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OSS

OpenStack in Sydney

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Server
OSS
  • OpenStack to tackle open source integration

    The OpenStack Foundation made its announcement, kicking off the OpenStack Summit currently running in Sydney at the Darling Harbour International Convention Centre.

  • OpenStack Summit Sydney Spotlights Open Infrastructure Integration
  • OpenStack says its work is largely done. Now your hard work can fill in the blanks

    The OpenStack Foundation has kicked off its summit in Sydney, Australia, with a call to current OpenStack users to help it to win more users by sharing code they've written to link OpenStack to other tools and infrastructure.

    The Foundation's decided the time is right to pursue easier integration because it feels the core of OpenStack is in good shape: its myriad modules are felt to be nicely mature and to offer the functionality that users need and want.

  • WeChat parent company Tencent joins the OpenStack Foundation as a Gold Member

    Shenzhen-based Tencent Holdings Limited, the parent company behind extremely popular services like WeChat and QQ, today announced that it is joining the OpenStack Foundation as a Gold Member. OpenStack members at the Gold level pay annual dues of 0.025 percent of their revenue with a minimum of $50,000 per year and a maximum of $200,000 to support the development of the open source cloud platform.

  • OpenStack® Board Elects Tencent as Gold Member of the Foundation
  • Sydney OpenStack Summit - Started
  • OpenStack’s next mission: bridging the gaps between open source projects

    OpenStack, the massive open source project that provides large businesses with the software tools to run their data center infrastructure, is now almost eight years old. While it had its ups and downs, hundreds of enterprises now use it to run their private clouds and there are even over two dozen public clouds that use the project’s tools. Users now include the likes of AT&T, Walmart, eBay, China Railway, GE Healthcare, SAP, Tencent and the Insurance Australia Group, to name just a few.

    “One of the things that’s been happening is that we’re seven years in and the need for turning every type of infrastructure into programmable infrastructure has been proven out. “It’s no longer a debate,” OpenStack COO Mark Collier told me ahead of the projects semi-annual developer conference this week. OpenStack’s own surveys show that the project’s early adopters, who previously only tested it for their clouds, continue to move their production workflows to the platform, too. “We passed the hype phase,” Collier noted.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • FOSDEM 2018 - Distributions Devroom Call for Participation
  • Product pitches aren't on the list of reasons why we attend conferences

    Conferences are on my mind at the moment. Partially, it's because I recently attended the Open Source Summit and Linux Security Summit.

    [...]

    Just to be entirely clear: I really, really hate product pitches. Now, as I pointed out in the preceding paragraph, there's a place for learning about products. But it's absolutely not at an industry conference. But that's what everybody does—even (and this is truly horrible) in keynotes. Now, I really don't mind too much if a session title reads something like "Using Gutamaya's Frobnitz for token ring network termination"—because then I can ignore it if it's not relevant to me. And, frankly, most conference organizers outside company conferences actively discourage that sort of thing, as they know that most people don't come to those types of conferences to hear pitches.

  • Why aren't you an OpenStack mentor yet?

    OpenStack is a huge project composed of dozens of services, each with a different focus, design and specific team of developers. Just to illustrate, if we take Sahara as an example, Sahara is a service that is highly integrated with other services and relies on them to perform its basic features: for authentication it uses Keystone, to store its images it uses Glance, Heat is used for orchestrating instance creation, Neutron is used for networking, and Nova is where the instances creation are actually triggered. As such, getting started in such an environment can be overwhelming, especially for those without much experience. Having the opportunity to have someone to help a new contributor during the beginning of this new experience can help out with a lot of common difficulties, and attract even more new contributors to the community.

  • OpenZFS Developer Summit 2017

    The fifth annual OpenZFS Developer Summit was held October 24-25, 2017 in San Francisco. As with previous years: The goal of the event is to foster cross-community discussions of OpenZFS work and to make progress on some of the projects we have proposed. The first day of the event is presentations, and the second day is combined presentations and a hackathon. New contributors are welcome at the hackathon!

