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OSS

Announcing etcd 3.4

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Server
OSS

etcd v3.4 includes a number of performance improvements for large scale Kubernetes workloads.

In particular, etcd experienced performance issues with a large number of concurrent read transactions even when there is no write (e.g. “read-only range request ... took too long to execute”). Previously, the storage backend commit operation on pending writes blocks incoming read transactions, even when there was no pending write. Now, the commit does not block reads which improve long-running read transaction performance.

We further made backend read transactions fully concurrent. Previously, ongoing long-running read transactions block writes and upcoming reads. With this change, write throughput is increased by 70% and P99 write latency is reduced by 90% in the presence of long-running reads. We also ran Kubernetes 5000-node scalability test on GCE with this change and observed similar improvements. For example, in the very beginning of the test where there are a lot of long-running “LIST pods”, the P99 latency of “POST clusterrolebindings” is reduced by 97.4%. This non-blocking read transaction is now used for compaction, which, combined with the reduced compaction batch size, reduces the P99 server request latency during compaction.

More improvements have been made to lease storage. We enhanced lease expire/revoke performance by storing lease objects more efficiently, and made lease look-up operation non-blocking with current lease grant/revoke operation. And etcd v3.4 introduces lease checkpoint as an experimental feature to persist remaining time-to-live values through consensus. This ensures short-lived lease objects are not auto-renewed after leadership election. This also prevents lease object pile-up when the time-to-live value is relatively large (e.g. 1-hour TTL never expired in Kubernetes use case).

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Linux Foundation: Hyperledger and LF Edge

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OSS
  • Ethereum Poised to Be First Public Blockchain in Hyperledger Consortium

    Ethereum could become the first public blockchain on Hyperledger – if the open-source consortium’s technical steering committee approves a proposal to adopt the ConsenSys-backed Pantheon project.

    Pantheon is a suite of ethereum-based services built by PegaSys, a 50-strong engineering team at ConsenSys. The Pantheon ethereum client, built on Java, is used to develop enterprise applications with features like privacy and permissioning.

    The proposal was sent out in a Hyperledger mailing list email on Aug. 8, and if it is accepted, Pantheon will be renamed Hyperledger Besu (a Japanese term for base or foundation).

  • Ethereum Client Becomes First Public Blockchain on Hyperledger

    “We’ve always wanted to be a gateway for enterprises to public chains while also meeting the needs of private and permissioned networks,” Hartley told CoinDesk. “I think this is a good step in that process.”

    Now the Hyperledger staff will work with ConsenSys to transfer Pantheon’s GitHub repository to the consortium and set up email lists and chat channels connected to the project. In recent months, ConsenSys has also donated ConsenSys CAVA to the Apache Software Foundation, which is now being incubated as Apache Tuweni.

  • Linux Foundation Defines Edge Computing with New Glossary

    Edge Computing today is a somewhat nebulous concept with an associated set of equally hazy related technologies. The Linux Foundation's LF Edge project is all about Edge Computing and is seeking to help define Edge Computing and its' associated concepts with the second version of the Open Glossary of Edge Computing released on August 29.
    "As the diversity of LF Edge increases, we want frameworks in place that make it easy to talk about edge computing in consistent and less-biased ways," stated Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge, and IoT, at the Linux Foundation. "It’s imperative the community comes together to converge on a shared vocabulary, as it will play a substantial role in how our industry discusses and defines the next-generation internet."

OSS and Security Leftovers

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OSS
Security
  • What Would it Take to Challenge DJI’s Dominance in the Drone Market?

    Monday, CNN reported that Ellen Lord, the U.S. Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, told reporters that the department was seeking investors to develop U.S. manufactured drones so that the military would not be reliant upon Chinese-manufactured DJI products. That may be somewhat misleading – DJI certainly has never claimed to go after the military market, and accusations about “sending data back to China” remain vague and unproven. It is true, however, that drone manufacturers globally have struggled to compete with DJI’s rapid development cycles and manufacturing efficiencies: and there may be an argument that more competition in the commercial market could help to expand use cases and broaden the scope of drone innovation.

    [...]

