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OSS

OSS: Streamlio, OpenStack Pike, Apache Kafka, Faces of Open Source, and More

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OSS
  • Streamlio bundles open-source projects into real-time streaming engine for enterprises

    Startup Streamlio Inc. is betting that organizations are ready for real-time streaming architectures to process their basic data needs, and now it has brought three of the latest open-source technologies to bear on the process.

    The company’s new real-time analytics suite incorporates the Apache Pulsar publish-and-subscribe engine with Heron, a real-time, distributed, fault-tolerant stream processing engine originally developed at Twitter Inc. and Apache BookKeeper, a low-latency storage service designed for real-time workloads. The combination is “the only enterprise-grade messaging solution optimized for streaming and storage,” said Streamlio co-founder and Chief Executive Lewis Kaneshiro.

  • Google, Pivotal partner to wield open-source, build consistent target for cloud developers

    Working across clouds can be a tricky business. A company’s clouds might come from different providers, run in private or in public, or just be highly customized to work with mission-critical legacy applications.

  • OpenStack Pike Cloud Platform Still Provides AWS Compatibility Layer

    The latest release of the OpenStack cloud platform landed on Aug. 30 with the debut of OpenStack Pike. While there are many incremental feature improvements in Pike, there is at least one key feature noteworthy in that it hasn't been removed. That feature is Amazon Web Services (AWS) API compatibility.

    Though the OpenStack Foundation and its member companies rarely talk about AWS compatibility, it's a feature OpenStack has long supported.

  • 3 industries relying on Apache Kafka

    Apache Kafka is a distributed publish-subscribe messaging system designed to be fast, scalable, and durable. It provides a unified, high-throughput, low-latency platform for handling real-time data feeds and has a storage layer that is essentially a massively scalable pub/sub message queue architected as a distributed transaction log. That architecture makes Kafka, which was originally developed by LinkedIn and made open source in early 2011, highly valuable for enterprise infrastructures to process streaming data.

    Originally, Kafka was built for website activity tracking—capturing all the clicks, actions, or inputs on a website and enabling multiple "consumers" to subscribe to real-time updates of that information. Now, however, companies in internet services, financial services, entertainment, and other industries have adapted Kafka's massively scalable architecture and applied it to valuable business data.

  • The Faces of Open Source: Jim Wright

    Jim is a powerhouse of knowledge in open source. He is fully versed in technical issues and deeply experienced in legal matters, both visible immediately in his quick, easy and comprehensive commentary around virtually any open source-related subject. Our discussion was framed by the same three questions as all the others in season one: how did he enter open source? what was the most interesting thing he observed? what did he think we should keep our eyes open for in the next 12 to 24 months? What stood out is perhaps how Jim tied his answers to the longer history of open source itself, and framed his answers in the content of our 20 plus year evolution as a community.

    One thing that Jim’s interview highlighted was that there was plenty of scope for deeper, more comprehensive interviews as we explored open source law, and he helped set the tone that would see a decision to shoot long-form interviews in the forthcoming series two.

  • FOSScamp Syros 2017 – day 3

    The 3rd day should have started with a Debian sprint and then a LibreOffice one, taking advantage I’m still attending, as that’s my last day. But plans don’t always work out and we started 2 hours later. When everybody arrive we got everyone together for a short daily meeting (scrum style). The people were divided to 3 teams for translating:  Debian Installer, LibreOffice and Gnome. For each team we did a short list of what left and with what to start. And in the end – how does what so there will be no toe stepping. I was really proud with this and felt it was time well spent.

  • Open Source EHR Generator Delivers Healthcare Big Data with FHIR

    Healthcare data analysts frustrated by the lack of access to large volumes of clean, trusted, and complete patient data can now take advantage of an open source EHR data generator platform called Synthea.

    One million synthetic patient records are currently available within the free online system, which uses HL7 FHIR to allow access to standardized datasets that mimic real electronic health records. 

    The wealth of easily accessible data may be a boon for the growing fields of machine learning and artificial intelligence, which require access to significant amounts of big data in order to train for clinical decision support, predictive analytics, and other patient care applications.

  • Court Ruling Adds New Power to Open Source Licenses

    Any organization using open source source software should make sure there is a strong open source policy in place that dots the "I"s and crosses the "T"s. Why? Because open source licenses recently became even more enforceable than they were already.

    For some time case law has made them enforceable in copyright cases. Now, with a federal district court ruling in Artifex vs. Hancom, they're clearly enforceable in contract disputes as well.

    First a little history.