  • Microsoft Adds GCC ARM Cross-Compilation Support To Visual Studio [Ed: Microsoft is piggypacking GCC to promote its proprietary software that adds surveillance to compiled code]
  • GCC 8 Feature Development Is Ending Later This Month

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) will be seeing the last of its features added in the next two weeks for next year's GCC 8 stable release.

    SUSE's Richard Biener announced today that the feature development phase of GCC 8 will be ending on 17 November. After that point, GCC 8 enters "stage three" development meaning only bug fixing and documentation work will be allowed.

  • Europe Gets FLOSS

    Little by little the EU is working towards removing all barriers to adoption of Free/Libre Open Source Software. It works for people. It works for governments. It doesn’t enslave organizations to mindlessly plod on treadmills such as those of M$ and Oracle, continually cranking out revenue and entanglements to the benefit of a mindless corporation.

  • We're switching to a DCO for source code contributions

    We're committed to being good stewards of open source, and part of that commitment means we never stop re-evaluating how we do that. Saying "everyone can contribute" is about removing barriers to contribution. For some of our community, the Contributor License Agreement is a deterrent to contributing to GitLab, so we're changing to a Developer's Certificate of Origin instead.

  • Biomaker Fayre showcases 40 open source, low-cost biological instruments

    There was a real buzz in the air when 40 interdisciplinary teams exhibited their prototypes for the 2017 Biomaker Challenge at the University of Cambridge Department of Engineering.

    Projects covered everything from spectrometers for measuring the colour of penguin guano, microfluidics for tissue culture, to ultrasonic systems for measuring plant height and 3D printed modular microscopes. Each group was given a £1000 grant and four months to turn their big ideas for open source and DIY research tools into reality and over 100 people came along to the final event.

From lab to libre software: how can academic software research become open source?

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OSS
Sci/Tech

Academics generate enormous amounts of software, some of which inspires commercial innovations in networking and other areas. But little academic software gets released to the public and even less enters common use. Is some vast "dark matter" being overlooked in the academic community? Would the world benefit from academics turning more of their software into free and open projects?

I asked myself these questions a few months ago when Red Hat, at its opening of a new innovation center in Boston's high-tech Fort Point neighborhood, announced a unique partnership with the goal of tapping academia. Red Hat is joining with Boston-area computer science departments—starting with Boston University—to identify promising software developed in academic projects and to turn it into viable free-software projects. Because all software released by Red Hat is under free licenses, the partnership suggests a new channel by which academic software could find wider use.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Are open source solutions set to take the high ground in the telecoms industry?

    With open source solutions rapidly growing across the telecoms industry, we’re seeing a major shift with the migration from voice and data services to an encompassing set of networking tools. Operators are moving away from traditional hardware and software systems, says Robin Kent, director of European operations, Adax, with open source solutions now viewed as a key enabler of transformation and innovation.

    While open source solutions do have clear advantages, allowing third-party deployment without having to solely manage or develop the software, challenges still remain. For example, if there’s a bug that causes reliability problems or a crash in the network, how long does it take to fix the bug and who’s accountable for it? Until such industry issues are properly addressed, it seems that open source solutions will not be taking the high ground in the industry anytime soon.

  • Beyond Bitcoin: Oracle, IBM Prepare Blockchains for Industrial Use

    There’s been a lot of talk recently about blockchains beyond its original use for supporting Bitcoin. Earlier this year, we covered a session in London where the takeaway from the panel was there are too many problems to be solved. But that was in February, and a lot has changed since then.

    Judging from some of the blockchain sessions at the recent Oracle OpenWorld conference, the emerging potential uses for blockchain are kind of staggering.

  • Looking at November 4th

    There is a communications exercise this weekend that is being held by the United States Department of Defense involving the amateur radio community. That is to say, ham radio operators are doing a drill with the military in the United States. The subject of the drill is a simulation where a simulated Coronal Mass Ejection event causes a simulated nation-wide power grid failure and there is a call-up of stations on an interoperability frequency in the 60 meter frequency band to see who in all the three thousand counties of the United States of America is out there. The lights will not actually go out and there will not be an actual mass of charged particles hurtling towards Earth from our local star's corona that would make a human-created EMP generator's output look miniscule in comparison.