    Understanding the Concept of an Open Source Platform for Drones

    While adoption of the open source platform is growing rapidly, it’s still a confusing concept to many consumers or commercial drone pilots. The common comparison is between Apple and Android, with DJI as the iOS of the drone world. Auterion co-founder Kevin Sartori clarifies that the comparison isn’t entirely accurate: the drone industry is still in the very early stages of development towards its real potential.

    “Our high level assumption is that drones are still feature phones,” says Sartori. “We might not be at smart phone stage, we’re still talking about Nokia,” he explains. “Drones aren’t connected yet. There is no easy way to distribute apps. With Auterion, we are building the infrastructure that will allow the industry to get there.”

    How Open Source is Being Used Now – and Auterion’s Place in the Market

    PX4 and open source tools are now being used to make new and innovative hardware products fly: from offerings from Chinese manufacturer Yuneec to new U.S. drone manufacturer Impossible Aerospace, developing a long endurance battery powered aircraft. Open source is allowing new drone companies and customers to focus on specific problems, says Sartori, without having to reinvent a way to make the drone fly: “Companies don’t actually build the whole solution, they focus on their added value,” he says. “It’s a natural evolution of the industry, and it helps the industry accelerate.”

  • The 13 Best Open Source Network Monitoring Tools

    We at Solutions Review compiled a list of the best open source network performance monitoring tools currently on the market!

  • Platform9 Raises $25 Mn to Leverage Open-source Modern Technologies and Enhance Cloud-native Infrastructure

    Platform9, the in SaaS-managed hybrid cloud company, announced that raised $25 million in Series D funding, bringing the total amount raised by the company to $61.5 million. This round was led by NGP Capital, with participation from Mubadala Ventures and all existing investors (Redpoint Ventures, Menlo Ventures, Canvas Ventures, and HPE Pathfinder). Rohini Chakravarthy, Partner at NGP Capital, joins Platform9’s board of directors with this round of financing.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (dovecot, gettext, go, go-pie, libnghttp2, and pigeonhole), Debian (djvulibre, dovecot, and subversion), Fedora (sleuthkit and wireshark), openSUSE (containerd, docker, docker-runc, and qbittorrent), Oracle (pango), SUSE (kernel, nodejs10, and python-SQLAlchemy), and Ubuntu (apache2).

  • This Week In Security: VPN Gateways, Attacks In The Wild, VLC, And An IP Address Caper

    We'll start with more Black Hat/DEFCON news.

Zambia should reduce cost of software ownership

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OSS

Many Zambians may not know that there are software/programmes that we can use on our computing devices without paying license fees; such software exists and is called free and open source software (FOSS).

It is free, as in freedoms; it guarantees freedoms to organisations and persons using it. FOSS is released under the General Public License (GPL) and the concept of developing FOSS was started in 1983 by Richard Stallman, who was a researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Computer Laboratory. This implies that FOSS has come of age.

Read more

Also: Do Citizens Have A Right To See The Algorithms Used By Publicly-Funded Software?

Events: Red Hat Summit 2020, Akademy and FSF Licensing and Compliance

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OSS
  • Call for papers now open for Red Hat Summit 2020

    We’re excited to announce that the call for papers is now open for the 16th annual Red Hat Summit, to be held April 27-29, 2020 in San Francisco. We’re inviting our partners, customers, collaborators and community members to participate in the industry’s premier enterprise open source technology conference.

    Red Hat Summit has become a must-attend technology event to experience the latest and greatest in open source innovations that are the future of enterprise technology—from hybrid cloud infrastructure, containers and cloud-native app platforms to management, automation, emerging tech and more. Over the years, we’ve seen incredible value in bringing together leaders across the IT industry to collaborate, innovate and help grow our industry.

  • Akademy Schedule Mobile Access

    Last weekend I worked in a improved version of Akademy schedule that I launched last year.

  • Continuing Legal Education Seminar on GPL Enforcement and Legal Ethics

    The FSF Licensing and Compliance Lab will work with experienced lawyers and professionals to provide a full day continuing legal education (CLE) seminar on GPL Enforcement and Legal Ethics for legal professionals, law students, free software developers, and anyone interested in licensing issues.

