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OSS

Linux and FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS
  • DevConf.cz 2017

    Another edition of DevConf.cz took place last week. It was already the second edition I didn’t organize. This year, I was involved in the organization even less, just helping with the program and serving as a session chair for one day. So I could enjoy the conference more than ever before.

  • PyLadies Pune Meetup - February 2016

    The PyLadies Pune February Meetup was held on 6th Feb at reserved-bit. Kushal took a session on MicroPython on the MicroBit boards. Thanks to @ntoll for sending over the MicroBits for workshops.

  • PyCon India 2016

    Heya! First of all I’m really sorry for such a delay with PyCon India 2016 blog post.

  • Using Mesos to Drive Devops Adoption at Scale at GSShop
  • From Yawn-Driven Deployment to DevOps Tipping Point

    GS Shop is one of the largest TV shopping networks in Asia, and one of the largest e-commerce sites in Korea with more than 1000 employees and 1.5 million users daily. Vivek Juneja of GS Shop's Container Platform Team, at MesosCon Asia 2016, shares how he and his team moved this behemoth to the new agile way of running the datacenter.

    We know that change is not easy, and Juneja shares many valuable insights in how to successfully manage completely revamping your IT department. Progress is hard even when the old way is difficult. Juneja describes their old practice of "yawn-driven deployment": "We practice something called Yawn-Driven Deployment, deploying at 3:00 a.m. That's what we were doing for a long time. Everybody gets together at 3:00 a.m. It's a party. We deploy, and we have a lot of yawns, and that code goes to production." Nobody really like working this way, but it's what they are used to.

  • Redox OS, MINIX, Hurd & Genode Had Their Time At FOSDEM Too

    While Linux is the most prominent operating system each year at the Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting (FOSDEM), it's not a conference limited to just Linux. Once again there was a developer room dedicated to other operating systems like the Rust-written Redox OS.

  • FOSDEM 2017 is finished...

    One big job that needs to happen after the conference is to review and release the video recordings that were made. With several hundreds of videos to be checked and only a handful of people with the ability to do so, review was a massive job that for the past three editions took several months; e.g., in 2016 the last video work was done in July, when the preparation of the 2017 edition had already started.

  • [diaspora] The state of diaspora* and the decentralized social world

    The decentralized social world is on. It's been four years since the project was transferred to its community. Discover with us what we accomplished and where we'd like to go.

  • My BSD sucks less than yours

    Instead of speaking about successful parts of the projects, this talk will focus on the weakness of both OpenBSD and FreeBSD, exploring conceptual differences between them and also exploring directions where motivated contributors can start working on to improve the projects. While being general purpose operating systems we will see that one size doesn't fit all and how one or the other may be a better solution to a particular problem. Trolls are to be left at the door.

Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS

OSS in the Back End

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Server
OSS

Kodi 17 Krypton Open-Source Media Center Officially Released, Here's What's New

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OSS

The Kodi team proudly announced today, February 5, 2017, the general availability of the final release of the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source media center for Linux, Android, macOS, iOS, and Windows.

Read more

Also: Kodi 17 Released With New Default Skin, Better Live TV Support

LibreELEC 8.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Now Based on Final Kodi 17 "Krypton"

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Opening up ECOMP: Our Network Operating System for SDN

    Harmonizing SDN and NFV technologies benefits all communications industry members. It takes unnecessary friction out of the system. It gives service providers more control of their network services. It also enables both developers and operators to create effective services at speeds never before possible.

  • TM Forum finds lack of ‘glue’ challenging telecom’s open source efforts

    Has the rash of new open source-focused organizations hindered the deployment of open source solutions or is it just a lack of cohesion?

    One issue facing the telecommunication industry’s move towards greater use of open source software platforms is the dizzying array of organizations that have sprung up over the past couple of years focused on trying to help that transition. While the help is appreciated, it would seem that too much help could be confusing the process.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.0 Released and Available via PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Released: The Biggest Release So Far

    Finally after a long waiting. The Document Foundation announced the release of LibreOffice 5.3. Which fairly can be considered a huge release full of updates and new features for the free office suite.