    [...]

    If anything, this will be fun. This is a simulation on a continental scale. Sadly, I don't have any working transmitting gear so I won't be able to fully take part. I will be able to set up the RadioShack DX-398 and listen in, though. Folks without radios at home can utilize the WebSDR (Software Defined Radio) network of receivers perhaps by learning more by pointing their browsers at http://websdr.org/.

  • Embedded Linux Conference Europe videos posted for free streaming

    The Linux Foundation has posted 13 videos of Open Source Summit Europe keynotes and 57 videos of Embedded Linux Conference Europe sessions on YouTube.

    The combined Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) and Open Source Summit Europe event held Oct. 23-25 in Prague, is now available for all to see. The Linux Foundation has posted 70 videos of events on YouTube, including videos of 57 ELCE presentations.

  • Alibaba leads $27m open source database MariaDB’s funding round

    MariaDB’s wallet just got a little thicker with a strong Series C investment round that featured Alibaba as the lead investor.

    The round, which saw the open source database company raise $27m in investment, was led by the Chinese company to the tune of €20 million of the total €22.9 million raised, according to Tech Crunch.

  • MariaDB reports successful investment round led by Alibaba

    MariaDB Corporation announced that it raised $27 million in an investment led by Alibaba Group. Combined with a recent $27 million investment from the European Investment Bank (EIB), this latest capital brings MariaDB’s total funding this year to $54 million. MariaDB will continue its collaboration with Alibaba Cloud, the cloud computing arm of Alibaba Group, to deliver new solutions for the cloud and emerging use cases. MariaDB reaches more than 60 million developers worldwide through its inclusion in every major Linux distribution, as well as a growing presence in the world’s major cloud providers. The latest investments reflect the rising interest in MariaDB from every commercial region around the world.

  • Acquia’s future builds up from open-source foundations
  • NHS Digital wants to beef up information exchange healthcare solutions through open source APIs

    Expressions of interest are invited from suppliers and INTEROPen members to get involved in new API Lab

    NHS Digital has announced plans to develop a new API Lab in Leeds to solve information exchange problems for patients and clinicians.

    The objective is to make patient information and securely accessible to healthcare professionals at the point of need.

    The API Lab will pool the expertise of developers from both industry and NHS Digital to accelerate the development of open source APIs designed to improve system integration across the NHS and social care.

    The Lab will work according to open standards group INTEROPen’s openness and transparency principles to address information exchange problems for patients and clinicians.

  • What are the Most Disliked Programming Languages?

The Microsoft-Connected Black Duck and FOSS 'Tax'

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

‘Tallinn declaration’ commits EU to increase use of open source

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OSS

When building or rebuilding ICT systems, public services should make more use of open source software solutions, the Ministers of the European Union Member States and EFTA countries agreed in Tallinn (Estonia) on 6 October. The recommendation is part of the ‘Tallinn Ministerial Declaration on eGovernment’.

By signing the Ministerial Declaration on eGovernment, the ministers agree that using open source solutions and open standards helps to avoid IT vendor lock-in. They call on public services to make their ICT solutions publicly available, and to encourage the private sector and civil society to reuse the software.

In addition, the ministers call on the Commission “to consider strengthening the requirements for use of open source solutions and standards when (re)building of ICT systems and solutions takes place with EU funding - including by an appropriate open licence policy - by 2020.”

Read more

MariaDB's Support From China

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Server
OSS
  • Open source database startup MariaDB confirms $27M investment led by Alibaba

    Open source database startup MariaDB has announced a new $27 million round of funding led by Alibaba, confirming the news that TechCrunch reported in September.

    As we wrote then, Alibaba contributed the majority of the round, supplying €20 million of the total €22.9 million raised.

  • Alibaba leads $27m round in US-based open source database firm MariaDB

    US and Finland based MariaDB Corporation, which provides an open source database, has raised $27 million in a series C funding led by Alibaba Group.

    The investment will see the company expanding its reach globally as the open source database standard.