  • Early registration open for FSF's licensing seminar on Oct 16 in Raleigh, NC

    The CLE seminar is a regular program from the FSF, where a select a group of experts and experienced instructors in the free software community provide a comprehensive overview of current affairs in GPL Enforcement and Legal Ethics. We invite legal professionals, law students, free software developers, and anyone interested in licensing and compliance topics to join. While registration is open to the public, this seminar is a special opportunity for legal professionals and law students who can potentially earn continuing legal education (CLE) credits for participating (approval pending). The program will be available shortly on the event page.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Alternatives for Adobe Acrobat, Photoshop and more [iophk: could have also mentioned Krita and LibreOffice Draw]

    GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) offers 130-plus amazing filters and special effects. See Alvin Alexander’s blog for all the cool stuff GIMP can do. I especially like the Borders Sparkles, Reflections, and Gradient Flare effects; and the Whirl and Pinch features. I also appreciate that GIMP works on multiple platforms, uses minimal system resources, and is super-easy to use.

  • LibreOffice monthly recap: August 2019

    Over in Europe, members of the German LibreOffice community attended FrOSCon, one of the largest FOSS events in the country. We had a stand with flyers, stickers and a computer demonstrating LibreOffice Online and its integration in eGroupWare. It was great to meet so many passionate free software fans, and all being well, we’ll be back there again next year…

    [...]

    While we’re gearing up for the aforementioned LibreOffice Conference 2019, we’re also looking ahead to proposals for the 2020 event. The Document Foundation received two different proposals for the organisation of LibOCon 2020, from the Turkish and German communities. TDF members are voting to decide on exactly where it will take place, so stay tuned for the announcement…

  • Best WordPress Translation Plugins for a Multilingual Website

    You might be thinking, which is the best WordPress translation plugin for a Multilingual Website. If you research, you’ll find a lot of options, circling on the internet.

    But which is the best plugin, and how to use it? Google suggests many, but how many of them are reliable? How to use a particular plugin and why is it so popular? These are some of the things you might be contemplating as you begin your search for the best WordPress translation plugin for a Multilingual Website.

    WordPress is the world-famous open-source platform giving options to create your website in your language. Millions around the world use WordPress to create their website but, the crux of the problem is WordPress doesn’t have enough linguistic tools.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (apache2 and faad2), openSUSE (schismtracker), Red Hat (ceph and pango), Scientific Linux (pango), SUSE (apache-commons-beanutils, ceph, php7, and qemu), and Ubuntu (ceph, dovecot, and ghostscript).

SparkFun continues to innovate thanks to open source hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

When SparkFun Electronics founder and CEO Nathan Seidle was an engineering student at the University of Colorado, he was taught, "Real engineers come up with an idea and patent that idea." However, his experience with SparkFun, which he founded from his college apartment in 2003, is quite the opposite.

All 600 "SparkFun original" components are for sale on the site in addition to 1000+ resell products. All of the company's schematics and code are licensed under CC BY-SA, with some firmware CC0, and its design files are available on public GitHub repos. In addition, some of the company's designs are Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) certified.

Read more

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

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OSS
  • Boostnote is an easy to use open-source, cross-platform note-taking app in active development

    Unsurprisingly, software developers are very passionate about both and very attached to their choices. One of the features offered by the newly Product Hunt award-winning note-taking app Boostnote – the support for both Vim and Emacs keybindings – shows the degree to which it caters specifically to the niche market made up of programmers, as it facilitates the workflow they are used to in their full-fledged editors.

    Boostnote, which recently rolled out a new version, doesn't stop there when it comes to being programmer-friendly: it allows users to make both Markdown and code snippets notes in a fairly clean and easy to use interface. Markdown notes are previewed in a split pane in the same window, while code snippets support over 100 programming languages with syntax highlighting.

    Other features include Markdown auto-formatting and drag-and-drop embedding of images.

    These notes are saved automatically and synced between devices. Boostnote is a cross-platform application, written for Linux, Mac, Windows, as well as Android and iOS.