  • Freenas 10 Beta 2 released
  • [Older] [was paywalled] The trouble with FreeBSD

    Benno Rice, a member of the FreeBSD core team, might be expected to feel out of place at linux.conf.au, but it was not his first time there. While at the 2016 event in Geelong, he saw a presentation on Rust community automation [YouTube] by Emily Dunham and wondered: why can't FreeBSD have such nice things? The 2017 conference, held in Hobart, chose "the future of open source" as its theme but, Rice said, he was there to speak about the past; by looking at how FreeBSD ran into trouble, perhaps we can all learn something useful about how we run our projects.

    He got involved with open source in the 1990s; he actually started with Linux, but somebody told him that "Linux is rubbish" and he should use FreeBSD instead. So he bought an iMac computer and got FreeBSD running on it; the project then punished him by giving him commit access. It is a great project, but it does have some problems relating to three factors in particular: FreeBSD is big, it's old, and its leadership can be slow to act.

    How big is FreeBSD? The project's Subversion repository is currently about 3.1GB in size; a checked-out tree takes about 600MB. It consists of 71,100 files, about 32 million lines of code. It takes 20-30 minutes to build the whole thing, which is a big improvement from the old days, when it could take several hours.

  • [Video] Richard Stallman Explains Everything

    Richard Stallman, Founder and Leader of the free software movement, joins David to discuss his creation of the computer operating system "GNU"...

  • From free software to liberal software

    Robert M. "r0ml" Lefkowitz was the fourth and final keynote speaker at linux.conf.au 2017 in Hobart, Tasmania. He immediately served notice that his talk was going to differ from those of his predecessors; they offered "deep insightful questions", while he had answers. Also, the first three were nice people. What followed was an energetic event that left many in the audience wondering what they had just witnessed. The future of free and open-source software is grim, he said, but maybe we can make something better to replace it.

  • OGP unveils catalogue of open government tools

    The Open Government Partnership has published the OGP Toolbox, aggregating the digital tools developed and used by organisations across the globe to improve democracy and promote openness. So far, it lists 1,266 tools, 189 use cases and 515 organisations.

  • New Dataset: Five Years of Longitudinal Data from Scratch

    Scratch is a block-based programming language created by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group (LLK) at the MIT Media Lab. Scratch gives kids the power to use programming to create their own interactive animations and computer games. Since 2007, the online community that allows Scratch programmers to share, remix, and socialize around their projects has drawn more than 16 million users who have shared nearly 20 million projects and more than 100 million comments. It is one of the most popular ways for kids to learn programming and among the larger online communities for kids in general.

  • GitLab.com luckily found lost data on a staging server

    GitLab.com, the wannabe GitHub alternative that yesterday went down hard and reported data loss, has confirmed that some data is gone but that its services are now operational again.

    The incident did not result in Git repos disappearing. Which may be why the company's PR reps characterised the lost data as “peripheral metadata that was written during a 6-hour window”. But in a a prose account of the incident, GitLab says “issues, merge requests, users, comments, snippets, etc.” were lost. The Register imagines many developers may not be entirely happy with those data types being considered peripheral to their efforts.

Events: WikiToLearn India, FOSDEM 2017, MesosCon

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OSS
  • A look back at the WikiToLearn India conference, 2017

    The first ever WikiToLearn India conference was a 2 day single track event held on the 18th and 19th of January, 2017 in Jaipur, India. The event welcomed talks from all domains of technology, but admittedly, talks around KDE and MediaWiki were preferred.

  • Almost at FOSDEM. Video volunteers?

    The Desktops DevRoom will be a blast again this year. While I have been in charge of it for 6? years already, the last two (since my twins) were born I had organized remotely and local duties were carried on by the Desktops DevRoom team (thank you Christophe Fergeau, Philippe Caseiro and others!).

  • Kube at FOSDEM 2017

    I haven’t talked about it much, but the last few months we’ve been busy working on Kube and we’re slowly closing in on a first tech preview.

  • Share Apache Mesos Best Practices, Lessons Learned, and More at MesosCon Events in 2017

    MesosCon is an annual conference held in three locations around the globe and organized by the Apache Mesos community in partnership with The Linux Foundation. The events bring together users and developers of the open source orchestration framework to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem.