    For a long time after Richard Stallman penned the first General Public License in 1989, there was a cloud with a question mark inside hanging over all open source projects. No one knew whether the license would be legally enforceable. When consulted, legal eagles were pretty much in agreement that they should be enforceable -- with the caveat that lawyers and judges have sometimes disagreed on seemingly clear points of law. Until there was a court case centered on their enforceability, they said, open source projects were in limbo.

  • Licensing woes

    On releasing modified versions of GPLv3 software in binary form only...

Next US Elections: Open Source vs. Commercial Software?

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OSS

Meanwhile, the city this year will pay Dominion Voting Systems $2.3 million to renew its contract for the company's proprietary voting machine software. That system is nearing the end of its life cycle.

Officials hope a move to open source will make San Francisco's voting software more transparent and secure, as well as less costly. The expectation is that an open source voting machine program would offer more security against hack attacks. If the city should develop its own system, it then could provide the code to other cities.

Read more

Openwashing and Fakes

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Microsoft
OSS

OSS: CyberArk, Eric Raymond, Ohio Supercomputer Center, and TraneAi

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OSS
  • CyberArk Launches Open Source Secrets Management Solution for DevOps
  • Eric S. Raymond: Heirloom Software: the Past as Adventure

    Through the years, I've spent what might seem to some people an inordinate amount of time cleaning up and preserving ancient software. My Retrocomputing Museum page archives any number of computer languages and games that might seem utterly obsolete. 

    [...]

     For a work of art that was the first of its genre, ADVENT's style seems in retrospect startlingly mature. The authors weren't fumbling for an idiom that would later be greatly improved by later artists more sure of themselves; instead, they achieved a consistent (and, at the time, unique) style that would be closely emulated by pretty much everyone who followed them in text adventures, and not much improved on as style even though the technology of the game engines improved by leaps and bounds, and the range of subjects greatly widened.

  • Ohio Supercomputer Center Releases Open Source HPC Access Portal

    An innovative web-based portal for accessing high performance computing services has matured beyond the beta phase and now is available to HPC centers worldwide.The Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) has launched Open OnDemand 1.0, an open-source version of OSC OnDemand, the Center’s online, single-point-of-entry application for HPC services.

  • Ready, Set, $50M ICO! TraneAi Funding Open Source AI-Training Blockchain Ecosystem

    TraneAi, an emerging player in the rapidly expanding artificial-intelligence market, announced that it will offer the sale of $50 million in tokens to seed its decentralized, open-source AI-development ecosystem built on blockchain technology.

CyberArk open-sources Conjur

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OSS
Security
  • CyberArk open-sources Conjur

    Security vendor CyberArk has released an open-source version of its Conjur secrets management software.

    CyberArk Conjur enables DevOps teams to automatically secure and manage secrets used by machines and users to protect containerised and cloud-native applications across the DevOps pipeline, company officials said.

  • Open-source stewardship key as CyberArk moves to help devs avoid another Heartbleed

    Conjur’s credential-management technology includes specific functionality for securely managing ‘secrets’ – access keys, privileged account credentials, API keys, and other sensitive information – and Lawler expects that the release of CyberArk Conjur Community Edition to the open-source community will drive a flurry of innovation that will further raise the level of open-source security overall.

Free Software and Open Access

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OSS
  • Coinbase’s GDAX announces open source library of cryptocurrency trading tools

    San Francisco-based Coinbase has announced that its professional based exchange Global Digital Asset Exchange (GDAX) has introduced the ‘GDAX Trading Toolkit (GTT)’ an open source library for trading digital currency across a variety of exchanges.

    The GTT provides a suite of tools for traders to design, create, and operate trading features such as automated trading bots and personal portfolio trackers.

  • The Washington Post starts using Talk, an open-source tool for improving online comments

    An open-source tool called Talk is being rolled out on The Washington Post website starting today (6 September), to help reimagine the online commenting experience for both the newsroom and readers.

    The tool is developed by The Coral Project, a joint initiative from Mozilla, Washington Post and The New York Times, initially supported by the Knight Foundation and funded by the Democracy Fund, the Rita Allen Foundation, and Mozilla.

    Talk is currently live on three sections on washingtonpost.com – business, politics and The Switch blog. Over the coming weeks, it will become more widely available on The Washington Post, and other organisations such as Fairfax Media titles in Australia will start using it.

    The tool, which launched in beta in March and is currently on its third version, can be installed by any newsroom using the available documentation, and more features are being added regularly.

  • European Libraries’ Five Principles For Open Access Negotiations With Publishers

    European research libraries have issued five principles for libraries to use when holding open access negotiations with publishers, seeking to prevent over-charging and promote transparency and sustainable access.

  • Open educational resources can offer relief from high textbook prices

    Timbo X. Spartan is your typical MSU student. He goes to Economics 201 and Spanish 202 on Monday and Wednesday, and ISS 215 and Accounting 201 on Tuesday and Thursday.

