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OSS

FrostWire – A Cloud Downloader, BitTorrent Client and Media Player

Filed under
GNU
OSS

FrostWire (formerly known as Gnutella) is a free and open-source BitTorrent client and a fork of LimeWire. It was originally very similar to LimeWire in appearance and performance, but later developers added more rich features such as including BitTorrent protocol, Magnet Link, Wi-Fi sharing, Internet Radio, iTunes, Video/Audio Player support. It is written in Java language so it is compatible with all operating systems like Linux, Windows and Mac.

The FrostWire client is used to search, download and share large files and folders such as, Songs, Movies, Games, eBooks, Softwares, etc. across millions of people right from your computer from a peer-to-peer network.

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Vem Text Editor – An Alternative Command Layout for Vim

Filed under
OSS

Vem is a free and open-source command-line text editor with an alternative command layout designed to provide full keyboard support over the Vim text editor and to make it as intuitive as possible.

At its root, it is a set of configuration files that changes how Vim acts by reducing/simplifying the set of commands that are bonded to single keypresses and maps them across the keyboard to optimize their position according to their frequency.

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Why your open source project needs more than just coders

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OSS

Why do open source projects fail?

Lack of funding is a major factor, of course, but it's far from the only reason that open source projects fail to achieve sustainability. Sometimes there's a lack of understanding of how to create a product for a broad market, or some fundamental misstep with intellectual property rights (IPR)—such as failing to properly license your code.

It's hard for any open source project to sustain if it doesn't get these types of basics right. Collaboration across boundaries and the ability to iterate and expand are hindered, and innovation is stifled. I see these fatal flaws especially in a lot of humanitarian projects—passion projects—and it is heartbreaking.

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How to judge open-source projects

Filed under
OSS

Plenty of people have put together systems to collect, judge, and evaluate open-source projects, including information about a project's popularity, reliability, and activity. But they all have flaws.

Take that oldest of metrics: Lines of code (LoC). Yes, it's easy to measure. But it's also profoundly misleading. As programming genius Edsger Dijkstra observed in 1988, LOC gives us "the reassuring illusion that programs are just devices like any others, the only difference admitted being that their manufacture might require a new type of craftsmen, viz. programmers. From there it is only a small step to measuring 'programmer productivity' in terms of 'number of lines of code produced per month.' This is a very costly measuring unit because it encourages the writing of insipid code."

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Design a book cover with an open source alternative to InDesign

Filed under
OSS

I recently finished writing a book about C programming, which I self-published through Lulu.com. I've used Lulu for several book projects, and it's a great platform. Earlier this year, Lulu made changes that give authors greater control over creating their book covers. Previously, you just uploaded a pair of large-format images for the front and back book covers. Now, Lulu allows authors to upload a custom PDF exactly sized to your book's dimensions.

You can create the cover using Scribus, the open source page layout program. Here's how I do it.

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My dramatic journey to becoming an open source engineer

Filed under
OSS

It's been five years and a heck of a journey from being a non-programmer to becoming an associate software engineer at Red Hat. It's a story worth telling—not because I have achieved a lot, but because of so much drama and so many pitfalls. So grab a cup of coffee, and I will share the unturned pages of my love story with technology.

People say love is as powerful as hate. And love stories that start with hate are often the most passionate ones. My love story with technology was just like that. I got into the world of programming in my freshman year of college. It was my most painful subject. Even though I have always been passionate about futuristic technologies, I didn't know how to move forward towards my passion.

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Top 10 Free and Open-Source Games to Play in 2020

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

Courtesy of open-source software, you could not only save a large amount of cash but also get the chance to make amendments to the code so that the application better fits your needs. When it comes to video games, most of the popular titles won’t be open-source. With that being said, if you look hard enough, you’re going to find a plethora of open-source games on the Internet.

Although such games are only a Google search away, it should be noted that there is a wide variety of open-source games out there, so it might take quite a while for you to get to the best ones. Considering this, FOSSLinux thought to do all the research for you and compile this list of the best free and open-source games to play in 2020.

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Nextcloud incorporates Kaspersky antivirus security

Filed under
OSS
Security

These days we almost all use personal Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) clouds at work, such as Dropbox, Google Drive, and Microsoft OneDrive. But, if privacy and security are at the top of your mind, these public clouds are, well, public. That's where the open-source, private IaaS cloud software Nextcloud enters. You control your data. Now with Kaspersky Scan Engine added on, you make sure your files are free of malware before they're loaded into the cloud.

Like any of the personal IaaS clouds, with clients on mobile and desktop operating systems and files saved to your server, users can unknowingly upload and share infected files. The integrated antivirus Scan Engine intercepts and blocks such potentially dangerous files as they're uploaded on the server-side. This makes sure malware isn't spread to other users.

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How a local government migrated to open source

Filed under
OSS

In 2015, the Eyüpsultan Municipality in Istanbul, Turkey, began a bold migration to adopting open source software. This involved several major changes: Linux on the desktop and major changes to the IT infrastructure, including a transition to the Zimbra email server and the PostgreSQL database.

This was a big decision, and it wasn't made lightly. Open source technologies provide an important opportunity for our country to have an independent and secure information infrastructure. There are uncertainties about future terms and costs of using licensed software that connects users to a particular brand ecosystem. The more connected to these technologies we are, the harder it is to switch to alternative products. The commercial nature of key companies, to say nothing of pricing and licensing policies, poses significant risks.

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Warpinator – Send and Receive Files Across a Network

Filed under
OSS

Warpinator is a free, open-source tool for sending and receiving files between computers that are on the same network. All you need do is install Warpinator on the computers, choose a group code, edit your firewalls if necessary, and that’s all.

It features a simple, themeable user interface with an easy-to-configure menu and works without the need for any servers or special configuration. Warpinator is an official file sharing app developed by Linux Mint.

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