    The MesosCon program committee is now seeking proposals from speakers with fresh ideas, enlightening case studies, best practices, or deep technical knowledge to share with the Apache Mesos community at MesosCon North America, Asia, and Europe in 2017.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Report: SDN, NFV, and open source: the operator’s view

    Our library of 1700 research reports is available only to our subscribers. We occasionally release ones for our larger audience to benefit from. This is one such report. If you would like access to our entire library, please subscribe here. Subscribers will have access to our 2017 editorial calendar, archived reports and video coverage from our 2016 and 2017 events.

  • NFV Interoperability Testing Needs to Accelerate

    Plus, vendors that have made major investments in MANO platforms for NFV environments are also validating NFV interoperability across their platforms. HPE, for example, has an OpenNFV partner program through which it tests and validates NFV interoperability.

  • Update on San Francisco's Open Source Voting System!

    As many may know, the OSI has been involved in supporting the adoption of an open source elections system in San Francisco, California. The following is an update from Chris Jerdonek, Elections Commissioner & President of the San Francisco Elections Commission.

    We'd like to thank Chris for all of his hard work in raising awareness of open source software and its value for elections as well as keeping all of us up to date on the latest developments. If you'd like to learn more about the project, please contact Chris directly.

  • 4 questions to answer when choosing community metrics to measure

    Thus far in the Community Metrics Playbook column, I've discussed the importance of setting goals to guide the metrics process, outlined the general types of metrics that are useful for studying your community, and reviewed technical details of available tools. As you are deciding which metrics to track for your community, having a deeper understanding of each area is important so you not only choose good metrics, but also understand and plan for what to do when the numbers don't line up with expectations.

  • a2k17 hackathon report: Patrick Wildt on the arm64 port
  • House Bill Would Curb Open Data on Race, Affordable Housing

    Open data supporters have expressed trepidation over a new House bill that states Federal agencies will no longer be able to use geospatial information to create open databases on racial disparities and affordable housing.

    HR 482, or the Local Zoning Decisions Protection Act of 2017, moved to the House Committee on Financial Services on Jan. 12. Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, sponsored the bill, which would render Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) ineffective. AFFH, a 2015 ruling of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), requires certain HUD grantees to conduct an Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH) planning process.

  • Wallonia claims success for its Digital Strategy

    Wallonia wants to modernise government service delivery and make it ‘digital by default’. It has created a online enterprise portal, aggregating 18 existing services. It has also made the first 150 government data sets publicly available on its open data portal and overhauled its geoportal, providing access to all of the region’s geodata.

  • How the University of Hawaii is solving today's higher ed problems

    Openness invites greater participation and it takes advantage of the shared energy of collaborators. The strength of openly created educational resources comes paradoxically from the vulnerability of the shared experience of that creation process.

    One of the leaders in Open Educational Resources (OER) is Billy Meinke, educational technologist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The University's open creation model uses Pressbooks, which Billy tells me more about in this interview.

  • Hitchhiker's Guide to Serverless JavaScript

    Although Serverless has become a bit of a buzzword recently, Steven Faulkner, Director of Platform Engineering at Bustle, disagrees that it is just a fad. In his talk at Node.js Interactive, he points out that much of the faults that people find in Serverless -- that it doesn't scale, that it is not production ready, that it’s too slow and expensive -- are provenly false.

  • Hitchhiker's Guide to"'Serverless" Javascript by Steven Faulkner, Bustle

    This talk from Node.js Interactive provides concrete knowledge of what going serverless really means, so you can decide if it makes sense for your own infrastructure.

WordPress Addons

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OSS
Web
  • 8 Essential WordPress Plugins Your Website Must Have

    WordPress, what a CMS right? So many available plugins, themes, and tutorials. More than 27% of world websites are powered by a WordPress CMS. A staggering statistic which kinda indicates the level of functionality and flexibility it offers to webmasters. A complete website solution with an easy-to-use aura surrounding it.

    Chances are that while you are reading this another WordPress website has been launched into the vast ocean of information we call the Internet. Hell, you’ve probably reached this article by researching about WordPress after hearing that Joe from high school is making tons of money with his WordPress sites.