  • Flash Content to be Preserved as Newgrounds Develops Open-Source Emulator

    The iconic website that hosted what many consider to be the birthplace of Internet content creation wants to make sure we don’t lose out on history

    Anyone who was active on the Internet in the early to mid-2000s will no doubt have heard of Newgrounds, a place where anybody with a passion to create animation, games or full-blown films could come together and share their work with others. Many of these products were created with the use of Adobe Flash, a nifty little piece of design that allowed users to create all kinds of unique interactions, visuals and sound effects.

    Hell, before I even knew what “mainstream” gaming I was I would spend hours playing the original browser versions of games that nearly everyone has heard of now like Linerider, Alien Hominid, Super Mario 63 and Realm of the Mad God. Flash games were a quaint little past time for many and a jumping board for creators looking to put their names out there.

  • Newgrounds Working on Open-Source Emulator to Preserve Flash Content

    Newgrounds announced last Friday plans to preserve Flash content on the web. Used for everything from animations to games, Flash had a considerable presence on the site. Creators across the globe uploaded thousands of passion projects. Many of these projects became cornerstones of Internet culture, from the Numa Numa Dance to Metal Gear Awesome. Despite Flash’s deprecation as a program, sites still run it to this day. Their emulator, currently called Ruffle, seeks to preserve the technology and keep it accessible.

  • Arturo Borrero González: Wikimania 2019 Stockholm summary

    A couple of weeks ago I attended the Wikimania 2019 conference in Stockholm, Sweden. This is the general and global conference for the Wikimedia movement, in which people interested in free knowledge gather together for a few days. The event happens annually, and this was my first time attending such conference. Wikimania 2019 main program ran for 3 days, but we had 2 pre-conference days in which a hackathon was held.

    The venue was an amazing building in the Stockholm University, Aula Magna.

    The hackathon reunited technical contributors, such as developers, which are interested in a variety of technical challenges in the wiki movement. You can find in the hackathon people interested in wiki edits automation, research, anti harassment tools and also infrastructure engineering and architecture, among other things.

  • Now You Can Watch the Keynotes from CC’s 2019 Global Summit

    We wanted to make sure that the insights shared by the summit’s seven amazing keynote speakers are accessible to people who couldn’t make it to the event, so we’ve uploaded their talks to YouTube and made them available under a CC Attribution license.

  • SELF Magazine and the AAP Promote Vaccine Awareness Through CC-Licensed Images

    After consulting with us here at Creative Commons, SELF and the AAP chose to release these images under our Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, so that they can be freely used by anyone—including media outlets, hospitals, public health departments, and other organizations creating content about vaccines—as long as credit is given to the photographer.

Open Hardware: OrangeCrab, RISC-V, TinyGo and More

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • How an NSA researcher plans to allow everyone to guard against firmware attacks

    The project will increase security in machines essentially by placing a machine’s firmware in a container to isolate it from would-be attackers. A layer of protection is being added to the System Management Interrupt (SMI) handler — code that allows a machine to make adjustments on the hardware level — as part of the open source firmware platform Coreboot.

    Eugene Myers, who works in the National Security Agency’s Laboratory for Advanced Cybersecurity, told CyberScoop that the end product — known as an SMI Transfer Monitor with protected execution (STM-PE) — will work with x86 processors that run Coreboot. Attackers are increasingly targeting firmware in order to run malicious attacks. Just last year, the first-ever documented UEFI rootkit was deployed in the wild, according to ESET researchers.

  • Manly McManface: Endgame

    Rather than track sales of this book forever, I’ve rounded up the amount I donated to $250. I expect this will cover the lifetime sales of this particular edition. Tilted Windmill Press is now a proud sponsor of SIGP’s Stop Traffic 5K Walk/Run on 21 September.

  • Seven God-Like Bash History Shortcuts You Will Actually Use

    Here I outline the shortcuts I actually use every day. When people see me use them they often ask me “what the hell did you do there!?”, conferring God-like status on me with minimal effort or intelligence required.

  • Bringing students together with open source technology

    Recently, Tamarind Tree, a collective from India that works towards social justice, open knowledge and open technology, shared a beautiful story of how a class of students in their School is using group messaging within their Moodle site. Because one of their classmates cannot attend school currently due to family circumstances, the students are using group messaging to update their friend about what’s happening in class and encouraging her to come back to school as soon as possible.