  • Alibaba Group leads $27M funding round for MariaDB

    The source of the investment is part of what MariaDB Chief Executive Michael Howard (pictured) called “a funding hat trick” with nearly equal parts of the company’s total cash hoard coming from U.S., European and Asian investors. That reflects a new, more global way of doing business.

FOSS in Science: Harvard, Xiaopeng, Georgia Tech

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OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Making transparency work for Harvard's Dataverse Project

    A culture of transparency permeates the Dataverse project, contributing to its adoption in dozens of research institutions around the world. Headquartered at Harvard University, the Dataverse development team has more than a decade of experience operating as an open source project within an organization that values transparency: the Institute of Quantitative Social Science (IQSS). Working transparently helps the Dataverse team communicate changes to current development efforts, provides opportunities for the community to support each other, and facilitates contribution to the project.

  • Chinese Startup Goes All Out Cloning Tesla Via Open-Source Patents

    Thanks to Tesla’s decision to open-source its patents, Chinese startup Xiaopeng Motors has already manufactured several Model X clones.

  • Open Source Machine Learning Helps the Fight Against Cancer

    Here's an open invitation to steal. It goes out to cancer fighters and tempts them with a new program that predicts cancer drug effectiveness via machine learning and raw genetic data.

    The researchers who built the program at the Georgia Institute of Technology would like cancer fighters to take it for free, or even just swipe parts of their programming code, so they've made it open source. They hope to attract a crowd of researchers who will also share their own cancer and computer expertise and data to improve upon the program and save more lives together.

  • Georgia Tech researchers release open-source AI algorithm to predict effectiveness of cancer drugs

    A team of researchers from Atlanta-based Georgia Institute of Technology introduced an open-source algorithm Oct. 26 that predicts a cancer drug's effectiveness based on a patient's genetic data.

    The researchers developed the machine learning algorithm using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute's panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. Their goal was to create an algorithm that predicts optimal drug therapies based on individual patient tumors.

    In a study of 273 cancer patients, researchers found the algorithm to be about 85 percent accurate in assessing the effectiveness of nine drugs. By releasing the algorithm on an open-source platform, they hope other researchers will participate in refining their work.

3 open source alternatives to MATLAB

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OSS

For many students in mathematics, physical sciences, engineering, economics, and other fields with a heavy numeric component, MATLAB is their first introduction to programming or scientific computing in general.

It can be a good tool for learning, although (in my experience) many of the things that students and researchers use MATLAB for are not particularly demanding calculations; rather they could easily be conducted with any number of basic scripting tools, with or without statistical or math-oriented packages. However, it does have a near ubiquity in many academic settings, bringing with it a large community of users familiar with the language, plugins, and capabilities in general.

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OSS Leftovers: IoT, Voting, and the Future

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OSS
  • Why you should consider open source IoT solutions

    The society-wide adoption of the Internet of Things into our everyday business and cultural lives has left many company’s scrambling to find the best fit for the IoT in their businesses. Most of them have encountered serious trouble; choosing which IoT platform is right for you is no easy job, and the complexities of your decision can sometimes seem overwhelming.

    Considering an open source IoT solution to your company’s problems can help alleviate some of the burdens brought on by this decision. A quick review of how open source IoT solutions stand to benefit you without breaking the bank shows why this route may be the go-to option for IoT practitioners in the future.

  • What Happened When One Texas County Tried To Build A Cheap, Open-Source Election System

    STAR Vote’s goal was to make voters more comfortable with the security and reliability of electronic voting, DeBeauvoir says. STAR Vote would have provided voters with a paper receipt of their ballot. Such a receipt is called a Voter-Verified Paper Audit Trail, or VVPAT.

    “The purpose of a VVPAT Is to make sure the voter knows for a fact that the choices they have entered on the electronic voting system are in fact the correct choices that really represent their decisions,” DeBeauvoir says.

    Besides reassuring voters, a paper trail can help election officials perform post-election audits.

    “Most people think what we’re using the paper trail for is a recount,” she says. “You can just do post-election audits because you’re double-checking the math and the statistics of an election.”