  • WordPress Updates in CentOS 7 + Apache + SELinux

    A couple of weeks ago I moved my WordPress blogs from a trivial shared hosting to a more sophisticated VPS running CentOS 7 since I was in search of more flexibility from my server.

    During these days, I learned a lot about managing a web server on my own and I’m still currently learning a ton of interesting things about this topic.

    One of the most annoying problems I faced a couple of days ago concerned, in particular, my WordPress installation. Everytime I was trying to update its core and plugins, the dashboard showed me a message similar to this...

Open Source ECOMP

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OSS
  • Why Open Source ECOMP? AT&T Needs the Help

    AT&T’s ECOMP platform is in production but needs more maturation. Without that progression, the carrier won’t be able to make its goal of virtualizing 75 percent of its network functions by 2020.

  • AT&T ECOMP released to open source community through The Linux Foundation

    AT&T made good on its plans to release its ECOMP SDN and NFV platform into the open source community through The Linux Foundation.

    AT&T officially moved on its plans to migrate its enhanced control, orchestration, management and policy platform into the open source community through The Linux Foundation.

    The carrier said the move includes the release of source code, documentation, educational videos and a pair of sample use cases – one on virtual firewall and one on virtual domain name servers – into a public cloud for access to users and covered by the Apache 2.0 license. The code itself is said to use a continuous integration and continuous development environment and include 11 different modules set up as separate virtual machines with code in at least one container.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

New/Imminent Releases: Black Lab Linux, Exton|Defender, Mageia

  • Black Lab Linux 8.1 Released
    Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8.1. Our first incremental release to the 8.0 series. In this release we have brought all security updates up to Feb 15, 2017 as well as application updates.
  • Exton|Defender Super Rescue System Is Now Based on Fedora 25 and Cinnamon 3.2.8
    GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is announcing the availability of a new build of his Exton|Defender SRS (Super Rescue System) Live DVD/USB designed for those who want to do various administrative tasks on their PCs. Based on the 64-bit version of the Fedora 25 operating system, Exton|Defender SRS Build 170218 comes with up-to-date tools that let you administrate and repair your operating system after a disaster. It's now powered by the Linux 4.9.9 kernel and uses the gorgeous Cinnamon 3.2.8 desktop environment by default.
  • Mageia 6 Has Been Running Months Behind Schedule, But It's Still Coming
    Samuel Verschelde of the Mandrake/Mandriva-forked Mageia Linux distribution has put out a blog post concerning the state of Mageia 6. The last Mageia 6 test release was in June of last year and their next Mageia 6 "stabilization snapshot" has been repeatedly delayed for months.
  • So where is Mageia 6?
    There is no mystery about it, we are totally off schedule. The last preview we published for Mageia 6 was Stabilization Snapshot 1 in June 2016, and Stabilization Snapshot 2 still hasn’t been published, although we have been saying “soon” for weeks, or even months! So what’s going on? Is Mageia dead? Fortunately not. But it’s good that you worry about it because it shows you like your Linux distribution. We need to communicate about the state of things so that you can stop worrying, so here we are.

5 Signs That Show You’re a Linux Geek

While Linux is certainly very easy to use, there are some activities surrounding it that are seen as more complex than others. While they can be all be avoided easily enough, they do have a certain, geeky appeal. How many of them do you follow? Read more

Top 5 best rising Linux distros in 2017

Linux is built for tinkering and experimentation, which means it’s always morphing and changing. New distros are popping up all the time, because all it takes is a little bit of determination, time and effort to create a custom operating system. Not all of them hit the mark – there are stacks of Linux distros that have seen little to no action, and we’re almost certain that some have been released and never installed by anyone other than their creator. Other alternative distros, though, fare rather better. Look at the success of Linux Mint, which spun off from Ubuntu to become (at times) arguably more popular than its own parent. Indeed, Ubuntu itself grew from Debian, and its niche offshoots (distros like Ubuntu Studio) have seen good movement. If there’s a market out there for your distro, there’s traction to be had. So let’s look at our pick of the five distros moving up swiftly through the ranks as of early 2017. Some of these might become the best Linux distros out there, some might turn out to be awful – but it won’t cost you a penny to try them out. Read more