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More in Tux Machines

Purism: A Privacy Based Computer Company

It all started when Todd Weaver, Founder and CEO of Purism, realized Big Tech could not be trusted as moral guardians of his and his children’s data. The current paradigm of corporations data hoarding is, as Todd describes it, built on “a tech-stack of exploitation”–and not by accident, but by design. Companies such as Google and Microsoft–and especially Facebook–intentionally collect, store and share user data to whomever they see fit. In recent events, the California Consumer Privacy Act, which becomes effective on January 1, 2020, will make residents of California able to know what personal data is being collected about them, know whether their personal data is sold or disclosed and to whom, say no to the sale of personal data, access their personal data, request a business delete any personal data information about a consumer collected from that consumer and not be discriminated against for exercising their privacy rights. This sounds good, and it is, but not according to Big Tech. Big Tech such as Facebook hired a firm to run ads that said things like “Your next click could cost you $5! Say no to the California Consumer Privacy Act”. Big Tech does not care about privacy, they care about their bottom line. This is where Purism comes in. Purism is a privacy focused company. Their devices, the Librem5, Librem13 and Librem15 run PureOS–a GNU/Linux distribution that puts privacy, security and freedom first, by design. It includes popular privacy-respecting software such as PureBrowser. The OS helps you “Surf the web safely without being tracked by advertisers or marketers” and allows you to easily encrypt your entire OS and data with your own encryption keys. This is huge, especially if you understand how much of your “private” data is actually being shared. Read more

Benchmarks: Linux Boot Times, 16-Core HoneyComb LX2K ARM Workstation and New PTS Release

  • A Look At The Speedy Clear Linux Boot Time Versus Ubuntu 19.10

    Given the interest last week in how Clear Linux dropped their kernel boot time from 3 seconds to 300 ms, here are some fresh boot time benchmarks of Clear Linux compared to Ubuntu 19.10 on both Intel and AMD hardware. The systemd-reported boot time was compared between the latest Clear Linux and Ubuntu 19.10 daily images. Ubuntu 19.10 was used for offering the bleeding-edge packages and being more in line to what is offered by the rolling-release Clear Linux. As well, Canonical has been working on some boot time improvements for Ubuntu 19.10.

  • 16-Core HoneyComb LX2K ARM Workstation Looks To Offer A Decent Performance Oomph

    When it comes to ARM-powered workstation boards there hasn't been a whole lot to get excited about with the likes of the Socionext 96Boards Developerbox being quite expensive and not yielding good performance or featureful boards compared to alternative Intel/AMD/POWER workstation/enthusiast boards. One of the more promising ARM workstation boards we have been following is the HoneyComb LX2K (formerly the "ClearFog" board) and it's looking like it could end up being a decent offering in this space. The HoneyComb LX2K / ClearFog is the 16-core mini-ITX workstation board we have been following since earlier this year. They have been aiming for this 16-core ARM workstation board for $500~750 USD and it looks like they will actually strike on the lower-end of that price-range.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 Released With New Result Viewer, Offline/Enterprise Benchmarking Enhancements

    Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 is now available as the latest quarterly feature release to our cross-platform, open-source automated benchmarking framework. With Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 comes a rewritten result viewer to offer more result viewing functionality previously only exposed locally via the command-line or through a Phoromatic Server (or OpenBenchmarking.org when results are uploaded), new offline/enterprise usage improvements, various hardware/software detection enhancements on different platforms, and a variety of other additions.

SDR dev kit builds on Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC

Avnet has launched an “RFSoC Development Kit” that extends Xilinx’s eval kit for its Linux-powered, Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC. The kit adds a Qorvo 2×2 Small Cell RF front-end for SDR prototyping and integrates MATLAB and Simulink. Xilinx launched its 5G-focused Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC variant of its Arm/FPGA hybrid Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoc last year and then announced a Gen3 update in early February. Avnet has now launched an extended version of the Linux-driven Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC ZCU111 Evaluation Kit that adds a Qorvo 2×2 Small Cell RF Front-end 1.8GHz Card and MATLAB support for software-defined radio (SDR) prototyping, Read more Also: SMARC 2.0 module runs Linux on i.MX8M Mini

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