    According to the Student Book Store's current listings, the required texts for these courses would have our friend Timbo spending $100 on economics, $88 on Spanish, $160 on the ISS course and $187 on accounting. This adds up to $535 in materials for one semester.

    Of course, this is all hypothetical, but not unrealistic. Chemical engineering sophomore Megan Richardson has spent more than $400 on materials for classes this semester and isn't finished shopping yet.

    "Last year I spent close to $300 on one chemistry textbook," Richardson said. "This is on the higher end of what I've spent so far, but yeah. It's kind of ridiculous."

Servers: MAAS, Logging, and Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) Open OnDemand 1.0

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Server
OSS
  • MAAS Development Update – Aug 21st – Set 1st
  • A checklist for building your enterprise logging layer

    In any discussion about big-picture topics such as cloud migration services, data centers, and microservices, the topic of enterprise logging can get relegated to an afterthought. But you do so at your peril, because without logging, you won't have critical visibility into your services in order to diagnose and debug efficiently. What's more, if you're a large enterprise, you may be violating compliance requirements.

  • Ohio Supercomputer Center releases open-source HPC access portal

    An innovative web-based portal for accessing high performance computing services has matured beyond the beta phase and now is available to HPC centers worldwide.

    The Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) has launched Open OnDemand 1.0, an open-source version of OSC OnDemand, the Center's online, single-point-of-entry application for HPC services.

    Open OnDemand is an NSF-funded project to develop a widely shareable web portal that provides HPC centers with advanced web and graphical interface capabilities. Through OnDemand, HPC clients can upload and download files, create, edit, submit and monitor jobs, run GUI applications and connect via SSH, all via a web browser, with no client software to install and configure.

Chrome 61 Released, Mozilla Firefox Bugfix for GNU/Linux

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Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • New in Chrome 61
  • Chrome 61 Brings WebUSB, JavaScript Modules & More
  • Chrome 61 Enters Stable Channel, Now Rolling Out For Windows, Mac and Linux

    Chrome 61 has finally entered the stable channel with a slew of developer-focused features and general security fixes. The desktop version for Chrome 61 has started rolling out today, available for Mac, Windows, and Linux. It brings the latest WebUSB API, which enables web apps to interact with computer peripherals like keyboards, mice and printers.

  • Google Chrome 61 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    Today Google launched version 61 of the Chrome browser for Windows, Mac, and Linux. With this release, we have 21 security updates, numerous improvements and bug fixes, and three APIs that allow developers to further enhance their sites and apps.

  • Mozilla Firefox Finally Fixes An Awkward, 11 Year Old Linux Bug

    It's taken more than a decade, but after enough user complaints, there is finally a patch queued for Firefox 57 to fix an arguably annoying default behavior of Firefox on Linux/Unix systems.

    The default setting on Firefox has long been when the middle mouse button is clicked to open an URL based upon the contents of the clipboard. Most users don't expect this behavior by default and many have found it to be incredibly awkward accidentally opening a new tab with some web-page based upon what's in your copy-paste clipboard.

OSS: TensorFlow, Penn, Voting in San Francisco, ReText, Linux Mint 18.3 Backup Tool

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OSS
  • TensorFlow brings machine learning to the masses

    You might think that adopting deep learning or machine learning (ML) techniques means hiring a fleet of cutting edge data scientists with PhDs, but this simply is not true. Creating new deep learning models and theories is hard, but using the existing, popular deep learning models is not rocket science. In fact, a typical IT engineer can learn the basics of ML, including how to integrate and use the well-known ML and deep learning algorithms and techniques, to build an ML solution. In short, a company’s IT engineers can be trained to become ML engineers.

  • Jacquelyn Sussman | Didn't read the PRP? Penn didn't either

    The Objectivist | Why Penn needs to seriously consider open-sourcing

    [...]

    Take GitHub as an example: According to the GitHub blog and GrowthHackers, the open-source code repository was founded in 2008 and rose from a $750 million valuation in 2012 to a $2 billion valuation as of 2015 due to its increase in revenues and large user base. Its customers include tech giants Amazon, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, all of which rely on this free and public repository to quickly and easily share code and other information.

  • San Francisco May Use Open Source Voting System

    The city of San Francisco’s local government may be the first one to use an open source voting system. If the city manages to complete the process successfully, it will be the first place in the country to use open source voting. It is something that has been considered by many people for years but recently $300,000 has been set aside to study the possibility.

    Elections Director John Arntz has opened discussions with the consulting group Slalom which will create a report about open source voting. It is expected to be completed by January. It is slated to cost $175,000 and focus on what San Francisco might encounter if it chooses to go through with such a system.