  • Open-source—‘the way the future is being built’

    Pineberry Manufacturing Inc. makes friction feeders that insert coupons, paperboard inserts, envelopes, cards, etc. The firm claims to have the only open-source feeders in the marketplace, which means proprietary electrical components have been eliminated. Pineberry Manufacturing’s HSF and SF Series friction feeders, says the firm, are characterized by an unmatched level of operational simplicity, reliability, robustness, and cost efficiency. Also, they can be easily integrated into manual or automated lines. The HSF operates at 8,000 inches/min and the SF at 3,000.

    “Our friction feeders are open-source, servo-controlled power platforms with a Schneider Electric PLC touchscreen controller, reducing the overall number of components to the machine,” says Pineberry Manufacturing President David McCharles. “Users can get information from the terminal remotely through an app on a smart phone. Open-source technology is the way the future is being built.”

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."

Review: Fedora 27 Workstation

On the whole there are several things to like about Fedora 27. The operating system was stable during my trial and I like that there are several session options, depending on whether we want to use Wayland or the X display server or even a more traditional-looking version of GNOME. I am happy to see Wayland is coming along to the point where it is close to on par with the X session. There are some corner cases to address, but GNOME on Wayland has improved a lot in the past year. I like the new LibreOffice feature which lets us sign and verify documents and I like GNOME's new settings panel. These are all small, but notable steps forward for GNOME, LibreOffice and Fedora. Most of the complaints I had this week had more to do with GNOME specifically than Fedora as an operating system. GNOME on Fedora is sluggish on my systems, both on the desktop computer and in VirtualBox, especially the Wayland session. This surprised me as when I ran GNOME's Wayland session on Ubuntu last month, the desktop performed quite a bit better. Ubuntu's GNOME on Wayland session was smooth and responsive, but Fedora's was too slow for me to use comfortably and I switched over to using the X session for most of my trial. Two other big differences I felt keenly between Ubuntu and Fedora were with regards to how these two leading projects set up GNOME. On Ubuntu we have a dock that acts as a task switcher, making it a suitable environment for multitasking. Fedora's GNOME has no equivalent. This means Fedora's GNOME is okay for running one or two programs at a time, but I tend to run eight or nine applications at any given moment. This becomes very awkward when using Fedora's default GNOME configuration as it is hard to switch between open windows quickly, at least without installing an extension. In a similar vein, Ubuntu's GNOME has window control buttons and Fedora's version does not, which again adds a few steps to what are usually very simple, quick actions. What it comes down to is I feel like Ubuntu takes GNOME and turns it into a full featured desktop environment, while Fedora provides us with just plain GNOME which feels more like a framework for a desktop we can then shape with extensions rather than a complete desktop environment. In fact, I think that describes Fedora's approach in general - the distribution feels more like a collection of open source utilities rather than an integrated whole. Earlier I mentioned LibreOffice can work with signed documents, but Fedora has no key manager, meaning we need to find and download one. Fedora ships with Totem, which is a fine video player, but it doesn't work with Wayland, making it an odd default choice. These little gaps or missed connections show up occasionally and it sets the distribution apart from other projects like openSUSE or Linux Mint where there is a stronger sense the pieces of the operating system working together with a unified vision. The big puzzle for me this week was with software updates. Linux effectively solved updating software and being able to keep running without a pause, reboot or lock-up decades ago. Other mainstream distributions have fast updates - some even have atomic, on-line updates. openSUSE has software snapshots through the file system, Ubuntu has live kernel updates that do away with rebooting entirely and NixOS has atomic, versioned updates via the package manager, to name just three examples. But Fedora has taken a big step backward in making updates require an immediate reboot, and taking an unusually long time to complete the update process, neither of which benefits the user. Fedora has some interesting features and I like that it showcases new technologies. It's a good place to see what new items are going to be landing in other projects next year. However, Fedora feels more and more like a testing ground for developers and less like a polished experience for people to use as their day-to-day operating system. Read more

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more. The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system. Read more Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems

Android Leftovers