcap and tcpdump, nmap, and sudo), openSUSE (GraphicsMagick and sudo), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, jss, and kernel), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk and java-11-openjdk), Scientific Linux (jss), SUSE (gcc7 and libreoffice), and Ubuntu (leading to a double-free, libsdl1.2, and tiff).

  • Grasp Docker networking basics with these commands and tips

    Docker communicates over network addresses and ports. Within Docker hosts, this occurs with host or bridge networking. With host networking, the Docker host sends all communications via named pipes. This method, however, can pose a security risk, as all traffic flows across the same set of containers with no segregation. The other approach from Docker, bridge networking, provides an internal network that connects to the external one. Use the docker network ls command to see a list of available networks. This command should return results that look similar to the output in Figure 1.

OSS: Events, WordPress and Licensing

  • Director Digital Business Solutions to kick off ApacheCon Europe in Berlin

    The European Commission, a long-time user of open source software, is strengthening its relationship with the Apache Foundation. At the Hackathon in May, the Commission brought together more than 30 developers involved in six different Apache projects. Attendees came from Croatia, Ireland, Poland and Romania, and even from Russia and the United States. At the meeting, many developers met in person for the first time. The hackathon helped the project members build connections and strengthen bonds.

  • FOSSCOMM 2019 aftermath

    FOSSCOMM (Free and Open Source Software Communities Meeting) is a Greek conference aiming at free-software and open-source enthusiasts, developers, and communities. This year was held at Lamia from October 11 to October 13. It is a tradition for me to attend to this conference. Usually I have presentations and of course booths to inform the attendees about the projects I represent. This year the structure of the conference was kind of different. Usually the conference starts on Friday with "beer event". Now it started with registration and a presentation. Personally I made my plan to leave from Thessaloniki by bus. It took me about 4 hours on the road. So when I arrived, I went to my hotel and then waited for Pantelis to go to the University and setup our booths.

  • Automattic Announces Mark Davies as Chief Financial Officer

    Automattic Inc., the parent company of WordPress.com, WooCommerce, and Tumblr, among other products, has announced that Mark Davies has joined the company as Chief Financial Officer. Davies comes to Automattic from Vivint, a $1B+ annual revenue smart home technology company, where he served as chief financial officer since 2013. The news follows Automattic's recent $300 million Series D investment round from Salesforce Ventures, and its acquisition in September of the social blogging platform Tumblr.

  • Empowering Generations of Digital Natives

    Technology is changing faster each year. Digital literacy can vary between ages but there are lots of ways different generations can work together and empower each as digital citizens. No matter whether you’re a parent or caregiver, teacher or mentor, it’s hard to know the best way to teach younger generations the skills needed to be an excellent digital citizen. If you’re not confident about your own tech skills, you may wonder how you can help younger generations become savvy digital citizens. But using technology responsibly is about more than just technical skills. By collaborating across generations, you can also strengthen all your family members’ skills, and offer a shared understanding of what the internet can provide and how to use it to help your neighborhoods and wider society.

  • How to Verify Smart Contracts on Etherscan

    You have your smart contract written, tested, and deployed. However, customers aren’t willing to do business with you unless they know the contract’s source code. After all, it could be set up in a way that’s not in their interest. Thankfully, Etherscan offers a neat tool that allows you to verify smart contracts so interested parties can see the source code and verify for themselves that everything is as it should be. While the process is simple, there are intricacies that might cause problems, especially to people not very familiar with Ethereum and the Solidity programming language.

  • Ethical Open Source: Is the world ready?

    Given its incredible popularity in the marketplace, there is no question that many software developers (and their respective companies) today see great value in using software that is subject to open source licenses. Users focus on the advantages to be had by gaining access, usually at no or minimal charge, to the software’s source code and to the thriving open source community supporting such projects. Powered by a worldwide community supporting the code base, open source code is generally perceived to be more reliable, robust and flexible than so-called proprietary software, with increased transparency leading to better code stability, faster bug fixes, and more frequent updates and enhancements. Historically the question of ethics and open source software (OSS) has mainly focussed on the goal of obtaining and guaranteeing certain “software freedoms,” namely the freedom to use, study, share and modify the software (as exemplified by the Free Software Definition and copyleft licenses such as the GPL family), and to ensure that derivative works were distributed under the same license terms to end “predatory vendor lock-in.”

Programming: SystemView, JDK, VimL and Bazel

  • New SystemView Verification Tool from SEGGER is Compatible with Windows, Linux, and macOS
  • 5 steps for an easy JDK 13 install on Ubuntu
  • Basic Data Types in Python 3: Strings
  • Excellent Free Books to Learn VimL

    VimL is a powerful scripting language of the Vim editor. You can use this dynamic, imperative language to design new tools, automate tasks, and redefine existing features of Vim. At an entry level, writing VimL consists of editing the vimrc file. Users can mould Vim to their personal preferences. But the language offers so much more; writing complete plugins that transform the editor. Learning VimL also helps improve your efficiency in every day editing. VimL supports many common language features: variables, control structures, built-in functions, user-defined functions, expressions first-class strings, high-level data structures (lists and dictionaries), terminal and file I/O, regex pattern matching, exceptions, as well as an integrated debugger. Vim’s runtime features are written in VimL.

  • Google Releases Bazel 1.0 Build System With Faster Build Performance

    Bazel is Google's preferred build system used by many of their own software projects. Bazel is focused on providing automated testing and release processes while supporting "language and platform diversity" and other features catered towards their workflow. Bazel 1.0 comes at a time when many open-source projects have recently been switching to Meson+Ninja as the popular build system these days for its fast build times and great multi-platform build support. Bazel also still has to compete with the likes of CMake and many others.

  • Bazel Reaches 1.0 Milestone!

    Bazel was born of Google's own needs for highly scalable builds. When we open sourced Bazel back in 2015, we hoped that Bazel could fulfill similar needs in the software development industry. A growing list of Bazel users attests to the widespread demand for scalable, reproducible, and multi-lingual builds. Bazel helps Google be more open too: several large Google open source projects, such as Angular and TensorFlow, use Bazel. Users have reported 3x test time reductions and 10x faster build speeds after switching to Bazel.