  • San Francisco investigates open source voting system
  • Why open source success is increasingly dependent on corporate cash [Ed: Mac Asay puts money before freedom; Because he doesn't grasp the goals of FOSS (not market share)]
  • ReText: Another Great Markdown and reStructuredText Editor for Linux

    ReText is a simple and powerful editor for Markup languages (such as reStructuredText and Markdown), it is written in Python programming language. It is basically compiled for Linux and other POSIX compatible platforms, theoretically it can work on other operating systems as well but you have to port it by yourself. Since it is in active development you can submit bugs if find at any point.
    You can control its output formatting. The files it works with are plain text files, however it can export to PDF, HTML and other formats.

  • Linux Mint Brings Big Improvements to its Backup Tool

    An improved backup tool will debut in Linux Mint 18.3. The updated utility will be easier to use, feature performance improvements, and more.

OSS: OpenProject in OSI, FOSS Events, and Women in Technology/Computing

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Development
OSS
  • OpenProject Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the founding organization of the open source software movement, announced that the OpenProject Foundation has joined the global non-profit as an Affiliate Member. OpenProject joins a who's who of global open source projects and foundations in support of software freedom, including Drupal Association, Eclipse Foundation, Linux Foundation, Mozilla Foundation, Wordpress Foundation, Wikimedia, and many more. The OSI Affiliate Member Program allows any non-profit community, organization or institution—unequivocally independent groups with a clear commitment to open source—to join the OSI in support of its mission to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and to build bridges among different constituencies in the open source community.

  • Randa Approaches

    Later this week, I’m leaving for Zurich, and from there I’ll take the train up to Randa (up, in the sense that I live at sea level, and Randa is the length of one million micro-SD cards laid end-to-end higher).

    In Randa, I’ll be working as a KDE developer, and as a Calamares developer, and learning about accessibility tooling. There’s about 60 hacking hours in that week. I’ll also be working as the cook, for one day. There’s about 12 cooking hours in a day, since feeding 30 people takes a lot of vegetable-chopping, bread-slicing, and dish-washing.

  • FOSScamp Syros 2017 – day 2

    The morning stated by taking the bus to Kini beach. After some to enjoy the water (which were still cold in the morning), we sat for talking about the local Debian community and how can we help it grow. The main topic was localization (l10n), but we soon started to check other options. I reminded them that l10n isn’t only translation and we also talked about dictionaries for spell checking, fonts and local software which might be relevant (e.g. hdate for the Jewish/Hebrew calendar or Jcal for the Jalali calendar). For example it seems that regular Latin fonts are missing two Albanian characters.

    We also talked about how to use Open Labs to better work together with two hats – member of the local FOSS community and also as members of various open source projects (not forgetting open content / data ones projects as well). So people can cooperate both on the local level, the international level or to mix (using the other’s project international resources). In short: connections, connections, connections.

  • GnuPG Financial Results for 2016
  • ‘Women Were in Fact Pioneers in Computing Work’

    When a white male Google employee was fired after the release of a memo in which he complained about efforts to increase gender or racial diversity because employment gaps in tech may be due in part to “biological differences” which are “universal across human culture”—woman like feelings more than ideas, that sort of thing—this is not indication that, as USA Today hyperventilated, “the hot button issue of gender bias in the workplace has just gone thermonuclear.” It did provide occasion for the airing of some old ideas involving sexism and scientism, presented as somehow new, because technology.

  • a new interview question

    Obviously if you discover a person that thinks that gender imbalance is just the way it is and that nothing can or should be done about it, or that women don't program well, or the like, then that's a great result: clear no-hire. This person is likely to make life unpleasant for their female colleagues, and your company just avoided the problem. High fives, interview team!

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Android Leftovers

Linux-driven Sitara SiP module shrinks to 21mm square

Octavo’s OSD335x-SM is a 40 percent smaller version of its AM335x-based OSD335x SiP that adds a 4KB EEPROM. There’s also a compact, open-spec dev board. Last year, Octavo Systems added a new twist to BeagleBone development when it released its 27 x 27mm OSD335x System-In-Package (SiP) module. The OSD335x, which went on to form the basis of the BeagleBone Black Wireless and BeagleBone Blue SBCs, packs a Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x SoC and nearly all the functions of a BeagleBone Black SBC into a BGA module. Octavo has now followed up with a 40 percent smaller OSD335x-SM variant that measures 21 x 21mm (441 sq. mm). Read more

today's leftovers

  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP
    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update. Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes. The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay. Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.
  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features
    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.
  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?
    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?
  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next
    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next. The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.
  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots
    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports. If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.
  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet
    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.
  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret
    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were. Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue). The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

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